Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20
  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger Backspacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Scappoose
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts

    copying windows disk

    Hi,
    I am building a new computer. I intend to install an SSD as my C drive. My current installation of Windows 7 Pro is working fine and I would like to clone it on to the new SSD and use it in the new system. I would essentially be putting my current installation into completely new hardware. Nothing at all carried over. So my first question is: will that work?

    I would also like to keep my old system in use. That would mean that I would have two copies of Windows 7 Pro and I only bought one. I suspect that is not allowed. Am I right?

    So I also have a Windows 7 Pro upgrade disk that I've never used. Is there a way to register either the old or the new copy of windows using the product key from the unused upgrade disk? I would emphasize that I'm not pulling a fast one here. I paid around $200 bucks for that disk in real money, but the computer I was going to install it on died before I could use it.

    Or can I actually apply the upgrade disk to the old computer and re-register it with the new key? I need to delete and remove a whole lot of software from it and it might be just as well to just overwrite it, do all the windows updates and then just install the few applications that I need on it.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    To insure success on what is new hardware for a working image of an established Windows OS I use EaseUS ToDo Workstation which can restore an image to a system with dissimilar hardware. Previous to that, sometimes it would work, sometimes not when just transferring the hard drive; if the hardware is similar it has more chance of working.

    You would have to activate Windows in the new system and then, yes, not allowed to use the old system with the same product key. If you right click on Computer and choose properties, you should find a Change Windows 7 product key section where you can get the unused one entered and activated. Sounds like you would be better off with a fresh install though if you need to make extensive changes. The upgrade key will work just fine for a clean install, check out Paul Thurrott's winsupersite concerning clean installs with Win 7 upgrade disc for more info on that.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger Backspacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Scappoose
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Thank you for telling me where to enter my product key. I would never have found that on my own.

    How do I restore the image to my new computer if there is no OS on it?

    It would seem safer to do a new install on the new hardware, but I have a lot of software on the old one and re-creating my entire environment on the new system would be an immense amount of work. Unless someone says that it absolutely won't work I think I will at least try making a copy onto the new drive and installing it in the new system and at least see if it will work.

    But to do a new install on the old system does sound tempting. Once I'm sure of the new system I will be moving the old one into my store for my remote use. There would be so much re-configuration to make it safe from prying eyes that it might really be easier to just wipe it and start fresh.

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspacer View Post
    How do I restore the image to my new computer if there is no OS on it?
    I use a bootable drive that contains the EaseUS Workstation PE recovery program on a small Fat32 formatted partition. I could just as easily use a optical boot disc with the same recovery program on it. The advantage I have in this case over the free versions is the inclusion of the dissimilar hardware restore feature.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

  5. #5
    3 Star Lounger Backspacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Scappoose
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    What actually takes place in the dissimilar restore feature? Does it just refer to the drive itself or does it somehow adapt the whole OS to its new hardware environment? A couple of weeks ago I used an Intel supplied cloning program to upgrade a C drive to SSD. When I put the cloned SSD into the same old system windows adapted without any problems. But I suspect windows will have to do a whole lot more adapting if I put the cloned drive into a whole new system.

  6. #6
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,407
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 405 Times in 377 Posts
    "Dissimilar hardware" refers only to the source and target drives or partitions being different sizes. In other words, you can, for example, make an image of a 500 GB drive and successfully restore it to a 2 TB drive.

    All of the other dissimilarities, such as a different motherboard, different video card, or different ethernet device, will have to be dealt with separately after you have restored the image to the new drive.

  7. #7
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    Basically it involves identifying boot parameters/drivers and replacing them if need be with generic ones that will allow the system to boot on the new hardware so the rest of the hardware drivers can be installed. That's why it will work sometimes just by transferring the drive physically. It won't run worth a hoot without all the proper drivers but if it boots, a ton of drivers will be installed by the OS (give it plenty of time initially) and you can mop up with the non-Microsoft drivers.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

  8. #8
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    "Dissimilar hardware" refers only to the source and target drives or partitions being different sizes. In other words, you can, for example, make an image of a 500 GB drive and successfully restore it to a 2 TB drive.

    All of the other dissimilarities, such as a different motherboard, different video card, or different ethernet device, will have to be dealt with separately after you have restored the image to the new drive.
    mrjimphelps,
    Hello... That is not quite correct....Programs such as Macrium Reflect Pro, and Acronis True Image Home ...Have the ability to restore an "Image" That was made on one PC and install it to a new and totally different PC (completely different hardware ) EX: Macrium Reflect Pro has a function called "Re-Deploy". With this, before boot time ( using a Macrium recovery disk ) you load your selected "HAL" layer, and all of the new drivers , controllers, etc... Then Macrium then installs the whole "Shootin Match" ....then boots (loads this) to the new PC ...Simple "Hard Drive" swaps don't need a "Re-Deploy" function...As previously stated not "talkin" the "legality" (Activation) question ...only the ability Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  9. #9
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,407
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 405 Times in 377 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain Fred View Post
    mrjimphelps,
    Hello... That is not quite correct....Programs such as Macrium Reflect Pro, and Acronis True Image Home ...Have the ability to restore an "Image" That was made on one PC and install it to a new and totally different PC (completely different hardware ) EX: Macrium Reflect Pro has a function called "Re-Deploy". With this, before boot time ( using a Macrium recovery disk ) you load your selected "HAL" layer, and all of the new drivers , controllers, etc... Then Macrium then installs the whole "Shootin Match" ....then boots (loads this) to the new PC ...Simple "Hard Drive" swaps don't need a "Re-Deploy" function...As previously stated not "talkin" the "legality" (Activation) question ...only the ability Regards Fred
    So, are you saying that the drivers for the target hardware would all be in place on the target hardware? Wouldn't you have had to prepare for that (i.e. have the new drivers loaded and ready to go) before doing the image? Otherwise, how will it know what drivers are correct for the new hardware?

    What I am calling "prep" is probably what you're calling "loading up the HAL layer with the new drivers."

    If this is true, then restoring to dissimilar hardware has come a long way since I have done it.

  10. #10
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,407
    Thanks
    447
    Thanked 405 Times in 377 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    Basically it involves identifying boot parameters/drivers and replacing them if need be with generic ones that will allow the system to boot on the new hardware so the rest of the hardware drivers can be installed. That's why it will work sometimes just by transferring the drive physically. It won't run worth a hoot without all the proper drivers but if it boots, a ton of drivers will be installed by the OS (give it plenty of time initially) and you can mop up with the non-Microsoft drivers.
    I feel like Rip Van Winkle -- it's been a very long time since I have done this sort of thing, and apparently a lot has changed.

  11. #11
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    From what I understand Macrium ReDeploy is a little more tailor-made for the target system whereas ToDo WS is run and gun, or boot'n shoot...something in the driver pack will work to bootstrap; no prep needed. Hasn't failed me yet in about 20 "redeploys" now but I could see where if I had brand new hardware, my recovery disc might not contain a compatible driver until it was updated. I'm not messing with Win8 at all so my chances for success remain high.

  12. #12
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    So, are you saying that the drivers for the target hardware would all be in place on the target hardware? Wouldn't you have had to prepare for that (i.e. have the new drivers loaded and ready to go) before doing the image? Otherwise, how will it know what drivers are correct for the new hardware?
    mrjim,

    Hello...

    1. The "drivers" \ "Image" are placed on a Flash drive or CD\DVD RW, or USB HD, etc. Not on the target HD. ex: a "CD" that would come with a new Motherboard.

    2. You "Point" Macrium \ Acronis to the files (location) as part of the "Re-Deploy" function, so it loads them before you try to boot the "Image"

    3. The "HAL Layer" ( hardware abstraction layer ) is another choice to be made... What type of CPU "multi processor" etc. Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  13. #13
    3 Star Lounger Backspacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Scappoose
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    I feel like Rip Van Winkle -- it's been a very long time since I have done this sort of thing, and apparently a lot has changed.
    You think you feel like Rip Van Winkle? I used to design large corporate computer systems filling multiple racks, with redundancy and near fault tolerance. I once built a compute engine that went up in the Shuttle (cargo bay experiment, not ship's systems). Windows was a joke that we snickered at back then. And after being away from it for 20 years almost nothing is the same. It's something for you kids out there to keep in mind: brace yourselves because whatever you think the world is right now, almost everything you know will become obsolete. And I'm not just talking about technology. The landscape I grew up in is indelibly changed. The way people talk and behave towards one-another has changed. Everything. And I'm only 57 years old...

  14. #14
    3 Star Lounger Backspacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Scappoose
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    I think I'm getting there. May I break this down into some more questions?
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain Fred View Post
    1. The "drivers" \ "Image" are placed on a Flash drive or CD\DVD RW, or USB HD, etc. Not on the target HD. ex: a "CD" that would come with a new Motherboard.
    So I get a CD with the new motherboard with the drivers on it. This is easy to grasp. :-)

    2. You "Point" Macrium \ Acronis to the files (location) as part of the "Re-Deploy" function, so it loads them before you try to boot the "Image"
    Now I'm already confused. At this point is Macrium (what I'll use, since I already own it) on the old computer, the driver CD plugged into the old computer, and the new SSD which is destined for the new one is plugged into the old computer?

    3. The "HAL Layer" ( hardware abstraction layer ) is another choice to be made... What type of CPU "multi processor" etc.
    And then I specify this HAL layer to Macrium with everything on the old computer as stated in #2?
    And then Macrium "re-deploys" the old setup with the new drivers onto the new SSD?
    And then I move the new SSD to the new computer and boot it up?

    If that is really how it works, then it sure sounds easier than I expected.

  15. #15
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,335
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 267 Times in 260 Posts
    ...from point # 2...you make an image of the current (old) system and you are done with that system. Everything else occurs on the new system, SSD is already installed and connected. Macrium (boot disc or USB key) taps the image and whatever drivers (for the new system) made available/needed to ReDeploy the image to the SSD in working order.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •