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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Blocking senders

    HOW do I BLOCK incoming mail from senders I no longer want to hear from???

  2. #2
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    What program are you using for email?

    Joe

  3. #3
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thunderbird.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
    Platinum Lounger
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    Ultimately you can't block senders, all you can really do is mark the mail as junk and let the mail program handle it. If it really is spam, blocking the sender is pointless because the sender changes all the time.

    cheers, Paul

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    If you do not like to read the emails, but still want the ability to 'sneak peek' at them, setup Thunderbird to send it to 'Junk box", as per JoeP517 and Paul T.
    If you want to see no evil, setup Thunderbird to 'delete it from server':
    1. Obtain the sender mail server name or hard address from [Menu-View-Message Source. Read the latest line of "Received: from ..."
    2. The mail server name is evil.badserver.com, for example.
    3. In the [ ] is the hard address in 3 groups of digits, such as [123.123.123]
    4. In Thunderbird, menu-Tools-Message filters, create filter item. From the pop-down lists select "Received", and "contains"
    5. Type in the server name, such as evil.badserver.com, that you find from the message source.
    6. If use hard address, type in, for example, "[123.123.123]", or "[123.123." as shown in the message source. Include "[" helps to speed up search.
    7. In hard address (vs dynamic lettering name), be careful on the last group of the digit combo (123.123.xxx, the xxx part).
    Not all servers use up all 255 of last part of the hard address. That is, the first 2 parts are shared (the "123.123" part) by other mail servers. If you enter only the first 2 groups of hard address, all servers of the same address (of the same first 2 groups of digits) will be filtered.
    8. If you use lettering address, the rule will be defeated if the name is changed. The hard address is thus more effective (but cumbersome when more than a few of them, for example, 123.123.67-99, then .201-211).

    Can do same for spam but less effective.
    Spam uses zombie PCs or keeps changing mail servers, so the lettering address and hard address is/are keep changing. Filter the sender name and/or recipient name is partially effective. Some spam hide the recipient/sender name. Though you can get the true names from View-Message Source, they could vary too because spam keeps changing them.

    However, Thunderbird intelligent spam filter is quite effective. Initially you should not set up filtering rules. When receive spam, click junk to I.D. it as junk. Over time, Thunderbird learns it, quite effectively. After that you can set up message filter rules. When a spam sneaks through, click 'junk' to send it to junk folder, as well as teach Thunderbird that it is junk.
    Last edited by scaisson; 2013-11-18 at 19:51.

  7. #7
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    If you're using GMail, for instance, you can go to GMail at Google and set up a filter, to re-route mail from specific senders, to a trash folder. It then never gets down to your computer. Then you can read your mail anywhere in the world, on any computer and you don't have to deal with those emails.

    I do use GMail, but I receive my email at home using both O.E. and Thunderbird, on different PC's with different OS's, so blocking unwanted email at the Google end, works best for me.

    Good Luck!
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  8. #8
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thanx all! I have solved the problem by going to mail.bell.ca and there found an option to BLOCK SENDERS and the problem has GONE AWAY!!!

  9. #9
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    Great!! Glad you got it resolved. Thanks for posting back.

    Joe

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