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  1. #1
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    How to move Win8 Pro to a new build

    With the release of the Haswell processors, I want to build a new computer with the new i7. I bought Win8 Pro when MS was offering the $40 promotion, so I assume it can be transferred to the new machine. Is the only way to start with the install disk (I burned one when I bought Win8)? Does it then validate with MS? I sort of don't know what to expect or if there is any particular approach to installing it. I would prefer to simply make an image of the C: drive and then burn it to the new machine, but I doubt that would work with both the mobo and processor changed. Advice?

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    The $40 promotion was for the Upgrade Media. In other words there has to be a qualifying OS on the HD to qualify for this pricing. This Upgrade Media may be clean installed over the original OS, but it does need the Qualifying OS.

    If the Win 8 Pro was installed on another PC, it would have to be removed from there and installed on the new PC. I am unsure what problems you may encounter during validation. You might have to call MS to get it activated. The Image of the old PC may or may not work on the new PC because of the hardware differences.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks. I have the Win7 disk that was used for the upgrade and have the Win8 disk (burned from the ISO), so I suppose I will just try installing and see what happens.

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    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    It is possible to migrate an image from metal to metal. The installation from the host hardware would no longer be valid. It's not a simple procedure when the hardware is considerably different, but not impossible.

    Much simpler to do a straight-up upgrade from a qualifying OS.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  5. #5
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    What Medico states above is the legal situation. It may be possible (you could look around on the Web) to install your Win 8 Pro upgrade without an existing qualifying OS on the new machine, but that's definitely a violation of its license (EULA).

    (It's definitely possible to use the Win 8 Release Preview as a 'qualifying OS' for the Win 8 Pro Upgrade despite the fact that the EULA does not mention this, and the fact that official Microsoft blogs indicated that this was legitimate may make it relatively legal as well.)

    Other aspects of what constitutes a legal 'qualifying OS' are murkier (the Upgrade EULA doesn't clarify them). You could try just making a copy on the new machine of the pre-existing OS that you upgraded on your old machine (or, for that matter, a copy of a qualifying OS from ANY machine that you're no longer using) and see whether the Upgrade accepts this for a 'clean install' (you wouldn't want to retain anything from it) even though it may not actually run on the new hardware and may have been an OEM installation (which cannot legally be RUN on another machine - but you're not running it there, just copying it there as you legally could, e.g., to preserve a backup copy). I think that it's clearer that if you succeed in this you cannot legally continue to use the original OS on the machine it came from after having used it as the basis for installing the Upgrade on the new machine, though I don't know whether Microsoft has any mechanism that would detect this.

    Microsoft does notice if you try to activate Windows on a machine after you've already activated it using the same product key on another machine, but for retail versions of Windows (which your Upgrade is) will allow you to do this as long as you certify that it has been removed from the machine upon which you previously activated it. You can then no longer legally continue to run that old installation and I suspect that Microsoft has mechanisms that could detect this (though if you disabled all Win 8's 'phone home' facilities and avoided Updates on the old installation it might not notice).

    As for simply making a copy of your C: drive and trying to use it on your new hardware, if it would run at all I suspect that it would no longer be activated due to the hardware differences. So you would have to go through the same kind of process I just described above, and if you need to do that anyway you'd probably be better off starting with a 'clean' installation rather than getting stuck with a lot of old installed content that was relevant only to the old system.

    Sorry for all the 'I suspect'-style qualifications above, but while I have experience with them on earlier Windows versions I don't specifically on Win 8. Hope they're of some help.


    Edit: Another of the murky aspects of the Win 8 Pro Upgrade EULA is that it does not specify that the qualifying OS need be activated (though, again, I haven't experimented with this). So you could try just installing from your Win 7 disk without entering a product key or activating the result, which if successfully upgraded would eliminate the question of whether you could legally (whether this would be ethical is a different question) continue using your Win 7 system on the old machine (though you'd still have to remove the Win 8 Pro Upgrade from it to be legal).
    Last edited by - bill; 2013-06-02 at 19:21.

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    Thanks for the comments guys. What I would like to do is to put the Win8 install disk in the new machine and expect it to ask me to then insert the old Win7 disk as the qualifying upgrade. If it would then verify that I have the qualifying disk and proceed to load Win8, all would be happy. Of course, when I first installed Win8, it was on top of an already installed Win7 OEM (I have that install disk to show as the qualifying OS). I hope that I will not have to install Win7 on the new machine at all.

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    I think Microsoft changed things yet again in that area and the upgrade DVD will no longer install without a qualifying OS being present on the disk.

    Excerpt from the Internets;

    Important: You can only install Windows 8 (clean install or upgrade install) using an upgrade license if you currently have a copy of Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP installed on the computer. True, the clean install process involves removing that operating system, but it still has to be there when the Windows 8 setup process begins.

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I believe F.U.N. is correct. The method for verifying that a qualifying OS is present is different from previous versions of Windows. If you have the Win 7 installation media, you will most likely have to install Win 7 (does not need to be activated or updated) then Custom Install Win 8 over it. I would choose to format the disk from within the Win 8 installation. After choosing Custom Install the next screen has a link to Advanced (Drive) Options. Choose the disk you just installed Win 7 on and highlight it, then choose format. Once formatted the Win 8 installation will continue as on a blank disk. This is how I installed Win 8 Pro on both our PCs. I did make a final Win 7 Image, but in your case that should not be necessary since this is a new PC to start with.
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    Okay, it looks like the simplest approach won't work, so I will try installing Win7 first. I think Medico's idea of formatting is a good one, since it will hopefully give the same result as installing on a blank drive.

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    Bob

    I don't want to be negative, but I think that a Windows 7 OEM is supposed to be licensed for one machine, and I don't think you are supposed to be able to activate it on a different machine. And worse, I think the Windows 8 upgrade package has the same restriction. I don't think Microsoft will activate it if it has already been activated on your old machine.

    On the other hand, what are they going to do? I don't think they will come to your house and arrest you, so you may as well give it a try. If you can't activate it on your new computer, you should be able to continue using it on the old one. Don't format that hard drive.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    The Windows 8 Pro Upgrade only upgrades an installed qualifying OS. The Windows 8 Pro Upgrade downloaded from Microsoft is a Retail license - this means that it can be removed from one machine and installed on an entirely different machine without violating the EULA. Yes, it does work. Yes, I have done it. No, I did not have to call Microsoft - it validated/activated online.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    No, I did not have to call Microsoft - it validated/activated online.
    That's certainly convenient, but I think that's a change from previous behavior. It would be interesting to know whether this is because Win 8 has mechanisms for being deactivated remotely if Microsoft discovers that the old machine on which it was first installed is still in service - because otherwise this would seem to make pirating Windows significantly easier and that's not something I would expect.


    Edit: In that vein, a quick Google failed to turn up a direct answer but did remind me that Microsoft does have the ability to deactivate any 'App' remotely (though not exactly how: possibly via a Microsoft Update?), so the idea is certainly not a stretch.
    Last edited by - bill; 2013-06-03 at 18:48.

  13. #13
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Yes, it does work. Yes, I have done it. No, I did not have to call Microsoft - it validated/activated online.
    I did this while connected via broadband to the internet. When initiating the installation, the Product Key must be entered, and there is a pause while the Product Key is validated. Once validated, installation proceeds, and after the final restart in the process, Windows boots up activated.

    The Product Key I entered was no longer in use, as I had reverted the previous Windows 8 upgraded machine to Windows 7 by restoring drive images made immediately prior to the upgrade.

    The pertinent section of the EULA for Windows 8 Pro Upgrade:


    Can I transfer the software to another computer or user? You may transfer the software to another computer that belongs to you. You may also transfer the software (together with the license) to a computer owned by someone else if a) you are the first licensed user of the software and b) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. To make that transfer, you must transfer the original media, the certificate of authenticity, the product key and the proof of purchase directly to that other person, without retaining any copies of the software. You may use the backup copy we allow you to make or the media that the software came on to transfer the software. Anytime you transfer the software to a new computer, you must remove the software from the prior computer. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between computers. You may transfer Get Genuine Windows software, Pro Pack or Media Center Pack software only together with the licensed computer.

    How does Internet activation work? The first time you connect to the Internet while using the software, the software will automatically contact Microsoft or its affiliate to confirm the software is genuine, and the license is associated with the licensed computer. This process is called “activation.” Because activation is meant to identify unauthorized changes to the licensing or activation functions of the software, and to otherwise prevent unlicensed use of the software, you may not bypass or circumvent activation.


    --- edit --- Let me further clarify by saying that the Windows 7 on the machine I first upgraded to Windows 8 Pro Upgrade was Windows 7 Home OEM. The drive images I restored to remove Windows 8 Pro Upgrade from the machine were of Windows 7 Ultimate Retail (Full Install).
    Last edited by bbearren; 2013-06-03 at 19:32. Reason: clarity
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  14. #14
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    bbearren - Thank you. I think I understand and my situation is identical to yours. When I installed Win8 Pro, it was the $40 promotional deal, so I assume it is transferrable. I had Win7 OEM installed and used that as my qualifying earlier version.

    Do I have the process correct as --- I must install the Win7 OEM on my new build, then install the Win8 Pro to the same new machine. Naturally, I have the produce codes for both. I sort of assume that I should install the Win7 OEM with no internet connection, then turn on the internet connection when the Win8 install starts. Right?

    I also own a non-OEM version of Win7, which I plan to install on the machine that is presently running Win8. It will be a clean install and, since it is a retail version, I assume it will not encounter any problems.

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    Ya, it'll work that way, the only hitch in legality is if the Win 7 OEM is from the other system and not a new "builder's" license purchased for that system. I used an unlicensed copy of W7 to kick start my VM install of W8 so I'm not judging.

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