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  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
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    Question about CPU core temp

    I recently purchased a new laptop (Sony VAIO SVS1513BGXB) with an Intel Core i7 3632QM (Ivy Bridge) processor. I installed a core temp monitoring app on the computer that monitors all four core temps. However, this info is not as useful to me as I would like, because I don't know what the core temp specifications are for this processor are (in particular, I'd like to know what is the specified max temp for the cores?).

    Can you provide (or point me to) this information?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    I would start to be concerned about any CPU temperature that is sustained @ 70C or above. The ‘SpeedFan’ suggested operating range for my wife’s i7 is 60-70C.

    SpeedFan (free app) may provide useful protective guidance for your unanswered question:
    http://www.filehippo.com/download_speedfan/

    Navigate your way thru the following: Readings > Configure > Temperatures

    Click on a Core or CPU item – the TYPICALLY EXPECTED ‘Desired’ and ‘Warning’ temperature ranges are revealed at the bottom.


    MONITORING: You can set an ‘Event’ that triggers a popup or beep (or both) when the temps get several degrees above warning. I normally require that such a temp reading be exceeded 5 times in succession and be reported every 5-10 seconds (my user selected options). Hopefully and often, such a warning may not last long once systems fans kick in or processor intensity declines.

    ISSUE PERSISTENCE: Upon investigation or reflection, it may be possible to notice incremental patterns that are often seemingly leading to overheating such as certain apps/web sites, too many running apps, screen saver, etc.

    BETTER RELIABILITY: Finally decided to get a laptop cooler because of VERY infrequent but random reboots.


    Also, have a look at the following discussion re: CPU Maximum Temperatures:
    http://www.pantherproducts.co.uk/ind...PUtemperatures

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Maximum core temp is 105 degrees C, but as Vopthis stated, I would be concerned at temps over 70 degrees C. CPU specs are at:
    http://ark.intel.com/products/71670#...tionessentials

    Jerry

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Find the specific make model of your CPU and then go over to Intel's website and search for the
    corresponding white paper, they always have them for all their CPUs.

    It'll look like this
    zzzzzzzzz.jpg
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  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger
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    Thanks for the info, guys.
    Just needed this as a reference; my laptop core temps actually run between 36 and 57 degrees C (that I've seen so far during my normal usage), so no issues there.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Yeah, 57 degrees for a laptop under load is not unusual.
    Placing toothpick boxes under it, and, or getting it off your lap is something I used to do.
    The toothpick boxes allowed air to circulate underneath it. Whatever you can come up with
    that is similar to the above is fine too.

    With how the processors are made nowadays, the worst you can expect with respect to high temperature is the CPU throttling down.
    Only in extreme cases (poor thermal contact with the heatsink), will your CPU shut down completely, or not even start (boot failure).
    These are protection features built into the chip. One would have to have some intent in order to deliberately destroy a CPU chip, like
    set the voltages to outrageous levels, and or fail to apply adequate thermal paste.

    If you find your running hotter than usual for the load, I'd start looking at performing the least invasive means (prop the laptop up
    so that air can circulate) to rectify the situation, then gradually look to the more invasive means (removing dust/reseating heatsink).
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-07-05 at 22:39.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

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