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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    Windows 8.1 disc release may cause confusion

    The following link may be of interest:

    http://www.infopackets.com/news/busi..._confusion.htm

    It seems Microsoft is planning to release boxed copies of Windows 8.1, thereby saving new buyers from having to download the first big update to the Windows 8 operating system (OS). However, the boxed version's pricing and installation process may make it both confusing and unattractive for many consumers. See the link for more.
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Motherboard (Military Class III); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  2. #2
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    I don't see what's so confusing about that. If anything, it seems less confusing than last time round when there was no Windows 8.0 full retail version.

    The cheaper route via a Windows 8.0 upgrade now and a free Windows 8.1 upgrade later won't remain available for long, as Windows 8.0 upgrades will disappear.

    In my view, the article is wrong when it says, "If you're currently using a previous version of Windows, such as Windows 7, the boxed version of Windows 8.1 isn't for you. The discs are for people installing Windows for the first time, not people looking to upgrade from a previous version of the OS."

    Microsoft says, "However we also recognize there will be some folks who may want to upgrade devices running older versions of Windows to Windows 8.1. The information in this blog post is meant for those people. Consumers who are not using a Windows 8 device will be able to buy Windows 8.1, either as a download from Windows.com or at your local store as a retail packaged DVD product." and continues with how to use a retail DVD to upgrade from Windows 7, Vista or XP.

    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2013-09-24 at 11:18.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceR View Post
    In my view, the article is wrong when it says, "If you're currently using a previous version of Windows, such as Windows 7, the boxed version of Windows 8.1 isn't for you. The discs are for people installing Windows for the first time, not people looking to upgrade from a previous version of the OS."



    Bruce
    That applies in the context of in-place upgrades; there aren't any from Win7 on back; it's clean install or nothing. Though we generally recommend clean installs anyway, a lot of folks won't be keen on no option but to reinstall everything and logic dictates that it wouldn't be a wise economic move to buy a boxed version if already running Win8. If I hadn't gotten the "scoop" from Windows Weekly I would have been mistaken in my assumption; 8.1 does no connotate the in-place upgrade path removal.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    That applies in the context of in-place upgrades; there aren't any from Win7 on back; it's clean install or nothing. Though we generally recommend clean installs anyway, a lot of folks won't be keen on no option but to reinstall everything and logic dictates that it wouldn't be a wise economic move to buy a boxed version if already running Win8. If I hadn't gotten the "scoop" from Windows Weekly I would have been mistaken in my assumption; 8.1 does no connotate the in-place upgrade path removal.

    You can upgrade from Windows 7 and keep files, using either download or retail disc for the same price.

    But upgrading from XP or Vista requires the retail DVD, which is contrary to what is said in that article.

    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2013-09-24 at 13:35.

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    Ah, I see, the article doesn't make the distinction between the download and DVD version of 8.1. Seems to add even more confusion when one can be used with 7 but not with the earlier versions.
    The main thrust of the article though I think is the difference in in-place upgrade paths between 7 to 8 to 8.1 and 7 to 8.1. Completely different scenarios for the time when both will be an option. A partial data migration is not an in-place upgrade.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Congrat's!

    Y'all got me thoroughly confused!

    I'll just keep my XP.

    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

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    I am wondering if you will be able to download an installation image for 8.1. When Win 8 came out this was an option - what you really paid for was the license key.

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    Unless you get Windows 8.1 ISO from MSDN, TechNet, or Volume Licensing, it will be offered as an update through the Windows Store. I think the mechanism will be you'll be offered a small update from Windows Update which will enable the availability in the store. My take is that if you get it through the store is will not be an ISO.

    Joe

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    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    @JoeP517: The ISO download available on the TechNet size is a massive 3.8GB. If this will be the size of the Windows Store Update, it will perhaps not be too attractive to those who have limits applied to the total size of their monthly internet downloads. I used the TechNet ISO to "in-place" update my system (using my existing Win 8 Product Key) and it was a lengthy (30 minute) process with 4 re-boots that ultimately required a number of re-installations of drivers/software before I was fully up and running again.

    Some details are at my post: http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...st-Impressions
    Last edited by petesmst; 2013-09-27 at 09:05. Reason: added link
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    @petesmst,

    The ISO download size is not necessarily reflective of the download size from the Microsoft Store. IMO, this will be more like installing a service pack from Windows Update - the system will be examined and only the required files will be downloaded.

    Thirty minutes to upgrade Windows is not really very long.

    Joe

  11. #11
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
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    @JoeP517: With my system and with my OS installed on an SSD, I considered 30 minutes to be long(!!) Sorry! (Although, with 183GB on the disk, and doing an in-place upgrade, perhaps 30 minutes was very fast!!)
    Last edited by petesmst; 2013-09-27 at 10:05. Reason: corrected a typo
    (My Setup: Custom built: 4.00GHz Intel Core i7-6700K CPU; MSI Z170A Gaming Carbon Motherboard (Military Class III); Win 10 Pro (64 bit)-(UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; 2 X GeForceGTX 1070 8GB Graphics Card (SLI); Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2017 Premium, Norton Internet Security, VMWare Workstation12 Pro). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  12. #12
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    @petesmst,

    My observation of a couple of machines being upgraded to Windows 8.1 was that there were significant amounts of time where the HD was not very active. This is just a casual observation. I don't remember the wall clock time but I think it was approximately an hour. One PC is a core i5-3550 and the other an older core 2 duo (don't remember the model). Both have 7200 RPM drives. So, I would think that running an I7 with an SSD would be significantly faster and that 30 minutes would be OK.

    Joe

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