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  1. #1
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    Cool Clock Speed Less Than Advertised?

    I use a Hewlett Packard ProBook 4530s running under Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 64-bit SP1. In the 18 months I've had this machine, it's seemed slow when comparing it with older machines running under Windows XP. I'd always assumed this was due to Windows 7, which takes an age to bring up a help screen or list the files in a folder (ie do a "directory listing" in DOS-speak). However, recently, it occurred to me that maybe it was overheating and causing the CPU to run at a slower clock speed.

    So I downloaded and ran a little program called CPU-Z (see below). This program confirms that I have an Intel Core i3 CPU with a nominal speed of 2.10 GHz. However, it shows an actual speed of 798.33 MHz, ie less than half the nominal speed. This speed appears to be the product of the bus speed, 99.79 MHz, and a "multiplier" of 8.0, with the multiplier lying in a range of 8-21. This sort of makes sense since if the multiplier were 21 then the actual speed would be (all but) the nominal speed of 2.10 GHz. (I did also download and run a program called SpeedFan to check for abnormally high temperatures, but this shows temperatures to be within the normal range.)

    CPU-Z.jpg

    So my question, in a nutshell, is: why is my computer running with the "multiplier" set at the lowest possible value and is there any way I can get it to run faster?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Run a load and check it again. Try Prime95.
    Your core speed should increase with load.

    It might also be possible that your advanced processor energy settings may be set up conservatively to maintain battery charge longevity.
    So have a look at some of your advanced power options. Remember, it's a notebook and default settings will usually be set conservatively.
    Lastly, boot to BIOS and look around at, if any, what advanced performance options you have.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-05-10 at 13:56.
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  3. #3
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    It looks like Speedstep is active: http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum...dstep-f-q.html

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  5. #4
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    Run a load and check it again. Try Prime95.
    Your core speed should increase with load.
    The purpose of running Prime95 is to generate some activity (put the CPU under load)?

  6. #5
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    Thanks very much, CLINT and satrow, for your prompt replies! You were both right - I first had a close look at the power settings and found that the minimum processor state was set to 5%. On setting this to 100%, CPU-Z showed the Core Speed as 2095.61 MHz (although for some reason it occasionally reverts back to 798.33 for a fraction of a second). Then when I had a look at the site describing SpeedStep, I found that I'd followed exactly the procedure required to disable SpeedStep.

    So, problem solved - thanks again!

  7. #6
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    I hope you changed the appropriate profile- plugged in not battery.

    Personally, I choose to allow my CPU to slow down and cool off, especially in a laptop.

    If you would like to know what is actually the cause of your perceived slow-down, I need to know the computers you are using for reference; are the XP boxes Pentium 4s? With Hyper-Threading enabled? @ 2.8Ghz? I've seen this CPU beat newer CPUs.

    and your XP boxes are 32-bit, right?

    Are you aware of the fact that 32bit Windows is faster than 64bit Windows in most normal every day activities?

    There is the mismatch of comparing 32bit XP to 64bit 7, but that should be marginal if your XP boxes are tweaked appropriately (7 is faster on an identical system compared to XP out of the box, but XP can be tweaked to compensate a bit).


    My 32bit W7 box runs circles around much higher clock-speed CPU XP boxes... Heck, even beats my Vista 64 box...

    Also, try disabling Aero effects to get a noticeable speed boost (if your video card is on board, particularly)

    You can use this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compari...tel_Processors
    to compare your current CPU to your older CPU

    Just because a CPU is newer does not always mean it is better.

  8. #7
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    Thanks for your input, Ben. As I mentioned in my original post, the areas where I most notice a (severe) reduction in speed are listing the files in a folder and bringing up a help screen. There's a particular folder which I look in from time to time. Today, I timed how long it took to list the files - over 2 mins 30 secs! For its counterpart in the XP machine (Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 @ 2.33 GHz nominal) the list was virtually instantaneous. Having ruled out processor speed as the culprit, the blame lies firmly at the feet of Win 7 - anyway, that's how it looks to me.

  9. #8
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    Directory listing is slow?

    You may have disabled the NTFS last-accessed time stamp on the XP and not the 7.

    This specific issue though, I am plagued with also. Same folder, same files.... XP is BAM! and loaded, 7 can take absolutely forever. Think it might have something to do with 7 wanting to put a thumbnail instead of an icon, so it has to look inside each file instead of just scanning the filetype (.txt or .jpg, etc).

    I've even go as far as disable all the goodies in 7 over XP (as far as I could tell) and it made no difference.

    Maybe we can get some help about directory listings being slow as molasses on 7 compared to XP? Heck, even my Vista box loads that folder faster than 7!

  10. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Try right clicking on the slow root folder and left click on properties.
    Click on the customize tab
    Change "Optimize this Folder For:" to Documents rather than the default General Items.

    Jerry

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  12. #10
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    thank you!!!!

  13. #11
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You're welcome.

    Jerry

  14. #12
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    Thanks Jerry!

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