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  1. #1
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    A clear preference for the next Microsoft chief?




    RUMORS

    A clear preference for the next Microsoft chief?


    By Kathleen Atkins

    In the Puget Sound region, Microsoft is not surprisingly a frequent topic of conversation. Never more so than these days, with the release of Xbox One, the end of the hated stack-ranking employee-evaluation system and especially the question of who will replace Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/rumors/a-clear-preference-for-the-next-microsoft-chief/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

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    Interesting speculation. Lets hope that it's someone who can right the ship and develop more innovation. Most important would be to keep Mr. Gates away; he was fine for capturing the market by being rather ruthless with competition, but that kept Microsoft from innovation. Google has pointed the way forward. If the new CEO captures the imagination of the brightest of Microsoft, the change would be welcomed.

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    I personally don't see Mulally as being the right CEO for MS, unless Bill Gates steps back into a much more dynamic engagement with the company. Tech companies need tech visionaries as well as capable Officers. Mulally may be a good industrial CEO but a lot of technology these days is about trends, sexiness, even a certain thing that cannot be logically quantified such as the fauning of Apple devices by their followers, it's almost like a religious cult. If MS goes into device building in a big way then perhaps Mulally could be good with his industrial background, but otherwise I fear that he'll stifle a lot of innovation, simly focus on cost cutting, sell or close products or divisions, all just to create short term benefits for large shareholders.

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    Ballmer dismissed his likely replacement in Steven Sinofsky, so it's unclear.

    It would likely be best to bring in an outsider, for starters to put everyone at MS on notice that the status quo must end, secondly to jump start innovation. Even if that means bringing in his/her own staff. Personally, I question the release of Windows 8 for desktops/notebooks, as Windows 7/Office 2010 was & still is very popular, as well as their bread & butter, or cash cow.

    MS could have released a tablet OS only & let it be that, while continuing 100% support for Windows 7, which is still climbing in market share. Shame that MS won't offer SP2 for Windows 7 (it's largest by far customer share), though they have for Office 2010. Few corporations can ignore their main stable of customers w/o some loss of customers/market share.

    The next chief needs to keep MS's largest customer base happy, while at the same time focusing on current & future products. And needs to soon realize that the Apple way won't be a success at MS. Note that Apple no longer makes it's fortune on traditional computer sales, but on smartphones, tablets & gadgets. MS is way behind in those 3 areas & should stick to what made the corporation great, Windows & Office.

    Innovation is good, but a corporation as large as MS has to deliver to customers what they want, not what their developers thinks they want. MS went too far, too fast with Windows 8 & it has cost them some business.

    The new CEO hopefully will stop the bleeding & commit to total customer service to it's supported software. Windows 7, unlike XP, is far from dead & hasn't even hit it's peak yet, as all numbers shows. It would be good to see more of a mixture of both Windows 7 & 8 devices (Windows 7 demand is still very high), w/o the extra price tag on Windows 7.

    Cat
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    http://speccy.piriform.com/results/N...gWw3zT1A30RkV3 MSI Notebook (OEM Win 7 Pro x64)

    http://speccy.piriform.com/results/8...3hQlSkXzuDfbKb Dell XPS 8700 w/Windows 8

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    In the field of cell phones, Android is far more popular than windows. The reverse is true of laptops. Android is more popular because it is lightweight and does basically what customers want. As the future comes to us, we will see more Androids on laptops, but perhaps not as much on desktops. Laptops just don’t need the ever increasing bulk of windows in their future.
    I believe that the new CEO needs to properly size the OS’s to their application. Most likely, this means separate OS’s for separate applications.
    Michael

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael37713 View Post
    In the field of cell phones, Android is far more popular than windows. The reverse is true of laptops. Android is more popular because it is lightweight and does basically what customers want. As the future comes to us, we will see more Androids on laptops, but perhaps not as much on desktops. Laptops just don’t need the ever increasing bulk of windows in their future.
    I believe that the new CEO needs to properly size the OS’s to their application. Most likely, this means separate OS’s for separate applications.
    Michael
    Microsoft have gone to great lengths with the last several versions of Windows to re-architect Windows so the kernel is a bare minimum. From there Microsoft can add what is needed for a particular platform. IMO, if a Windows laptop is within a reasonable distance price wise the Windows laptops will be the choice. I think Android is more popular on phones because Microsoft did not have an OS that would address the form factor. Most people I know with Android phones don't care how flexible or configurable it is. What they care about is how the phone looks and how easy it is to use out of the box. Only with the newest hardware do performance issues not appear as often with Android whereas Windows Phone has always run very well on all the hardware it has been loaded upon.

    Joe

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