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  1. #1
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    Question Word 2010: Keeping or restoring correct formatting

    I'm trying to limit the number of styles that get added to documents once they return to us from clients. I know I can get my people to turn off Word's Keep track for formatting.

    The issue arises when clients send it back to us. We cna request they turn this feature off, but not all will comply.

    Is there another way to ensure that addition formatting/styles don't get added to our documents.

    Thanks,

    Chris

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  3. #2
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    Are you talking about real styles or just pseudo-styles (entries in the style list that show local formatting variations from the style)?

    You can remove all pseudo-styles from the document by selecting all and then resetting all the local formatting. This is done by Ctrl-A followed by Ctrl-Q and Ctrl-Space
    However, this may remove lots of formatting that you wanted.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

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    the_couchguards (2013-07-23)

  5. #3
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    Hi Andrew,

    Thank you for your help. I think most of these are the pseudo-styles you mentioned. I tried using the Ctrl-A followed by Ctrl-Q and Ctrl-Space. This seems to have gotten rid of alot of the formatting, like you said it would, and some of it was in tables - Arial 9 and bold that reverted to the documents Normal style.

    Can I ask what the intent of the Ctrl-Q and Ctrl-Space is? I always enjoy learning a new shortcut, but I'm not sure what these ar eintended to do.

    Is there a way to remove formatting styles in the list, especially the ones not being used?
    Last edited by the_couchguards; 2013-07-22 at 14:44.

  6. #4
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    Ctrl+Q is the default shortcut for the ResetPara command, which removes all direct paragraph formatting (indents, space before/after, line spacing, etc.) from the selection and leaves only what's defined in the underlying paragraph style.

    Ctrl+Space is the default shortcut for the ResetChar command, which removes all direct character formatting (bold, italic, underline, super/subscript, etc.) from the selection and leaves only what's defined in the underlying paragraph style. (Note that it will also remove any character style applied to the selection.)

    In the Styles pane (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S), click the Options link at the bottom and clear all three of the boxes under "Select formatting to show as styles".

  7. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to jjfreedman For This Useful Post:

    Charles Kenyon (2013-07-24),lpking (2013-07-25),the_couchguards (2013-07-23)

  8. #5
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    Thanks to both of you. That's huge help.

    Can I get you both to talk to my clients ;-)

  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_couchguards View Post
    Can I get you both to talk to my clients ;-)
    It shouldn't matter which way the clients have their options set. Clearing those check boxes on your computer will remove the pseudo-styles from the style list that you see, without changing what they see.

    You can clear out the direct formatting or leave it there -- presumably the client meant for some words to be bold or italic or whatever. The only time it's a problem is if they use direct formatting to make text (such as a heading) appear like it has a particular style without actually applying that style; then you would want to apply the real style to it. As a bonus, when you apply a style to a paragraph, you don't have to do the Ctrl+Q, Ctrl+Space first -- the style wipes out any direct formatting.

    As an example of when you want to apply a style over direct formatting, let's say Normal style is 11 pt Calibri regular, and Heading 1 style is 14 pt Cambria bold + blue. Mr. Client doesn't know or doesn't care about styles, so he writes his heading text in Normal style, then applies the font, size, and color to make it look like a Heading 1 paragraph that he sees somewhere else in the document. If all you wanted was to print the document on paper, that might be ok.

    But since that paragraph has the Body Text outline level from Normal style instead of Level 1, it won't appear in a Table of Contents, in Outline view, or in the Navigation pane. It doesn't have the Keep With Next option that all Heading styles have, so you might see the pseudo-heading at the bottom of a page while the next paragraph is on the next page. It won't have the Space Before setting of Heading 1, so the client might have inserted an empty paragraph mark above the heading. All these good things come for free when you use the correct style.

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    Charles Kenyon (2013-07-24)

  11. #7
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    Further to jjfreedman's useful explanation, you can see paragraph styles applied -- or not applied -- more readily by using File > Options > Advanced, Display and setting a value for "Style area pane width in Draft and Outline views" (I typically use 1"). With this turned on, the style name will be displayed to the left of each paragraph in the Draft and Outline views, so it is easy to scan through to find unwanted styles. If your practise is to avoid use of the Normal style (recommended), this view will let you easily spot any unwanted "Normal" paragraphs.

    You can also make use of a feature in the Style Pane Options dialog to find and fix most unwanted direct formatting. Use Ctrl-Alt-Shift-S, then click Options... to get at the dialog. Set Select styles to show=In Use and turn on the checkboxes in "Select formatting to show as styles".
    2013-07-25 09-38-27.jpg
    Now the style list will show all direct formatting variants in use in the document.
    2013-07-25 09-38-30.jpg

    When you right-click a listed variant, you'll have the option of selecting all instances of it -- and you can then just click on a style name to have it applied to all of them at once. So, using jjfreedman's example, the client's simulation of the Heading 1 style would show as "Cambria, 14pt, Bold, Blue". Right-clicking on the listing in the Styles list will show you how many instances there are (even if they are not visible in the current view), so you can select them all and then click on the Heading 1 listing to apply the correct style.

    While this method of changing the style pane options is very useful for reviewing styles, it will add a lot of clutter for documents where there is a lot of intentionally-applied direct formatting (note the separate listing for the bolded part of the Quote style in my screen shot above). I generally turn off at least the "Font formatting" checkbox, and show "All styles" to have access to styles not yet used.

    A more challenging problem is to find and fix instances of incorrect languages, because the language attribute is not included in variants in the style list. If a reviewer pastes content from a source with a different language set, spelling "mistakes" may be missed. For example, the Canadian "favour" pasted into a US English document will pass a spelling check because it is correct if it uses "Language=English (Canadian)" -- but if the user had pasted it from content inadvertently set to "Language=French (Canada)", it would be marked (correctly) as misspelled. This is a common problem in multilingual environments, where users often turn off the spelling indicator markers.

    To resolve this, I save the document, then use Find and Replace to change all instances of the preferred language to nothing. This removes all content using, say, "English (U.S.)" from the document and leaves me with just the content tagged with a different language. I can then use Shift-F1 to turn on the Reveal Formatting pane to review what is left to know what to look for to fix the problem instances. (Note that the sometimes-suggested fix of just selecting everything and setting a language will wipe out any intentionally-set language attributes.)

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    Charles Kenyon (2013-07-25),jjfreedman (2013-07-26),lpking (2013-07-25)

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