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  1. #1
    Bronze Lounger
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    Question Macrium Reflect question: type of image

    Can a Lounger familiar with Reflect confirm something for me, please. Just got around to doing another image (way overdue, I blush to admit). 2 questions:

    1. I selected "Create an image of the partition/s required to backup/restore Windows" instead of "Image all local drives on this computer". The backup took 42 minutes (my data is on the C drive, too, unfortunately) and the report did say it did a "full" image and all of C drive was backed up. Am I okay or should I redo the image, selecting the "all local drives" instead. If screenshots would help, I'll happily post what's needed.

    2. If I've done it correctly, do I need to restore from this image to test it? I did that with the first one I made, but absolutely dread the task as it adds hugely to stress levels!!!

    Thanks for any advice,

    Linda, the nervous Imager

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
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    As long as you are backing up your data separately on a more regular schedule than imaging usually affords, that is probably exactly what you want. You can verify the image, which means it's a good image, but to be absolutely sure one does need to restore from it.
    One way of doing that stress-free is to use a different hard drive just for such tests; restore to the test drive, and then swap drives and boot, or swap drives first and use boot media (USB or CD) to restore the image In situ, creating the same conditions as if there were a real failure you were recovering from.

  3. #3
    Bronze Lounger
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    Thanks for your prompt reply. Now I can close Reflect!

    I do backup daily to the cloud (using Mozy) and have managed to restore files successfully from there occasionally.

    I liked your stress-free option. Could the test hard drive be an external HD? If so, I could purchase a second one so the test drive is not the same as the image one.

    Linda

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Linda,

    Personally, I image the whole drive but only one drive at a time. Thus, for my main machine I do 2 images one for the Boot Drive (SSD) and one for the Data Drive (HDD).
    MacriumImages.JPG
    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  5. #5
    Bronze Lounger
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    Got it, thanks. Will do that for next image - which I've scheduled for September.

    It really is challenging to keep up with all these programs when you aren't using them regularly. Heck, I've been using MS Office for years and still feel comfortable only with Word and PowerPoint and, even then, am using only about 10% of their capabilities! AGH!

    Linda

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Drive imaging should just be confined to the operating system's (primary drive) and nothing else.
    It's very inefficient to image a purely data drive, not to mention that you will be adding an unnecessary degree of complexity
    over hard copy backups of this type of non operating system related data.

    Just keep a close eye on where your "checkmarks" are when you go to create an image.
    Also ensure the backup location is verified, even if it means double checking it.

    You already have a cloud based backup, which is good, but I would also want a portable external and
    maybe a few DVD's for the really important stuff. [Hard copied data, not images]
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by IreneLinda View Post
    Could the test hard drive be an external HD? If so, I could purchase a second one so the test drive is not the same as the image one.

    Linda
    It can be an external drive that you restore the image to; however at some point, either before or after restoring, that drive as to take the place of the drive the image was made from in order to test it fully. I use a 2.5 inch bare laptop drive (500gigs) so I can swap it for a laptop drive or just open the case of a desktop and pull the data and power cable off the system drive and temporarily connect the little test drive.

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Personally, I keep all my data on a second partition from the OS and apps. In this way if I have to restore the Image, my data is not touched. If your Image is, say, 1 month old, the data in the Images is also 1 month old. You would then have to restore the data from a different back up. In my case I do not have to worry about that because my data is on a different partition.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  9. #9
    5 Star Lounger
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    FWIW, I use Macrium, I keep my data off of my OS partition, and I take frequent images of my OS partition AND my data partition. I don't find it inefficient nor complex. I've used Macrium to set up one backup for each. When it's time to run my images, I just select the named image "program" and execute it. It takes me 8 minutes to do the OS, and 2 and a 1/2 minutes to do my data. Easy peasey.

    Dick

  10. #10
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    Clint et al,

    Oh, wow. I think one of the issues is that I have never learned how to "partition" a drive. Guess that's why my image takes so long to do! And I don't really need the data images since it is backed up in the cloud (and key items, on DVD when I remember to do so!).

    Somehow need to figure out how to image just the OS and do that each month. In addition, I think it would be a good idea to back up data on the external HD as well as in the cloud.

    Of course, part of all this is that I don't get into this whole back up issue often enough that it is a habit yet so each incident involves a new learning curve. Not terribly efficient, I know!

    Thanks for the input,

    Linda

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Partitioning is easy. Use a partitioning app such as Partition Wizard then follow the instructions shown: (just be careful getting the free edition from Download.com. They often piggyback unwanted apps. You have to opt out of these)

    Partition Wizard.jpg

    Highlight the partition you wish to create a new partition from and slide the slider, choose OK, then apply. Some changes have to be made outside of Windows, but the app takes care of all that.

    Once you have created the unallocated space, open the app again, select (highlight0 the unallocated space , right click and select Format, then set as Logical. Now you are ready to use this newly created partition for something else.

    The proper way to move data to a new partition is shown by PC World. You can even move your mail client store (where your email is saved) if you know where it is saved now.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  12. #12
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    If you are doing a monthly full image 42 minutes does not seem excessive. Is it really that big a deal? All partitioning a single drive gets you is the ability to restore the OS separately from the data. IMO, partitioning a single drive gives many people a false sense of security. If the drive goes belly up all the partitions are shot anyway.

    How often have you garbaged up the OS to the point of a restore? I'm constantly installing, uninstalling, upgrading, and otherwise modifying software at work and at home. Now, I realize I may be the exception and extremely stubborn when it comes to trying to figure out an issue but nevertheless I can only remember restoring an image once in the last decade.

    You can start a backup, walk away for an hour, spend the hour doing something enjoyable, and let it run.

    Joe

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I have restored Images numerous times. Sometimes it's just a shortcut to an objective that could have been accomplished another way without the restoration, but since I'm impatient this works for me.

    If a person is never "experimenting" with there OS, then perhaps there is little expectation of the need for Image restoration, but for many of us this just makes our lives easier. The other problem we see quite regularly is the virus or malware that fudges things up to such an extent that Image restoration might save days of work, then crossing your fingers that it actually works.

    Joe is such an experienced and expert user that he will undoubtedly have far fewer problems than us average people at getting back to where he was without Image restoration.

    I suspect Image restoration as a result of a disk failure is one of the lesser used reasons for Imaging and restoring from those Images.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by IreneLinda View Post
    Clint et al,

    Oh, wow. I think one of the issues is that I have never learned how to "partition" a drive. Guess that's why my image takes so long to do! And I don't really need the data images since it is backed up in the cloud (and key items, on DVD when I remember to do so!).

    Somehow need to figure out how to image just the OS and do that each month. In addition, I think it would be a good idea to back up data on the external HD as well as in the cloud.

    Of course, part of all this is that I don't get into this whole back up issue often enough that it is a habit yet so each incident involves a new learning curve. Not terribly efficient, I know!

    Thanks for the input,

    Linda
    I agree with Joe. My desktop disk usage is about 300 GB. Imaging it takes between 1 hour and a bit or 2 1/2 hours, depending on whether I image to my e-sata drive or my regular USB 2.0 drive. When I image it, I usually do it during dinner time or during the night - I leave it on and start the image just before I go to bed.

    Using multiple partitions, although with some advantages regarding imaging, has also some drawbacks - you can't upgrade Windows without using a clean install, for example. Although configuring a system to use multiple partitions is not overly complex, it can be a bit of work, as well.

    My advice would be to leave things as they are, if they work for you. No need to introduce additional complexity if your current setup works.
    Rui
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  15. #15
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Using multiple partitions, although with some advantages regarding imaging, has also some drawbacks - you can't upgrade Windows without using a clean install, for example. Although configuring a system to use multiple partitions is not overly complex, it can be a bit of work, as well.
    Rui,

    I upgraded from Win 8 to Win 8 Pro on my new computer w/o a problem and I had both the Documents and Swap folders on separate partitions on a different drive. If memory serves, not always the case, When I originally installed Win 8 on my previous desktop it was upgraded from Win 7 HP (same partition setup) w/o a problem. YMMV
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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