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    Win7: Sharing a wireless printer

    I've got Win 7 Home Premium on 2 PC's (separate rooms) that are ethernet hard wired to a AT&T DSL wireless modem. I've also got a wireless printer operating in wireless mode in the room where the modem is. I want to give the other PC access to the wireless printer. Neither PC has a wireless card.

    What's the simplest way to do this? I have no need to set up a Homegroup but could do it. Can it also be done with just networking? Printer also will not be used too much so it stays powered down a lot if that matters.

    I'm pretty computer savy but not so much in wireless connectivity issues.
    Ed

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    The printer is self contained and all you need to do is tell each PC to connect to it directly. The best option is to use the wireless router to reserve the IP address of the printer, then the PCs will always find it.
    On the PCs select Start > Devices and Printers.
    Select "Add a printer" > "Add a network..."
    Windows will do the rest.

    cheers, Paul

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    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    As long as each PC is connected to your router (i.e. your DSL modem), and as long as the printer is connected to the router, all computers will be able to print to the printer. They are all connected via the router; none are connected to each other directly.

    Any and all connections can be wireless or wired, or a mixture of the two. As long as they are all connected to the router.

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    Thanks for the info, guys. The DSL wireless modem I have is a Netgear ADSL2+ 7500 modem. How do I reserve the IP address of the printer??? Trying to use google to find out but no luck yet.
    Ed

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    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    First you have to set an IP address on the printer, so that you'll know which one to reserve.

    Pick a high number, such as x.x.x.200.

    Now go into your router and specify the range to assign, such as x.x.x.2 to x.x.x.199. It will never assign an address higher than 199, and you can use the ones at 200 and above for "permanent" IP addresses, such as for your printer.

    Once you have done the above, your printer will have its own IP address on your network. Now, when you install the printer driver on each computer, you can find the printer using the IP address. Since the IP address for the printer will never change, and since each computer uses the IP address to find the printer, you will always have a trouble-free link to your printer.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2013-06-03 at 13:34.

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    In looking at the "connection configuration" section on the router, it shows the "DHCP start IP address" as 192.168.1.64 and the "DHCP end IP address" as 192.168.1.253. AT&T uses 192.168.1.254 as the IP address for their router setup. I'm assuming because of this info, I should use something like 192.168.1.299
    Ed

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Y View Post
    Thanks for the info, guys. The DSL wireless modem I have is a Netgear ADSL2+ 7500 modem. How do I reserve the IP address of the printer??? Trying to use google to find out but no luck yet.
    What brand is your printer?
    I have never needed to reserve an IP for my wireless printer and never had difficulties with computers finding the printer - the printer drivers and software deal with that. Just install whatever software that came with the printer in each of the computers, turn on the printer while you do that, making sure it is connected to the wireless network.

    IPs are made up of 4 octets, which means the value of each cannot be higher than 255 and 255 should not be used. I really wouldn't worry about the IP.
    Rui
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    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Y View Post
    In looking at the "connection configuration" section on the router, it shows the "DHCP start IP address" as 192.168.1.64 and the "DHCP end IP address" as 192.168.1.253. AT&T uses 192.168.1.254 as the IP address for their router setup. I'm assuming because of this info, I should use something like 192.168.1.299
    If you leave the range as-is, you should have a bunch of available IP addresses below the specified range -- 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.63. Out of habit I avoid using 1, so you should have 2 to 63 available to use for the printer. There may be devices using some of those IP addresses, but I think you're safe if you stay near the top, e.g., you could use 192.168.1.60 for your printer.

    You can't go above 255, so 299 wouldn't be a valid number. Besides, since your router is using 254, you don't want to go above 253, lest you conflict with the IP address the router has.

    In case you're curious, the real number that the computer is using is all 0's and 1's, i.e., binary (base-2). When all the bits are 1's, the number equals 255 in plain English. When all the bits are 0's, the number equals 0 in plain English. If I remember correctly, there are 32 bits in a byte, and since you can fit only 32 1's, it can't be higher than 255.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2013-06-03 at 16:16.

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    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    What brand is your printer?
    I have never needed to reserve an IP for my wireless printer and never had difficulties with computers finding the printer - the printer drivers and software deal with that. Just install whatever software that came with the printer in each of the computers, turn on the printer while you do that, making sure it is connected to the wireless network.

    IPs are made up of 4 octets, which means the value of each cannot be higher than 255 and 255 should not be used. I really wouldn't worry about the IP.
    In most home networks, you don't need to worry about using an IP address to successfully locate the printer on the network. However, I have done tons of printers on large corporate networks, and it's just easier and less trouble to set a permanent IP address for the printer, and then use the IP address to locate the printer. Therefore, after years of setting up networked printers on large corporate networks, I have the habit of always using an IP address to set up a networked printer.

    There was one case in a home network that I needed to use the IP address to find the printer on the network -- it was an HP printer/scanner/copier, but I don't recall the model number. It was a wired, not a wireless printer. No matter what I did, the software couldn't find the printer on the network. I then set up an IP address on the printer and did a manual search for it, using the IP address. It found it immediately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    In most home networks, you don't need to worry about using an IP address to successfully locate the printer on the network. However, I have done tons of printers on large corporate networks, and it's just easier and less trouble to set a permanent IP address for the printer, and then use the IP address to locate the printer. Therefore, after years of setting up networked printers on large corporate networks, I have the habit of always using an IP address to set up a networked printer.

    There was one case in a home network that I needed to use the IP address to find the printer on the network -- it was an HP printer/scanner/copier, but I don't recall the model number. It was a wired, not a wireless printer. No matter what I did, the software couldn't find the printer on the network. I then set up an IP address on the printer and did a manual search for it, using the IP address. It found it immediately.
    I agree, Jim, home networks are simpler and in corporate networks it's usually a better use of resources to use reserved IPs. The current generation of wireless printers do seem very easy to use, I was rather pleasantly surprised how easy it was to add one to my network.
    Rui
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    Thanks again, guys. I'm gonna work on it this evening. I had forgotten about the IP addressing and hexidecimal. Worked in the mainframe computer field from 1963 until 1990 when I retired. Lotta water over the dam since then and had forgotten about hex addressing.

    I'm gonna just set it up without assigning a unique IP address and see what happens 1st. If it works fine for a few days, I'll leave it alone, if not, I'll assign the printer an address.
    The printer is a HP Officejet 6500a Plus by the way.
    Ed

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    Ok, let us know how it goes. Not sure why, I think HPs are slightly harder to configure...
    Rui
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    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Ok, let us know how it goes. Not sure why, I think HPs are slightly harder to configure...
    HP is used more than anything else in the corporate world, where there are IT personnel available to set up the printers and the network. My guess is that HP is thinking of this scenario when they design their printers.

    Other companies, like Brother, likely think of the home user when they design their printers. That's why they are easier to set up, in my opinion.

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    HP network printers used to be harder to set up, but that was about 10 years ago. These days they are a doddle.

    cheers, Paul

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    Everything working great as a network printer. No problems of any kind yet. I have shutdown both PC's, booted up with printer on and off, and all seems good. No problems with finding IP address. I'll just continue this way and won't assign a dedicated address unless problems show up later. I do get this msg "The print spooler failed to share printer HP Officejet 6500 E710n-z with shared resource name HP Officejet 6500 E710n-z. Error 2114. The printer cannot be used by others on the network." on boot up with the printer powered off but would think that's normal and nothing to worry.


    Thanks again for the help.
    Ed

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