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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger chowur's Avatar
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    The one big fix that could save Windows 8

    Jason Hiner pretty wells sum's it up;http://www.zdnet.com/the-one-big-fix...-8-7000015339/
    Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them. -Albert Einsten

  2. #2
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Jason Hiner is right.

    Microsoft did have separate Windows versions for a while. On one side was 95/98/Me, and on the other side was NT/2000.

    Back then you chose between backward compatibility and stability/security. Now that they no longer have to have separate versions based on those two concepts, they could have separate versions based on tablet/portability vs desktop/laptop/work-at-your-desk. Those are the two types of users these days, and they shouldn't try to merge the two, because, as the author says, if you try to merge the two, you will have opposing compromises for both types of users. Better to eliminate as many compromises as possible, so as to give both types of users the best experience possible. If Microsoft will do that, then Windows 8 will really take off, even more than Windows 7 has.

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    The one way I can think of that they could successfully merge the "portable" user and the "desktop" user would be as follows:

    The computer is portable, such as a high-powered tablet. When you take it with you, it is completely portable, with full tablet functionality: touch screen, etc.

    When you arrive back at your desk, you plug it into your docking station, and now you have full "desktop" functionality: monitor/mouse/keyboard, printer, USB and other ports, etc. AND YOU HAVE A START BUTTON!

    The computer would switch automatically, based on if it is plugged into the docking station or not. The user wouldn't have to do a thing except plug it in or unplug it.

    If Windows 8 could be set up this way, I believe that most if not all of the complaints would cease.

  4. #4
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    Well of course, Hiner isn't saying anything that a ton of folks have been saying already almost since the first day of release including me-self. Maybe not auto-switching as you say though because some folks will prefer to run it as is in any or most environments and it would irritate them as much to keep switching back to Start as the current configuration does us.
    Also, maybe, just maybe (or maybe not ) the folks who say its as easy as adding a third party start menu and disabling corners and what-not, are starting to realize the incidental consequences as a result of MS removing the start menu; that capacity had to be displaced to other areas and alternate methods for accomplishing the same thing, all needlessly. Keep It Stupid Simple (KISS).
    For the most part, in the U.K., cars are driven on the left side of the street and the steering wheel is on the right, in America, driven on the right side of the street and the steering wheel is on the left. What's the lesson? Good thing Microsoft isn't building cars for the U.K. and U.S.!!!

  5. #5
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    F.U.N.,

    Boy that would bring a new meaning to Back Seat Driving!
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  6. #6
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    Oh great. Yet another "expert" volunteering his inestimable wisdom for us. This guy offers nothing new. He also mis-states Microsoft's intention as stated in the linked article. Bringing back the Start BUTTON is not the same as bringing back the Start Menu. That the start menu is NOT being resurrected was confirmed this past week in various interviews by Ms. Reller, the Windows division CFO.

    As far as businesses go, most businesses have either recently completed an upgrade to Windows 7 or are in process of upgrading to Windows 7. There is no way they are going to undertake another OS upgrade in that short a time frame. This guy is either delusional or has never seriously looked at how the majority of Enterprise agreement or Software Assurance customers handle OS upgrades. Nice of him to cherry pick one comment from an unscientific poll to "prove" his conjecture that businesses have turned against Windows 8.

    His statements about the power consumption and CPU usage are dated at best. He evidently has not paid attention to the last several design cycles of X86 processors as both Intel and AMD have introduced lower power consuming models across their lines while increasing processing power at the same time. Devices as a whole have followed the trend. The tradeoffs made in smaller devices such as tablets &, ultrabooks are made out of necessity not because of some nebulous desire to have a lesser performing device. Does anyone seriously think that if any device maker could put the same processing power CPU and get the same battery life and portability they would opt to put a lesser CPU?

    If Microsoft did not realize that there is still a place for the traditional desktop they would have eliminated it completely. But the desktop is there. It easy to get to. I use Windows 8 all day every day at work and at home. Mostly on non-touch devices. At work in particular I stay in the desktop 80 - 90 percent of the time. At home the percentage is less but still slightly over the majority in the desktop. I do not find myself the least bit constrained. I do not have trouble running programs I normally use. I do not have trouble finding files of any sort. I realize there are others in the Lounge who may have different work habits that could have more difficulties than I.

    Joe

  7. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I'd be on board with MS separating out their operating systems. Combining portable OS and desktop has always been a poor idea imo.
    But the start menu I could easily live without now that I enjoy it absence, and the fact that it was never really needed.

    I also have to say, frankly, I quite like the way many people are upset with Windows 8, and the loss of the traditional start menu.
    Personally I'd like to see them all complain with their feet & wallets and adapt to MAC or Linux.
    This would be the only way to force MS into true, real, & innovative competition imo.

    Strip the OS down and let us choose what to install, or not to install.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-05-15 at 23:44.
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    Separate the OSes and Microsoft loses its most compelling argument to attract developers to a new OS - market share. Today the fight is not about operating systems, it's about ecosystems. Microsoft is trying to get a position in mobile computing, where it has been MIA in the last few years. Bringing in a new OS, without the market weight of Windows, would be more than an uphill battle - look at the phone scenario, after two years, Windows Phone sales are just going near 5%!
    Rui
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  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I'm in agreement with Rui for the most part. The only way Microsoft can increase its market share in the "touch" ecosystem is through leveraging of its user base. IMO they've started out a bit heavy-handed in trying to force the Metro UI on everyone, but they have no other viable route into the tablet/handheld ecosystem.

    Windows 8 is not two OS's. It's two UI's for a single OS. "Run in a separate process" (similar in many ways to "sandboxing") has been available since Win2K. That's pretty much the Metro UI and its Tiles in a nutshell, with a few extra limitations thrown in. I've had my hands in the guts of Windows 8, and there's no mine field in the Registry. It is actually easier to take apart and reassemble than Windows 7, and after doing that, everything still works. I didn't have to take apart two OS's - just the one.

    What Microsoft has done makes sense; it's the way they've gone about it that's poked the stick in the hornet's nest.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    I'm in agreement with Rui for the most part. The only way Microsoft can increase its market share in the "touch" ecosystem is through leveraging of its user base. IMO they've started out a bit heavy-handed in trying to force the Metro UI on everyone, but they have no other viable route into the tablet/handheld ecosystem.

    Windows 8 is not two OS's. It's two UI's for a single OS. "Run in a separate process" (similar in many ways to "sandboxing") has been available since Win2K. That's pretty much the Metro UI and its Tiles in a nutshell, with a few extra limitations thrown in. I've had my hands in the guts of Windows 8, and there's no mine field in the Registry. It is actually easier to take apart and reassemble than Windows 7, and after doing that, everything still works. I didn't have to take apart two OS's - just the one.

    What Microsoft has done makes sense; it's the way they've gone about it that's poked the stick in the hornet's nest.
    Yes, I agree with you too .

    Funny thing is, even with so much criticism and the lack of decent hardware, for the most part, Windows 8 got a 7.5% share of tablet market. Without either mature software and hardware, it's a curious first step!
    Rui
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  11. #11
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    I would say one of the biggest problems was the lack of compelling hardware when Windows 8 was released. The big OEMs had ample opportunity to react to Windows 8 with new hardware designs. Rather than produce something that people are willing to pay a reasonable amount of money for they produce barely workable machines for the least retail price possible.

    Joe

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