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  1. #1
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    Diagnosing a noisy - fan?

    Two questions, the first is more important.

    1. My DIY desktop computer has begun sometimes making lots of noise on bootup. It sounds like a fan loudly out of alignment. This has been getting more frequent and I wonder how to diagnose it. A cursory look inside didn't reveal anything though it was not noisy while I was looking at it. Might the loud volume indicate it's one of the more major fans, CPU or PS? When it's loud I've generally shut down the machine at the logon screen and restarted it; after a couple of tries it starts more normally. Just now though I entered the password and let it go to the desktop and it froze before too much was loaded.

    2. Also for completeness, though I'm thinking it's not related, Diskeeper has begun sending me e-mail with this message:

    Disk 1 data
    Information - The following SMART Attributes (Seek Error Rate) are approaching their threshold value.


    I have an SSD boot drive (C and two internal SATA drives (D: and E. Which one would be Disk 1?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    It sounds like it could be CPU related. Open the case when you've had it off for a while, then turn computer on and look/listen to/at the CPU/heatsink fan.
    Do the same for the PSU fan. A faulty PSU fan should have the entire PSU replaced.

    Also take a closer look at the CPU temps with any common temperature monitoring app, CPUID will work just fine.

    Not all case fans are equal;
    Bearing Type:
    1 Ball, 1 Sleeve (4)2 Ball (68)Ball (55)Barometric (1)Barometric Oilless Bearing (BOL) (1)Enter (3)- MoreEver Lubricate (17)EverLasting Quiet (2)Fluid Circulative Bearing (26)Fluid Dynamic (128)Hydraulic (26)Hydro Bearing (10)Hydro Wave (17)Hyper-spin (3)Liquid state (1)Magnetic Barometric (2)Nanoflux Bearing (NFB) (8)Oil System Bearing (11)Rifle (7)Sleeve (100)SSO (17)Twister (8)UFB (Updraft Floating Balance) (9)Z-AXIS (2)
    More info on computer fans
    As you can see from the above, there are many bearing types. My main rule of thumb is, if you can hear [abnormally] it, it's time to replace it.
    There is a very good chance you won't see anything at all amiss, unless it has physically stopped.

    Disk Manager will show you which drive is numerically disk 1.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-11-12 at 19:19. Reason: Additions
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks that's very helpful. I'm really hoping it isn't the CPU fan because I've never removed a CPU without damaging it, or tried to remove a CPU fan, which I assume pretty much sticks to the CPU because of the conductive stuff I placed between them when I assembled the machine. I'd appreciate any tips on how to do that properly, for my general knowledge as well as just in case it's needed.

    Disk Manager. Duh. I knew that. Why'd you think I didn't know that?

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    If it is the CPU/heatsink fan, then just the fan may need to be replaced, not necessarily the entire device.
    It'll depend on what kind of heatsink and fan assembly you've got.


    This will be a good start...
    https://www.google.com/#q=removing+a+cpu+and+fan
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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  5. #5
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    Well I guess it was a newbie mistake even after all this time

    It was the fan in the door to the (minitower) case. I guess I have not been careful enough to make sure all wires and connectors are positioned away from the fan. I should start using cable ties to make the interior neater.

    I've built several machines in the last few years, and they've all been for me, so I have not inflicted this kind of dumb stuff on others. The big advantage of DIY is that I don't have to take it someplace to get it fixed, I can (with help from people like you guys) fix it myself. And in this case, as it is so often, the fix was simple and cheap.

    When I touched the case it actually felt like banging, and when I ran the machine with the door open there was no noise, so I moved the wires and the machine was quiet for a couple of power-ups. Then it got noisy again, but now not a banging but a rattle. Then I could hold the door in one hand while I felt the unit with the other -- and it was obvious it was a vibrating fan in the door. Maybe damaged from all that banging.

    As I say, maybe a newbie mistake, but it's nice to be able to just remove the fan and order a new one. My office is quiet again. Thanks everyone for your comments.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the link. I'm interested to see what that involves.

    Quote Originally Posted by CLiNT View Post
    If it is the CPU/heatsink fan, then just the fan may need to be replaced, not necessarily the entire device.
    It'll depend on what kind of heatsink and fan assembly you've got.


    This will be a good start...
    https://www.google.com/#q=removing+a+cpu+and+fan

  7. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik47 View Post
    Well I guess it was a newbie mistake even after all this time

    It was the fan in the door to the (minitower) case. I guess I have not been careful enough to make sure all wires and connectors are positioned away from the fan. I should start using cable ties to make the interior neater.

    I've built several machines in the last few years, and they've all been for me, so I have not inflicted this kind of dumb stuff on others. The big advantage of DIY is that I don't have to take it someplace to get it fixed, I can (with help from people like you guys) fix it myself. And in this case, as it is so often, the fix was simple and cheap.

    When I touched the case it actually felt like banging, and when I ran the machine with the door open there was no noise, so I moved the wires and the machine was quiet for a couple of power-ups. Then it got noisy again, but now not a banging but a rattle. Then I could hold the door in one hand while I felt the unit with the other -- and it was obvious it was a vibrating fan in the door. Maybe damaged from all that banging.

    As I say, maybe a newbie mistake, but it's nice to be able to just remove the fan and order a new one. My office is quiet again. Thanks everyone for your comments.
    Yeah, I've done that before too. Quite recently, actually.
    I have yet to get around to fixing it...been lazy, and I've got oodles of replacements.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

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