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  1. #1
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    RIPping an audio CD with multiple tracks to one MP3

    I have several audio CDs, each one having one lecture on it. However, the one lecture is divided up into approximately 70 tracks on each CD. Therefore, when I try to RIP the CD into an MP3 file, I get approximately 70 MP3s for each lecture.

    I would like to have just one MP3 for each lecture, rather than 70.

    Does anyone know of a good program I can use either to RIP the CD directly to one MP3, or to combine all the MP3s into one MP3 after the CD is RIPped?

    I prefer a free program, but I'll pay for one if necessary.

  2. #2
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    I found this, but have not used it. http://www.makeitone.net/audio/mp3albummaker.htm
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    mrjimphelps (2013-05-31)

  4. #3
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    MakeItOne looks like it would be very useful for what I'm looking for.

    Since my original posting, I have found a program called Audio Grabber.

    http://www.cnet.com/1990-7899_1-6309584-1.html
    http://download.cnet.com/Audiograbbe...-10262582.html

    It takes an interesting approach: With all of the CDs tracks listed on the screen, you check the properties of the last track -- it tells you the values of the first and last sectors. You note the value of the last sector.

    You then edit the properties of the first track, changing the value of the last sector to match the value you noted from the above step. In other words, the sectors for the first track go from the first sector to the last sector of the entire recording.

    You then rip only the first track.

    This process will produce one track (i.e. one MP3 file) containing the entire recording.

    I'm still ironing out a few kinks in the process, such as increasing the volume on the target MP3 recording.

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Sounds interesting Jim, hope it works for you. Its not a program type that I have need for at present, but will keep it in mind for the future.
    Let me know how it goes.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I plan on nailing this down this weekend. I'll post my findings.

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I've been fiddling around with Audio Grabber, but thus far I haven't found a way for it to produce an MP3 file. Even though you select MP3, it produces a WAV file. (Perhaps it is writing it in an unknown location.)

    Also, I haven't found a way to increase the volume of the MP3 file that is produced. Unfortunately, the original recording didn't have enough volume in it, and when you listen to the WAV file, you have to turn the volume up really high.

    Now I'm moving on to the program you suggested, Make It One. I'll post my findings here.

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    When I started with a computer, I first used Windows Media Player but found it very poor in all respects. I then found Winamp which was so good I bought it. It can rip in many formats / quality & burn to a CD. The only snag is, it can't split or join tracks the way you want it done.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  9. #8
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Although MakeItOne advertises that it can join tracks into one MP3, I haven't been able to figure it out yet.

    It's looking like my best bet at this time is to use Audio Grabber to join all the tracks into one WAV file, and then use a format converter to convert from WAV to MP3. WinAmp sounds like something that would do that, as well as perhaps increase the volume of the recording. That will be my next test.

    Thanks for the info.

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    If there is a lot of variability in an MP3 and it's not a song where that may be intended but a poorly miked conversation for instance, you want a WAV file to process through a program called the Levelator from The Conversations Network. It only accepts wav files to process, then convert to MP3 after it's done. If it just needs uniform gain or reduction throughout then you can use MP3Gain from sourceforge, which can handle MP3 obviously and produces good results. There is another MP3Gain-like program that claims to act as Levelator does at sourceforge that you may be prompted to download instead of MP3Gain but I had terrible results with that program; or I should say, hilarious as it turned everyone into Alvin-style speaking chipmunks!

  11. #10
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    All tracks on the CD have a consistently low volume level. Therefore, MP3Gain would be good for them.

    Here's the situation: I work at a school, and many of the lectures have been recorded to CD. We are trying to extract MP3 files from the CDs, so that we will have an MP3 copy of each lecture.

    I have checked two of the classes so far, and both of them are multi-track for each lecture. I will definitely want to combine the tracks into one MP3 file.

    I have listened to two of the WAV files that I produced using Audio Grabber, and the volume was consistently low in both of the WAV files. But I don't know if that is the case for all classes. My guess is that the Levelator might be able to tell me how loud the volume will be, without my having to listen to the WAV file. (It probably has a meter.)

    Therefore, if I use Audio Grabber to produce the WAV files, I could probably then use the Levelator to make the volume levels appropriate.

    Hopefully the Levelator will save in MP3 format; if so, I've got all pieces of the puzzle solved.

  12. #11
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    Better if I provide my usage scenarios maybe. I edit some old AM radio recordings of the CBS Radio Mystery Theater. There might be static from a passing thunderstorm or other electrical spikes and the bass is real muddy and tends to overmodulate and commercials would sometimes sound twice as loud as the main program (and I kind of like hearing some of the old commercials also) and from segment to segment the recording might get weaker or stronger. So, I choose the midway point at about 90dB for the edited wav output but there may be spikes up to 110 or more and dropoffs to 70 or less. So before I scrunch the file up into MP3 format I run it through Levelator and everything gets closer to 90dB for a better spoken word earbud listening experience.


    I use MP3Gain on almost all the podcasts I download because they're mostly all over the map, usually too quiet for mobile listening (I like 90-93 dB when working) but some are too loud as well. MP3Gain will turn a consistent 85 dB podcast into a consistent 93 dB podcast and that gives me consistency in player volume no matter what I'm listening to when I'm out and about. I won't really detect any clipping unless the podcast sound was really low and uncompressed, like 81 dB or so, which I've run into. Also, my volume button doesn't really work anymore so I'm stuck in one position anyway!

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  14. #12
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    In my situation, all of the lectures for a particular class will likely be at the same volume level, because the same recorder and recording process was used for all lectures for a particular class. And there will be around 20 WAV files for each class, when I have combined the tracks into WAV files.

    Therefore, MP3Gain would probably be the best choice for my situation, because I will know right away if the volume will be too low for the entire class -- all lectures will likely be consistent with each other.

    Much thanks for the useful info. I'll post my results here.

  15. #13
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    I like Goldwave (Goldwave.com). It can rip CD's, record and edit audio tracks, combine tracks, split tracks, convert file types, and much more. Free to download and try.
    To make mp3's, you need an add-in called LAME (lame.sourceforge.net, download free). Copy lame_enc.dll to the Goldwave folder.

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  17. #14
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    Mrjim-

    I've used makeitone, and it does the trick. You need to make sure you highlight all the files you want to join, then do the join. If the volume level is too low, you might want to look at mp3gain; It's a normalizer that adjusts the volume level lossless, so you can always go back without loss of quality.

    I also noted that cnet has mp3merge listed which seems to have decent reviews.

    -Steve C

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  19. #15
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    I use mergemp3 from http://www.shchuka.com/software/mergemp3/ It's free. I discovered it when I needed to copy an audiobook CD to MP3. I use http://www.mediamonkey.com/ to do the ripping and then mergemp3 to do the joining.

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