Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida, USA
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    52
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Unhappy Disable MS Security Essentials

    Is it possible to keep MS Security Essentials installed, but disable it from running at the worst possible time?
    Many times when I power up my PC (I turn my PC off overnight), MSE decides to download and install the
    latest update file. That ties up my PC pretty tightly and I can't do much if anything until it completes its
    update. I would like to power up and not have MSE running.
    Anyone - help.

    flavet
    Dell Inspiron 15R, 8GB, Win7 Home Premium 64bit SP1
    All help truly appreciated!

  2. #2
    4 Star Lounger SpywareDr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Riviera Beach, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    490
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 52 Times in 43 Posts
    Try limiting MSE's CPU usage. Load MSE, click the Settings tab, make sure the check/tick-mark is in the box next to Limit CPU usage and then set it to something like say 20%. You could also change the day and time when it performs a scan or, disable the scheduled scan completely.

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida, USA
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    52
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks, SpywareDr,

    I just reset my settings. That seems very likely to do what I want. Please note that I could not have established a low percent if I opted to not do a scheduled scan. No matter. I scheduled a 3 a.m. scan, which will seldom or ever run at that time because I am usually abed then.
    Again, thanks.
    Dell Inspiron 15R, 8GB, Win7 Home Premium 64bit SP1
    All help truly appreciated!

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger SpywareDr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Riviera Beach, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    490
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 52 Times in 43 Posts
    No problem.

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Here is something else I want to know about MSE. I have an older machine (WinXPPro) that somehow got PC Performer 2013. This was a fake and did not display in the Add/Remove list. It was difficult to finally remove this thing. But, my complaint is: Why couldn't MSE locate this fake? It has been around for months and I am quite disappointed that MS has not proven itself as an anti-virus leader for consumers. I could not eliminate it with AVG, either. Finally got an app called SpyHunter and it got rid of the fake PC Performer 2013. Being that the program was not in the Add/Remove list, IObit Uninstaller could not be used...this is a really good, free program.

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    301
    Thanks
    65
    Thanked 39 Times in 30 Posts
    As reported elsewhere in the forum, anti-virus software is never 100% effective by itself. You already experience it. You may have to run several anti-virus, anti-rootkit, anti-spyware, anti-malware, anti-special ... software to be effective. No one software is 100%. Remember, anti-something software is reactive, not pro-active:
    First comes virus or malware, then a solution to rid of it.

    Pro-active is better but virus and malware are always one step ahead. My own solution is virtualization and sandbox.
    1. Sandbox: Run or install new program sandboxed. Observe its behavior. Re do the installation if it is good. Portable apps is far easier to use and observe when sandboxed.
    To prevent drive-by infection when browsing the Internet, sandbox your browser. Or use Google Chrome which is sandboxed.
    2. Virtualization: Install new software in virtualized OS. If it misbehaves, simply delete the snapshot (the backup), or the entire virtual OS. Or leave it alone. As long as the virtual OS is not running, no harm done. The mother/parent OS is clean and not infected.

    For 32-bit Windows OS only (not for 64-bit OS):
    free and portable virtualized XP: google PrayayaV3. It is completely portable. Can be run from a USB drive or simply from a folder in C: drive. In my experience, PrayayaV3 (XP) does not leave any trace in your PC if you run from a USB device.
    Option: MS virtualized XP. MS version is not portable.
    For both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows OSes, try Sun/Oracle Virtualbox, or Vmware. They are harder to install and use but more complete in functions.

    There is portable version of Virtualbox. No need to install. Great to try it out.
    Do **NOT** run portable Virtualbox in a PC that has Virtualbox install version. Doing it will render the installed version not function, as well as the portable version. You'd risk losing everything inside Virtualbox. This is because the portable version driver and installed version driver have conflict. (Yes, portable Virtualbox needs to write to C: drive re drivers.) Recovery is possible but it'll be another topic.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thank you, scaisson. My new box, which I built three months ago, runs Win7Pro 64-bit. I have always wanted to use VMware but wasn't ready to put out the money for the real deal. The WinXPPro box is my backup for now. I have an HP Pavilion 17" laptop with Win7Pro 64-bit, also. If you have any suggestions about using VMware, or something comparable, please let me know. The sandbox idea is a good idea. When I studied for networking, a DMZ and sandbox were highly regarded. Thank you again for responding.

  8. #8
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    A simple way to use limited sandboxing and also raise Windows XP protections is to use a HIPS Firewall from a Third Party.

    I use Comodo Personal Firewall Free Edition, without any of their antivirus components, but with their Comodo DNS service. This plus using Firefox or Chrome with appropriate anti-Flash and anti-Script plugins and DoNotTrack Plus or AdBlock Plus, will often prevent downloading and installing viable versions of Fake Antivirus malicious software. Not 100 percent effective, but if MSE is replaced with Avast Free Antivirus, and Malwarebytes Free is used for Full Scans once in awhile, most of the time all is well with my old Windows XP laptop.

    All of these programs and plugins are readily obtainable, free to use, and much of their configuration and updating can be done automatically. Comodo Sandboxing can be invoked on-demand, or it will kick in automatically if anything suspicious tries to get started. Comodo DNS may make it more difficult for malicious software to target your IP Address. If you prefer someone else's DNS Service, OpenDNS is just fine, maybe better than Comodo DNS.

    I don't think Comodo Sandboxing is as good as Sandboxie, but Sandboxie does require some user configuration, which I find to be more of a hassle than I need. That's just my own opinion, based on the fact that my security and browser choices have never led to a Fake Antivirus infection. And I do take risks on the Net, visiting some pretty shady streaming media sites from time to time.

    If your security regimen fails to protect you, I recommend also having a known-clean condition of your Operating System in a System Image Backup Archive. That way if anything you can't remove or don't want to be bothered removing shows up, you can wipe or completely reformat your hard drive, launch the Rescue Media you made from the Backup Software on a CD from outside of Windows, and Restore from a clean Archive to a previous, uninfected condition without reinstalling all your programs and settings. I've had to do this twice since my Windows XP laptop was bought in 2006.

    There are also antivirus programs which can be run from outside of Windows, including Microsoft's Windows Defender Offline. Sometimes these stand-alone applications can catch and disable or remove malicious software which can't be detected or removed with Windows running. Windows Secrets has had at least one column which explained offline antivirus programs.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2013-07-03 at 02:24.
    -- Bob Primak --

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bobprimak For This Useful Post:

    flavet (2013-07-03),lfh003 (2013-07-03)

  10. #9
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida, USA
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    52
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    @bobprimak - Thank you for that info. I am sure that readers of this tread will find it to their advantage if adopted.
    Dell Inspiron 15R, 8GB, Win7 Home Premium 64bit SP1
    All help truly appreciated!

  11. #10
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for your suggestions, Bob.
    This all began when my daughter somehow, someway clicked on the wrong link of some website. Her HP laptop got the fake PC Performer 2013 virus as a gift. After using such apps as MSE, AVG, and such, I found an iso of a specific product (free) that worked. I have forgotten the name of this little gem, but it worked. When I was in tech school, got several certificates, the use of a sandbox seemed only for Enterprise situations, now it can be used for home network applications, too. Besides the VMware I mentioned earlier, I would like to build a VPN server when I convert my old XP box to Win7Pro. I have an address (class A) from Bellsouth, which I am sure is shared...I know how that works. After a one-year course on Cisco Routers and Switches, I better know how that works. Thanks again for your reply.

  12. #11
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lfh003 View Post
    Thanks for your suggestions, Bob.
    This all began when my daughter somehow, someway clicked on the wrong link of some website. Her HP laptop got the fake PC Performer 2013 virus as a gift. After using such apps as MSE, AVG, and such, I found an iso of a specific product (free) that worked. I have forgotten the name of this little gem, but it worked. When I was in tech school, got several certificates, the use of a sandbox seemed only for Enterprise situations, now it can be used for home network applications, too. Besides the VMware I mentioned earlier, I would like to build a VPN server when I convert my old XP box to Win7Pro. I have an address (class A) from Bellsouth, which I am sure is shared...I know how that works. After a one-year course on Cisco Routers and Switches, I better know how that works. Thanks again for your reply.
    Sounds like you have options I hadn't considered. We all learn from each other around here. When/if you get that VPN set up, maybe post in The Lounge under Networking, and let us know how to do it?

    Virtualization is different from true sandboxing, but that is also a very good option for preventing something like a Fake Antivirus download from corrupting the host OS. Blowing away a VM sure is a lot less scary than rebuilding the primary OS!
    -- Bob Primak --

  13. #12
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, Ga
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I recently downloaded VMware Player. I may now have the opportunity to put something like Redhat or another Linux OS in that virtual environment and play around with it. I haven't used Unix in 20 years. My main surfing is techie stuff, history, and astronomy. Thanks for your reply.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •