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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Modify file on Windows Server 2008 R2

    Hello Guys!

    I want to apologize for my not fluent english, i hope to be comprehensible and to quickly fill possible gaps.

    I've got a server with Windows server 2008 r2, a domain controller, and many pc, both notebook and desktop,logged in as domain users, all with OS Windows 7 64-bit.
    The are many folders on the server but the problem is with one folder only; There are many users but only 10 can read & write on the folder \\x.y.z.k\CAD .
    On this folder i want to apply a rule like this:
    A) If i read only a file in the folder--> ok no problem... do this as always
    B) If i want to modify a file (change something)--> i MUST copy that file in local folder (Desktop for example) then i can work it (then save on server)
    C) If i want to delete /change name/zip/unzip etc files from server--> ok i no problem... do this as always

    I look at this:http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com...-e687741d275e/ could it be helpful?

    Alternatively I thought about this kind of resolution if praticable:
    Instead of avoid changing the file from server, I thought to making it possible only for a short time .
    I try to explain it: I open a file (as before possibly for large files> X MB) if i'm opening it for server i've got a limited time (2 'for example) to do anything (read edit or save), alternatively, opening by local folders, there are no time llimit. Plausible?

    Thanks a lot guys, forgive me i'm newbie and i don't speak english very well

    A
    Last edited by Albiz; 2013-09-20 at 08:48.

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  3. #2
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Albiz, welcome to the Lounge!

    Sorry, I don't have an answer to your question, but I wanted to let you know that your English is excellent!

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    Albiz (2013-09-20)

  5. #3
    New Lounger
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    Hi mrjimphelps!
    Thank you anyway!
    What about my english.. i think it's rusty but thaks
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    but I wanted to let you know that your English is excellent!
    A

  6. #4
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    Thankfully you don't have to read my Spanish!

  7. #5
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    I do not think Windows has the controls you need.

    You might be able to use something like SharePoint for this control.

    You might be able to use one of the software developers' source code control tools. Users can "check out" files freely and do whatever they want. But strict controls are placed on "check in". I don't have any specific recommendations but Google "source code control" or "document control" for many choices.

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    Albiz (2013-09-25)

  9. #6
    Gold Lounger
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    A) Yes.
    B) Yes, this is the same as A), but you cannot save the file to the same name / location as the original. You can set up the folder permission to allow you to write the file using a new name in the original location.
    C) No. This requires write / change access and A) prevents this. You can write a copy with a new name - see answer to B).

    cheers, Paul

  10. #7
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    Angry

    Hi guys!
    it's a lot of time since i wrote you.
    Thank for replies but sincerely the only thing i realized is that i've done nothing to improve my situation.
    Have you some updates, something new that can help me?
    @Paul T: The A, B. C points what means? can you explain it better please?

    Thanks
    A

  11. #8
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    Sorry, didn't read the question thoroughly.

    You cannot set timed write access unless you run a program on the server that changes permissions after you request access. This is guaranteed to fail at some point.

    You could write new files to a new directory and then have a program running on the server that copies the new files over the old files. This server program would require different credentials to have write access. The downside is people will write files to the new directory and they will disappear. This will confuse users and lead to lots of calls to the help desk.

    cheers, Paul

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    Albiz (2013-10-10)

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Sorry, didn't read the question thoroughly.

    You cannot set timed write access unless you run a program on the server that changes permissions after you request access. This is guaranteed to fail at some point.

    You could write new files to a new directory and then have a program running on the server that copies the new files over the old files. This server program would require different credentials to have write access. The downside is people will write files to the new directory and they will disappear. This will confuse users and lead to lots of calls to the help desk.

    cheers, Paul
    Hi Paul!
    Thanks for your reply and the continued presence in this forum!
    Now i understand that the timed write access is not the solution; you have explained it very well.
    What about the dimension write access? is it the same thing?
    Some friend of mine told me that this idea is self-defeating because i have GB connection, vlan, switch etc.. the "non plus ultra" and i must use it.
    Do you think the same?
    Thanks
    A

  14. #10
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    File permissions are written to the MFT on the disk. There is no way to change these except by writing to the disk.
    Any network / speed / location information is not relevant to those permissions.

    cheers, Paul

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    Albiz (2013-10-10)

  16. #11
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    Alternative

    Hi guys!
    I'm crashing my head on the wall trying to find a solution and what happend?
    I found this: http://git-scm.com/
    Maybe it's nothing or maybe it's the solution i don't know.. Tomorrow i'll think about it...
    Hoping...
    What do you think about it?
    thanks
    A

  17. #12
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    A version control system may be just what you need, but it does have server overhead and probably isn't transparent, meaning you won't see the real files where you save the modified ones. Let us know how it goes.

    cheers, Paul

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    Albiz (2013-10-10)

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