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  1. #16
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Late to the party here, just saw this listed in the newsletter.

    One guess is that the original CPU damaged the 1st and 2nd motherboards (not something I've seen for ~10 years, but it happens).

    If I'm reading the ASUS CPU page for that 'board correctly, your CPU requires the motherboard PCB revision 1.00G and the BIOS level of 0203 - again, from what I can tell there, that equates to the oldest PCB and the oldest listed BIOS. That doesn't imply that either were the earliest versions to escape from the plant. Check the markings on the 'board and update the BIOS.

    'Simple' things; are you using a 80 connector IDE cable, have you swapped it out for a new one, are the drives jumpered correctly, have you tried an install to a single drive, tried an install to a SATA drive, tried a different DVD drive or an install from USB etc.

    As to W7 not installing on an IDE drive - it will and it has IDE drivers ready to load, even if it doesn't have the exact one, the generic MS driver works fine.

    0x124s occur because the hardware itself, usually the CPU, reports that it has picked up an internal failure; sometimes that internal failure isn't real but is triggered by a bad driver, faulty BIOS, overheating, badly applied or non-existant thermal grease on the CPU heatsink etc.

    A good walkthrough on steps to take when confronted by this bugcheck is here: http://www.sevenforums.com/crash-loc...-what-try.html

  2. #17
    Silver Lounger
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    Ah, yes, never had a bad CPU myself but I did have a bad PSU take out the replacement motherboard before I realized it was the PSU, so I think that's a good guess; some component that has gone bad and replicates the same error/damage.

  3. #18
    3 Star Lounger
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    Reading through the list of components you had tested or replaced .... what about the hard drive? Did you try a new hard drive? Or did I miss that?

  4. #19
    Lounger
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    You might review this article (from the sevenforums) to see if it helps:

    http://www.sevenforums.com/crash-loc...-what-try.html

  5. #20
    Lounger
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    Only just spotted this: I bought a bare-bones ASUS PC with this motherboard about a year ago, and had endless blue-screens with the original memory I purchased (EXTRA VALUE 4GB (2x2GB) DDR3 1333MHz Memory Kit 1.5V CL9 from a reliable UK supplier). The memory wasn't on the ASUS QVL, but I couldn't find any that was, since the QVL dated back to 2009. I purchased replacement memory (CT2KIT25664BD1339, 1.35V) from Crucial, using a compatibility checker, but this was even worse - couldn't even get a BIOS display. Emails with Crucial suggested that these 'low voltage' modules may not be compatible, so they swapped them for 1.5V ones (CT2KIT25664BA1339) which have worked flawlessly since.

    I did run tests with MemTest86+ on the 'Value' memory, which showed occasional faults, but then the BSODs stopped for a while, so I thought it had cured itself (ever the optimist). The good Crucial memory gave no faults. I suggest you try an 'as installed' memory test - although your memory may be Ok when tested in another PC, it may not be compatible. Hope this helps!
    Last edited by mngerhold; 2013-06-13 at 13:26. Reason: Add memtest bit

  6. #21
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    Dear all,

    Many thanks for your ideas. It may be best to summarise the steps taken so far again, and since the lounge got involved.

    PC specification is below:
    Motherboard: Asus M4A78LT-M LE AM3 AMD760G MATX
    Memory: Kingston 1GB 1333MHz DDR3 Non-ECC CL9 DIMM (2 sticks)
    Processor: AMD ADX245OCGQBOX
    Hard drive: Seagate 500GB (IDE) (2 installed)
    SATA DVD drive
    No PCI cards or other peripherals.

    Issue:
    PC was crashing to BSOD code 0124 regularly, and/or locking up.

    Actions taken:
    PSU replaced - No effect
    Motherboard returned for checking - Fault reported and replacement provided
    Installed new Motherboard - Fault persisted
    Returned memory for checking - No faults found even on weekend soak test
    Returned processor to AMD - Fault found and replacement provided
    Installed new processor - fault persisted.
    Backed up data, and performed full low level format of boot drive
    Reinstalled Windows 7 - Installation failed with BSOD code 0124
    Tried to install Windows XP - Installation failed with BSOD code 0124 again

    Since the Lounge's involvement I've tried the following:
    Tried to install Windows 7 (original disks) for both 32bit and 64bit, and new 64bit SP1 downloaded from Digital River.
    Removed each hard drive in turn and tried to install to the remaining drive.
    Pulled one memory stick in turn and tried the install again.
    Checked IDE is 80 pin (confirmed)
    Updated the BIOS after clearing the CMOS and loaded all safe default settings.
    Noticed I'd left a SD reader plugged into one USB, disconnected it, repeated earlier attempts.
    Changed the SATA IDE settings in the BIOS

    I don't think I've missed anything.

    I hate to say it, but it's looking increasingly like I'll need to start the replacement process with the hardware vendors again. Any advice on what the most likely second failure might be. Last time I changed PSU, MoBo and Memory, CPU in this order. I could try a different order, or try to replace all at once

    Many thanks again for your ideas,
    D.

  7. #22
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I still can't determine from this thread weather you've thoroughly checked your hard drives.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  8. #23
    New Lounger
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    Hi Clint,

    Both drives have been tested and reformatted using the Seatools utility.

    Cheers,
    D.

  9. #24
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Hi Donchik.

    Motherboard returned for checking - Fault reported and replacement provided
    Installed new Motherboard - Fault persisted
    ...
    Returned processor to AMD - Fault found and replacement provided
    Installed new processor - fault persisted.
    As I suggested back in #16, it's looking like the original (defective) CPU damaged both motherboards.

    I'd try to push to have both motherboard and CPU replaced.

  10. #25
    Star Lounger
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    Memory testing using memchk should never show any errors unless they are bad, overheated, or have bad sockets. Please check it.

  11. #26
    Star Lounger
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    I would burn a Linux ISO to a DVD, such as the one provided by Ubuntu Linux, and then use it to boot the system and run its programs, get on the web using its Firefox browser, etc. If you can't use the boot disc (with the BIOS set to having the DVD drive as the first boot device), then its almost certainly a hardware fault. If Ubuntu works, then it's a problem with Windows 7 and XP - maybe both install discs were damaged, etc.

  12. #27
    New Lounger
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    Cool, I'll give it a go over the coming weekend, and report back.

    Thanks for the idea.
    D.

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