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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    Expanding or replacing a solid-state drive




    LANGALIST PLUS


    Expanding or replacing a solid-state drive



    By Fred Langa

    Running out of room on your SSD? No problem! Standard disk-compression and disk-imaging tools work just as well on today's flash-memory drives as they do on classic disk-based drives. Plus: Working around Internet download limits, reusing old hard drives in new PCs, and a free database that tells you which software is safe to remove.


    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/expanding-or-replacing-a-solid-state-drive/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    Star Lounger
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    I remember a lot of old advice about staying away from disk compression on your boot drive. Does this still hold true on modern PCs with lots of RAM, an SSD, and a decent CPU?

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    A Couple of Things to Try First

    I second Star Lounger's question. I was surprised it wasn't addressed in the article. I have no experience with SSDs. Are they really so fast that you can ZIP the operating system and still get decent performance?

    Anyway, here are three things to try first.

    1. Some folders under c:\windows are crap and grow gigabytes monthly and can be safely deleted. Search online to find these out. I dropped these about five years ago (from XP of course) -- it had a big impact then, but the folders would be different now. Why do I assume this still holds? Because Microsoft assumes that you have installed Windows on a terabyte disk and so back up all types of garbage, then back up its backups. (Are the modern Windows OS's different now? Does the leopard change its spots?) Find these out and get rid of them.

    2. Find a program that tells you how much space each folder takes up. (I use GP Software's Directory Opus, which is so awesome that I've paid for it -- but they'll give you a 60 day license for free.) Now find the programs that use up the most space. Uninstall them, and reinstall them on a terabyte hard drive.

    3. Run CCleaner. 'Nuff said.

    I ran Windows XP in a 20 gig space for ten years using these three methods -- no problems until my motherboard failed last month. I suspect you'll be able to recover a few dozen gigs. At least.

    Honestly, no operating system and collection of core programs should take up the better part of an eighth of a terabyte. That's just stupid. There's a lot of garbage there -- language files, backups, data, abandoned installers, who knows. Clean, then compress if you have to. I bet you don't have to.

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    I'm "re-using" some old, small, IDE drives for storage images/data on a Sata-only machine. A specialist computer store carried (quite some time ago) a little board with a IDE plug on it which plugs onto the back of the drive and the outgoing Sata cable plugs into a Sata port on the MB. Cheaper than an enclosure and occupies no real-estate.

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Fred Langa speaks of converting from IDE to USB. I'd much prefer going from IDE to SATA, like you have done. I believe it would be a more reliable way, because USB is not a completely mature technology, and bugs do exist here and there with USB. Also, I've never heard of an issue with IDE to SATA, but I have actually had issues with external USB hard drives, which convert from SATA to USB.

  6. #6
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    Will compressing the Win 7 OS on an SSD affect the system response time? I can't believe there will be no noticeable impact, does anyone have experience of doing this?

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