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  1. #1
    Lounger BigFatBoy's Avatar
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    Missing the MSR - GPT partition - How ? What now?

    I installed W8Px64 on a new, small (128GB) SSD. I used a genuine MS install disk and chose to have windows use the GUID Partition Table for the SSD. I also re-set the MB bios and updated the ASUS p8z77v bios file to embrace a UEFInterface. Everything seemed to go as hoped and I started adding applications and personal settings to the W8P installation.

    I thought I had successfully created a GPT drive but now I know something is missing; namely, partition #3, the MRS (Microsoft Reserved System) partition. The SSD contains the following: #1-a Recovery partition in NTFS, #2-a EFI System partition (fat32), and #4-the NTFS primary partition Drive 'C', where W8P is installed.

    Where am I regarding the missing #3 MRS partition??? Can I use a DISKPART command line to create the #3 MRS partition at this point? Do I need to start at the beginning and try again? Can I ignore the missing #3 MRS partition?
    My choice would be to resolve the issue cleanly and start using the W8P PC as intended.

    Thank you,
    disappointed, bfb
    Last edited by BigFatBoy; 2013-07-16 at 14:09.

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigFatBoy View Post
    I used a genuine MS install disk and chose to have windows use the GUID Partition Table for the SSD.
    Can you clarify that statement? Did you use Diskpart to clean and convert the drive to GPT before installing Windows?
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  4. #3
    Lounger BigFatBoy's Avatar
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    first reply to

    I did *not use Diskpart to convert the drive to GPT B-4 installing windows. I used a new SSD that was clean, raw, and never used, partitioned or formatted. FYI, *prior to the W8 install, I revised my ASUS Bios by (1) En-abling the CSM and (2) Dis-abling the "Secure Drive" function. I used a Microsoft "backup dvd" I purchased after downloading W8 software online, to install W8 on the SSD expecting a UEFI/GPT system as the outcome. It appears I got everything I wanted except for the missing MSR partition...
    I used this tip sheet as my guide:
    Nov. 30, 2012 | http://windowsitpro.com/windows-8/q-...i-built-myself

  5. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigFatBoy View Post
    I did *not use Diskpart to convert the drive to GPT B-4 installing windows.
    I believe "enabling CSM" puts you in legacy mode on an ASUS board. A drive (even RAW) usually must be converted to GPT. You may well be running BIOS/MBR rather than UEFI/GPT.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  6. #5
    Lounger BigFatBoy's Avatar
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    OP Reply #2

    Enabling the CSM on the ASUS p8z77v allows the user to boot from non-UEFI devices; in my case a DVD-Drive. Based on the tip sheet I used, GPT disks can\(do) not boot from NFTS formatted files but boot only from fat32 files. The tip sheet states the EFI System Partition is formatted as FAT32 for this reason. The GPT primary partition (C: drive) containing the W8x64 OS is NFTS, as is (*I believe) the Recovery Partition. My understanding is that it has something to do with the W8 boot loader. Everything on my PC indicates UEFI is active. The GUID of the Interface states UEFI; various start-up/repair/restore/advanced options in W8 indicate accessibility to the UEFI, and the Control Panel\Computer Management and \System Information tool indicates UEFI (in place of BIOS). See an attached .jpg of Disk Management section of Computer Management window for the (3) Partitions that were created during the W8 install.

    thank you
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    It does appear that your system is UEFI/GPT. I wouldn't worry about not having the Microsoft System Reserved (MSR) partition; your Recovery Partition probably fulfills that function. At only 300MB, I'm sure it doesn't contain a system image for a factory restore or anything of that nature.

    I don't have an MSR at all on my laptop, and it runs just fine. From what I understand, it only comes into play if one uses Bitlocker encryption, which I don't need or want.

    For confirmation, you can open an elevated command prompt, then Diskpart, and type "list disk" (without the quotes) and then list volume.

    Diskpart.PNG

    That will confirm that your disk is GPT.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

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  9. #7
    Lounger BigFatBoy's Avatar
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    thanks. I'll rest easy on the above. two more questions please. "At only 300MB, I'm sure it doesn't contain a system image for a factory restore or anything of that nature."
    that is correct and I need to create an image to restore by. it appears w8 gives the user several options to create a restore image. should I use W8 to create the image or something else. can any image of an existing install, partition, or disk be used as an install option of w8 on a brand new system drive?

    thank you.

    addendum
    I ran Diskpart: select disk 0\ list partitions = all 4 partitions were listed (including MSR). each listing with name and used\free space. I'll take it though I don't know why w8 disk management only listed 3?
    thank you for the assistance ..!!
    Last edited by BigFatBoy; 2013-07-17 at 14:20. Reason: .

  10. #8
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    There are a number of good drive imaging options, many of them free. I don't use the built-in Windows imaging, but some do. I use TeraByte's Image for Windows, others use Acronis, Macrium Reflect, etc.

    You do need to use software that is compatible with UEFI/GPT, but there are many options.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

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  12. #9
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    Windows 8 has a copy of the Windows 7 imaging tool but it is intended to be used only to access old Windows 7 backups. The current Windows 8.1 preview does not include this tool. Windows 8 provides Restore & Refresh. See How to restore, refresh, or reset your PC for more information. Also, there is lots of information all over the web about this functionality.

    If you really want an imaging tool you should use a third party tool such as one of those mentioned by Bbearen in post #8.

    Joe

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP517 View Post

    If you really want an imaging tool you should use a third party tool such as one of those mentioned by Bbearen in post #8.

    Joe
    Man, can I ever testify to the truth and value of that. I created both the little CD and (for me) a 16GB USB flash drive, and I have no idea what it is good for, but certainly not for imaging on to a new drive.

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