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  1. #1
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    restoring backup

    I have several related questions regarding restoring a full backup of C: drive.
    My old computer was an eMachines running Win7 Home Premium, with two 1TB hard drives. The Seagate drive contained the C: partition and I now think that drive has gone bad.

    When I first started having problems I thought some malware must be the cause, but after scanning with four separate scanners, all reporting nothing, I began suspecting the drive was going bad. I removed the Seagate and installed it in a docking station attached to a new HP computer. The HP would not recognize the drive so I put it back into the eMachine and began trying to recover files with various versions of Linux. I know almost nothing about Linux and all their command line garbage so I'm not sure whether it was my fault or the bad drive's fault but I could not get any version of Linux to show me anything useful.

    Now to begin the questions: I also had a Toshiba 1TB drive in the eMachine and I have taken it out and put it in the docking station attached to my HP. On it there is a full backup of C: on the Seagate drive which was made on 7-13-13 with Macrium Reflect. There is only one partition on the Toshiba, so I'm wondering if I can repartition that drive and name one C: then get Macrium Reflect to restore the backup to that drive (while in the docking station) then put that drive back in the eMachine and throw the Seagate in the trash. Also, should I copy the backup to my HP hard drive before trying to repartition? Or is there no danger of the repartitioning process destroying the backup?

    Should that give me a functional eMachine again? If that won't work, is there any other way to recover my files from the backup?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I don't use Macrium Reflect, but several here do. Hopefully someone will chime in here and give you some useful advice. I would go about it in a different way, but then I use a different imaging software.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I don't us Macrium either, but this page shows how to browse an image backup to see what's in it and extract individual files. You must have Macrium installed on the computer you use to explore the image:
    http://kb.macrium.com/KnowledgebaseArticle50061.aspx

    Jerry

  4. #4
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    It doesn't sound like you have a backup of the data that was on the drive and you are not specific on what type of backup is on the Toshiba so I'll assume it was a single image. If the assumptions are correct, first thing I would do is mount the image while it's in the dock on the other system and recover (copy off) critical data. Also copy off any other normal data you want or need from that drive if necessary.

    Once that is done you also need to unmount the image and copy the entire backup image from the Toshiba if you are going to try and use that drive again as a system drive in the eMachine.

    When finished with all the data retrieval from the Toshiba drive, then you can restore the image to said same drive with Macrium Reflect (M-R). You probably don't have to repartition since the image will most likely recreate the same partitioning layout from the time it was made, especially if the image was of the entire drive or you will have the option to resize the partitions in M-R before letting it restore the image.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by meamjw View Post
    I have several related questions regarding restoring a full backup of C: drive.
    My old computer was an eMachines running Win7 Home Premium, with two 1TB hard drives. The Seagate drive contained the C: partition and I now think that drive has gone bad.
    meamjw,

    Hello.... If this were my PC i would do the following ..I would be cautious so this will involve more steps

    1. Your going to need a "Macrium Reflect" recovery disk ...for whatever version you have. Macrium allows you to move the "install key" from one PC to another... so you could use the Key to install Macrium on the HP if you didn't make a recovery disk.

    2. Move the Image (copy) to a flash drive and to the HP ...just to be safe.

    3. Once you do this you can partition the working drive however you want , Then using the "Macrium Recovery" disk you restore the Image to it.

    If you have any questions ...post back and we will try to guide you if your not sure with \about any of this.... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  6. #6
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    Meamjw:
    I use Macrium and I will pitch in with Fred as necessary; and I also recommend you follow Fred's advice above.
    Best,
    Dick

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