Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23
  1. #16
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Good stuff. "Keep with next" looks like the easiest workaround. Sweep select everything but the last cell:

    table1.jpg

    Set the Paragraph>>keep with next. (I also cleared "Widow/orphan" control, but don't know if that contributed anything.) Then you can select the entire "bracket":

    Table2.jpg

    And copy>>past/append to your heart's content and it will always break the way you want.

    table3.jpg

  2. #17
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    Posts
    413
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Catching up on this thread, I tried the "Keep with Next" technique, which I didn't think of when I was trying to solve the problem on my own, but it didn't work. I also tried "Keep Together" again, but it still didn't work. I must sadly conclude that these approaches, if they can be made to work, are not reliable, and NSFW.

    EricFletcher, you proposed a simple and elegant solution, but I've looked at the Table Properties dialog and I don't see how to do that. Is it a new feature in Word 2013?

    I've made floating tables (that's what they're called) before in Word, but I had to create a frame and then put the table in the frame. Creating and maintaining a table that way takes so much work that I don't consider doing it except in cases where I need that result at any cost.

  3. #18
    New Lounger ChuckyB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Faribault, MN
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Uh, simple answer from a simple mind? Sounds like you are concerned about format changes and table(s) moving after making changes in preceding paragraphs? Why not just type something like, "PLACE TABLE #1 HERE" when creating your document and then inserting the table after you are satisfied the rest of the document is in it's completed form/state? At that point, you'd know whether or not the table will break across pages and that you would need to insert a page break to maintain the table's integrity.

  4. #19
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    Posts
    413
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Well, that's another approach, but it doesn't match the way documents are developed in my world. A document is never simply "done" and then released. I write several drafts and release them to individuals for question-answering or informal review. Then I release a version for a formal review. Then I release a final document, but a few months or years later I'm likely to go through the whole process again for a revision. Or worse, my successor is.

    Should I put the table in for each release and take it out again after? Or distribute it for informal reviews with a separate table, which most of the reviewers will find bewildering? In either case, what have I gained over leaving the table in the document? This turns into a way of doing a lot more work and introducing more opportunities for error, without even actually solving the problem.

  5. #20
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    120
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    The "float" option has been available for tables for quite some time, but it isn't as obvious as with other objects.

    To use it, click on the Around button in the "Text wrapping" section of the Tables Properties box. This activates the Positioning... button, which in turn allows you to set parameters for how the table is positioned.

    wsTblPropa.JPG

    In my example above, I set the horizontal position = Outside relative to Margin, and vertical position = Bottom relative to Margin, to specify that the table be placed in the outer bottom corner of a page (i.e. on the right or left depending if the page is odd or even numbered). As you can see below, even though the table is larger than the column width, the text wraps around it to ensure that it is located in the lower outside part of the page.

    wsTblPropb.JPG

    The OP may not be able to use this method if his table is >1 page of course, but it is very useful when you know that a table will be <1 page and when placement is not particularly critical within the flow of the content.

    I routinely use this method to manage photos and captions in duplex-printed books when the design calls for consistent image widths. I create a 2-row table and set Table Properties appropriately (i.e. fixed width, thin border around row 1, preferred position options, etc.). The 1st row is for the photo, and with the "Automatically resize to fit contents" Table Option turned OFF, an inserted image will automatically be resized to fit the table's width. The 2nd row is tagged with a suitable style for a caption. I select the table and save it to an AutoText gallery so I can access it easily whenever I need to insert a captioned floating image.

  6. #21
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    Posts
    413
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    This looks like it could be the best solution suggested so far. Whether it is or not it's a technique I didn't know about before, and I appreciate that.

    I'm going to have to practice with it, though. Ideally I'd like the table to be at the bottom of the page containing the table anchor if possible, and the bottom of the preceding or next page (I'm not sure which) if not. I haven't achieved that so far.

    I tried specifying a vertical position of "bottom." After the table anchor Word put a big patch of white space -- big enough to hold more text, so if Word was trying to float the table, it did it wrong. The table started after the white space, ran over the footing, skipped the next page's heading, and finished in the next page's body.

    That not only isn't what I wanted; it isn't something that anyone could possibly want. That makes me wonder whether I understand what this technique is supposed to do (or, alternately, whether Microsoft understands)!

  7. #22
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    120
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    Be sure the vertical position is Bottom of Margin, and not Page. (Page will overlap the footer.)

    Part of the problem is that MS offers options for all kinds of potential situations. Some just are very esoteric: why would you want to position an object outside of the page's content area? Perhaps a full bleed tab block, or crop marks...

    You may need to drag the anchor up a bit to allow text to flow "past" the table if the anchor would otherwise be too close to where the table will need to start.

  8. #23
    Lounger ruosChalet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Not Solutions -- but Workarounds

    Quote Originally Posted by jsachs177 View Post
    ...

    Apparently the condition "don't allow row to break across pages" is satisfied if any cell in the row is prevented from breaking across pages, and the other cells can break to their hearts' content.

    Have anyone found a workaround for this?
    Hi, jsachs177.
    The problem is each "cell" is in just ONE row. Your larger cells span across six rows, but in Word, as in Excel, the cell is considered to be in the top row of the six rows spanned. Thus, the row doesn't break across pages, but the cell does because it spans more than one row. This is not the desired behavior, of course, but it explains why the "keep lines together" or "keep with next" paragraph options do not solve the problem.

    I've attached two mods of your sample file with workarounds. These work in my Word 2003, so they should work in Word 2010. Note, I reset the paragraph spacing of your first paragraph to 150 pts after so I could simply add or delete a second paragraph to force the table on or off the page.

    In "Test1," I simply merged the cells in the columns opposite "Production" so that all info is in one big row. Had to tweak the paragraph formatting to get the spacing and alignment to resemble the untweaked "Sandbox" row above.

    In "Test2," I used nested tables for the cells in the "Production" row. I've shaded the nested tables to highlight them. The blue is 3 rows by 2 cols and the green is 6 rows by 1 column. I used internal border lines only to approximate the original format.

    Either method takes a bit of tweaking to make it look right, but once formatted, additional rows (with nested subrows) can be copied and inserted. In either example, Word does not break the "Production" row accross the page.

    I agree with you that these are workarounds, not true "solutions." Either method requires some upfront format work and may not be worth the effort. But at least you have a couple more options. Good luck!
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by ruosChalet; 2013-05-28 at 05:02. Reason: Typos

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •