Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 132 Times in 86 Posts

    How to bypass the Windows sign-in password




    LANGALIST PLUS


    How to bypass the Windows sign-in password



    By Fred Langa

    If you're willing to accept the risk, you can easily disable the sign-in step for any version of Windows including Windows 8. Plus: Disk compression's effects on performance, solving copy problems in Win8, and identifying the source of email delays.


    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/how-to-bypass-the-windows-sign-in-password/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    10
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Regarding your article "Does disk compression kill performance?": I used disk compression up to now only in separate files, such as photos and documents. I took the plunge on a rather full disk and did the whole thing. It took hours, but the results were spectacular. I decreased the used space from 399 GB to 81.2 GB and the free space was increased from 186 GB to 504 GB. That is a change of almost FIVE times. And, as you said, I cannot see any degradation of processing time. Thanks a million for your suggestions and for this and your previous article on this subject.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    4,756
    Thanks
    171
    Thanked 653 Times in 576 Posts
    Fred said;

    You can use tracert to trace the route Internet data packets take as they travel between your PC and any given server (such as the mailing service that delivers the Windows Secrets newsletters). Tracert shows you how long each segment — or hop — of the journey takes. This lets you see where delays and time-out failures occur.
    Examining the internet header of a received email gives far better information about where email delays are occurring than tracert (How many milliseconds is six hours? )

    And you'd have to do that anyway to discover the name of the mailing service server that originates the newsletter.

    Bruce

  4. #4
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    The Tracert support article 162326 says that it does not apply to my system, which which is Windows 7. It only applies to some ancient versions of Windows.

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Rochdale, UK
    Posts
    1,656
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 161 Times in 139 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by elikam View Post
    The Tracert support article 162326 says that it does not apply to my system, which which is Windows 7. It only applies to some ancient versions of Windows.
    Presumably you are referring to this article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/162326 ?

    If so don't worry. The details posted there are perfectly valid for Windows 7.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •