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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    From the book: F in Exams

    Subtitled "The Very Best Totally Wrong Test Answers"

    Chemistry
    1. What is a nitrate?
    Answer:


    2. Give a brief description of the meaning of the term "hard water."
    Answer:


    Biology
    1. What is a fibula?
    Answer:


    2. What does "terminal illness" mean?
    Answer:


    Mathematics
    1. To change centimeters to meters you...
    Answer:


    2. What is conditional probability?
    Answer:


    History
    Where was the Declaration of Independence signed?
    Answer:


    Brings tears to the eyes.

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  3. #2
    Bronze Lounger Maudibe's Avatar
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    Too funny!

  4. #3
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    <pedant-mode>
    In the UK we have/had an electricity payment rate called Economy 7, where the seven night-time hours were considerably cheaper than the remaining day hours. So that's when people set the washing machine and tumble drier to run.

    And it's centimetre and metre...
    A meter is something which measures the amount of something used, such as a gas meter, electricity meter or water meter.
    </pedant-mode>
    BATcher

    Dear Diary, today the Hundred Years War started ...

  5. #4
    4 Star Lounger access-mdb's Avatar
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    Most of those answers have a certain logic to them, even if wrong. Perhaps those who answered the questions should have got a mark for thinking outside the box (to coin a cliché).

    Way to go BATcher! You must be from Exeter (the only cultural area in the SW).

  6. #5
    5 Star Lounger
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    "Way to go BATcher! You must be from Exeter (the only cultural area in the SW)."

    Maybe it should be: Exetre

    The overall study of the changes in "English" is fascinating. For one, I find it curious that when someone is seriously ill, we say they are taken "to THE hospital" rather than "taken to hospital." When I head to the store, I get "in THE car" rather than "get in car." I'm not sure how the distinction is made to use or not use the "the".

  7. #6
    4 Star Lounger access-mdb's Avatar
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    Oh no, it can't be Exetre - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter for why (basically it was Escanceaster, castle on the Exe, and was shortened in speech, then writing). If you think this unlikely, Crediton, a town near Exeter is often pronounced as Kirton. Harwarden near Chester is pronounced Harden, Kirkcudbright in SW Scotland is pronounced Kercoobree (phonetic spelling). There are many other examples. To bring this thread back on topic, who can give a list of towns where the pronunciation isn't the same as the spelling?

    WRT the word 'the', it depends on context and who you're speaking to. I would most likely say 'in my car' to a stranger, 'in the car' to a family member or friend. It would be similar for the hospital quote - if it's the local hospital, then 'the' would be used. If it's some way away, it's likely that the hospital name would be used.

    'I'm going to the hospital' to my wife. 'I'm going to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital' if there might be some confusion.

    Do you people over the pond ever say 'the wife' or is it always 'my wife'. Change 'wife' to a suitable other relationship as needed. In this country, 'the wife' tends to be jocular and is often frowned upon (mainly by wives).

    Hope this helps!

  8. #7
    5 Star Lounger
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    I've heard people here (US) say "the wife" or "the girl friend". If I were married, I'd probably use her name, however.
    Personal choice.

    What do I say rather than "girl friend," always puzzles me since I'm not in high school and not married...I say "lady friend" but it often sounds odd. We don't live together so it's not "domestic partner." Also, not sure about "significant other."

    Hmmm.

  9. #8
    Bronze Lounger Maudibe's Avatar
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    How about, she is your steady, soul mate, companion, or angel muffin?

  10. #9
    4 Star Lounger access-mdb's Avatar
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    Lady friend is by the Byrds! Why not just say - my friend Mary - we sometimes get our selves in a bit of a twizzle about this. Saying lady friend or girl friend sometimes evinces a question from the older ones of 'are you courting then?'. That embarrassed me in the 60s, so does it happen now?

    Or you could say SWMBO (can be pronounced swimbo), though that's more for a wife.

  11. #10
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kweaver View Post
    The overall study of the changes in "English" is fascinating. For one, I find it curious that when someone is seriously ill, we say they are taken "to THE hospital" rather than "taken to hospital." When I head to the store, I get "in THE car" rather than "get in car." I'm not sure how the distinction is made to use or not use the "the".
    I don't think I've ever heard someone say "get in car" rather than "get in the car"!
    But "taken to hospital" usually happens after an accident; "taken to the hospital" is a direct equivalent.
    And that's just British usage - what those people overseas have done with our language does not bear thinking about!
    BATcher

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  12. #11
    Bronze Lounger Maudibe's Avatar
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    Hey.......! Even England has vicinities were the vernacular of the peasantry is quite atrocious.

  13. #12
    4 Star Lounger access-mdb's Avatar
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    whatwhatwhatwhatwhatwhatwhatwhat! As Ned Seagoon was wont to say. Oh, OK, maybe you're write.....

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