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  1. #1
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    Dell Optiplex 990 MT cooling

    With two hard drives, temp on the HDs is about 113F, there are no extra fan headers and the available used ones are 5 pin (love Dell). There is a grill at the front, any ideas how to up the cooling.

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    Go to frozencpu.com and look up bay coolers for a start. They have a variety of passive and active cooling options. You didn't indicate what orientation and/or spacing/space available around/between the drives to be too specific.

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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Your available options will depend on which case/model of 990 MT it is, Dell lists 4x case types for this: http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/optiplex-990/pd

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    Sorry, MT Minitower

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    You don't need to use a fan header on the board, just look for the appropriate power connector that is already on your PSU and get yourself a cable connector for it.

    The best thing to do, if you have the room, would be to position a fan in the front of the case.
    You could also use a hard drive cooler, but it will all depend on what kind of space you have available.



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    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure the MT (Minitower) is the largest of the four versions according to that pdf brochure; my guess is that there will be a space behind the front panel and ahead of the main chassis to fit a 120-140mm fan, which should blow cool air across the hard drives into the case, which could be connected via a standard Molex connector to the PSU wiring harness.

    This 120mm fan at Newegg, for example, has a high user satisfaction rating, is adjustable for speed (and noise), with Molex (PSU) connector and the alternative 3-pin motherboard chassis connector; you will need to physically check that this fits the case though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ibm650 View Post
    With two hard drives, temp on the HDs is about 113F, there are no extra fan headers and the available used ones are 5 pin (love Dell). There is a grill at the front, any ideas how to up the cooling.
    ibm,
    Hello... One of my PC's had the same problem ..the two HD's were mounted side by side in a vertical position (Front of PC) ..As a try i repositioned them (on the side of PC) and opened up the side panel this lowered the overall temp's ..Here's the problem and solution as i see it . In OEM cases there just is not enough room for serious "Fooling" around... Just get a larger "mid size" case ( with these you can use most motherboard form factors) and be done with it... and swap everything into it. Some cases have lots of options, for expansion and all sorts of "Toys" see the transformation of my "Rig" from the original HP case to the Corsair model with a new motherboard. In the new case there are 4 large fans ( with speed control) + one in the 750W PS, Cooling is no longer an issue, they run @ 80-85F ... Regards Fred

    PS: I now keep the original as a backup PC
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    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Dell is/are notoriously bad at enabling extra cooling to occur inside their cases.
    I like Clint's idea of positioning an external fan in front of the case - but the downside is that they are such noisy things...
    BATcher

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    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    The following won't help your hard drive temperature, but it will help your CPU temperature: apply some high-quality thermal grease to the CPU.

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2216879

    Remove the heat sync from the CPU, clean the surface of the CPU and heat sync really well, apply the new thermal grease to the surface of the CPU, then reinstall the heat sync.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    The following won't help your hard drive temperature, but it will help your CPU temperature: apply some high-quality thermal grease to the CPU.
    Remove the heat sink from the CPU, clean the surface of the CPU and heat sink really well, apply the new thermal grease to the surface of the CPU, then reinstall the heat sink.
    Surely you should add a couple of caveats:
    a) only do this if the temperature of your CPU is tending towards 'too hot' (run something like CoreTemp)
    b) be extremely careful, because failure to ensure good thermal contact can fry your CPU irrevocably
    BATcher

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  11. #11
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Surely you should add a couple of caveats:
    a) only do this if the temperature of your CPU is tending towards 'too hot' (run something like CoreTemp)
    b) be extremely careful, because failure to ensure good thermal contact can fry your CPU irrevocably
    Actually, the only caveat I would add would be (b) -- be extremely careful. I am of the opinion that often computers are put together with cheap-quality thermal grease. If you know what you are doing, AND IF YOU ARE EXTREMELY CAREFUL, it is good to "upgrade" to a better quality of thermal grease.

    This is especially true on a laptop, because if you're going to go to the trouble of opening the case and fooling with stuff, you might as well upgrade the thermal grease while you are in there.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I wouldn't mess with new thermal paste unless you have some indication of CPU overheating and then as a last resort after heatsink and fan cleaning. Its too easy to break something unless you really know what you are doing. Old thermal paste can really glue the heatsink and CPU together making it very difficult to separate the two. And you can also bend CPU pins in the process.

    Jerry

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    Another note on thermal grease. More is not better! It should be as little grease as you can use and still cover the entire surfaces. Mash and twist the heat sink down to force all air out of the mating surfaces. Measure the CPU temp before and after remating the parts.

  14. #14
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    I wouldn't mess with new thermal paste unless you have some indication of CPU overheating and then as a last resort after heatsink and fan cleaning. Its too easy to break something unless you really know what you are doing. Old thermal paste can really glue the heatsink and CPU together making it very difficult to separate the two. And you can also bend CPU pins in the process.

    Jerry
    You're right. It is easy to do serious damage, so you shouldn't mess with it unless you absolutely know what you're doing.

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