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  1. #1
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    Need help equalizing volume on single mp3

    I have several interviews and who ever set up the sound did a terrible job. One person is so loud you have to turn the volume down an other is so quite you can't turn the volume up enough. I've tried Goldwave and it kind of worked but I still have really low volume passages. Any suggestions? I need something simple I have to much on my plate already.

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    Levelator will help a ton but you'll need to convert the file to wav to run it through and then convert it back to MP3. I use Switch for that.

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    Thanks!

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    Try Audio Grabber, along with the LAME MP3 add in. Both are available from Audio Grabber's web site. (I believe it's www.audiograbber.org.)

    If you have a CD with inconsistent volume (really low sometimes), you can select "Norm" (normalize) in Audio Grabber, and it will fix the problem, producing an excellent quality MP3.

    I'm not sure if you can use an MP3 as your source, or if your source needs to be a CD. I suppose you could burn the original MP3 to a CD, then run the CD through Audio Grabber.

    Audio Grabber is freeware, and it will fix the volume problem if the source is a CD; so if you must first burn the MP3 to a CD to get it to work, it would be worth it.

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    mrjimphelps the problem isn't going from track to track it's in the individual tracks. Say there are 4 people being interviewed. One is to loud, the next is so low that you can't turn the volume up enough and the other two are OK.

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Check Marc View Post
    mrjimphelps the problem isn't going from track to track it's in the individual tracks. Say there are 4 people being interviewed. One is to loud, the next is so low that you can't turn the volume up enough and the other two are OK.
    I had produced a single WAV file using Audio Grabber, and I had volume problems like you are having in the WAV file. I then downloaded and installed the LAME MP3 encoder, and reran the RIP, this time RIPping it to MP3 and choosing Normalize. The resultant MP3 file had near perfect audio.

    That's why I'm suggesting that, if you don't find another way to fix the audio, you might try burning what you have to an audio CD, then using Audio Grabber to normalize the audio as it is RIPping it to an MP3 file.

    That is, if there's not a way to use the MP3 file you now have as the source file for Audio Grabber. If there is, you probably could normalize the volume by "RIPping" from the bad MP3 file to another MP3 file.

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    MP3Gain (http://mp3gain.sourceforge.net/) is your answer. FREE, fast, simple and works directly on the mp3 file. I have been using it for years to adjust volume on music mp3's.
    Last edited by Blue Moon; 2013-06-27 at 08:50.

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    I appreciate the input and I must not be making myself clear. I have several mp3 that are interviews. These are any where from 45 minutes to 1 hour long. There are 4 or more people being interviewed. The mic levels are not set correctly so the vary from almost unintelligible to over-modulated on each of these mp3s. So the problem isn't the volume varying form mp3 to mp3 but during the single mp3. I have mp3gain and replay gain to I can fix the variation from mp3 to mp3 it's the variation that happen on a single mp3 from one interviewee to another.

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    most any DAW can do it fairly easily
    audacity is free and eas yto use but may not do mp3 directly
    other free ones are out there
    see the list on wikipedia

    wav files are much better and using mp3 destroys quality to save HD space which is silly these days
    convert to mp3 at the end if you must distribute mp3 format

    just display the wave form
    select each of the low parts and raise them up to the same level as the loud parts
    by increasing the gain or equivalent command

    NOTE nothing will process the entire wave form to make them all equal level
    you will have to do it person by persons speakign segment yourself
    but it should only take a few minutes total

    you can then normalise them to about -6dbFS and apply compression to further make them sound equivalent

    normalise back to -6dbFS
    then adjust volume on playback to suit
    both people shoudl be at nearly same level

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    Quote Originally Posted by Check Marc View Post
    mrjimphelps the problem isn't going from track to track it's in the individual tracks. Say there are 4 people being interviewed. One is to loud, the next is so low that you can't turn the volume up enough and the other two are OK.
    you will have to go through the final wave file and find the spots where the low people are speaking and raise them up separately

    there is NO MAGIC CURE to just batch process the entire file

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Moon View Post
    MP3Gain (http://mp3gain.sourceforge.net/) is your answer. FREE, fast, simple and works directly on the mp3 file. I have been using it for years to adjust volume on music mp3's.
    but doesnt that file still leave the one low speakers voice too low

    you really need to adjust the file person by person to increase the gain on JUST the low speakers

    then you can normalise and compress after fixing that problem

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    see the other posts for how to fix it

    then get a mixer board and more mikes for each person (about $250-350 total // what is your time worth?)
    and adjust the recording to be at correct levels
    so you dont have to fix it later

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    MP3 Gain Pro

    You need MP3 Gain Pro for this problem. Here is a description from the website:

    Mp3Gain PRO does not change the volume level of a song in a uniform way, as classic programs did.

    Mp3Gain PRO do not simply scan the entire song, trying to identify the volume peaks, just to amplify the entire song at an overall new volume level. This method does not provide the results required to solve volume level problems for modern equipment or situations.
    Mp3Gain PRO acts in a completely new way, doing a thorough analysis of every millisecond of every song. It also analyzes each frequency, by detecting the internal dynamics of volume. To adjust fine, thousands of times per second, the volume levels of each frequency and each instrument (or vocals), so the end result is bright and clear.


    It does work as promised (I've used it for several years now). And, while it is a paid program, if I remember correctly you can "normalize" several files for free before paying. And no, I don't work for this company. Just a guy who saw your problem and thought I would offer my suggestion. It does not change your original file but saves a new "normalized" copy of it so you will have both--if you want them. And yes, this works great for music MP3 files but I see no reason it wouldn't work with your audio MP3 file just a s well. I originally bought this so I wouldn't have to constantly change the volume knob in my car while listening to my iPod or CD's.

    Here is the website if you're interested:

    http://www.mp3gain-pro.com/mp3normalizer.html

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    Again thanks but the issues isn't the volume difference between mp3s!!! This isn't anything I recorded because it wouldn't have had the problem becuase I would have mic'd/mixed it correctly.

    I have ONE mp3 that is an interview with 4 people. People 1 the volume is fine, people 2 the volume is over saturated, 3 is a little low but audible and lastly people 4 is barely discernible.

    Neither MP3Gain or Replay Gain will fix this problem. I've been busy so I haven't had a chance to Levelator and I'm have some concerns about the loss of quality, on an already poor quality mp3, with the converting the mp3 to a WAV and then back to an mp3.

  15. #15
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    You won't lose anything going to WAV and then upon converting to MP3 again, keep it at 128 kps minimum. I use variable from 24-80 and it usually averages about 67 kbs for mono at the highest quality. Since it's voice only there won't be any noticeable reduction in quality (music would be another matter).

    If the recording is pretty poor quality to boot, the free program Audacity has some wonderful filters for cleaning up background noise or muddy bass and things like that, though I've only heard the results and not really worked with it personally since I try to get good recordings to begin my editing with.

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