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  1. #1
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    planning for new computer - advice sought

    Hi all
    I've just ordered a new computer and would like to plan for it before it arrives
    The specs are as follows:
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 BIT (Genuine DVD & COA Included)
    FREE - WebCam
    24" LG HD LED Widescreen Monitor - Black - 5ms - 1920x1080 - DVI/VGA/HDMI
    Logitech (S120) 2.0 Speakers - Black
    Floppy Disk Drive 1.44 MB - (USB)
    memory 16 GB 1333MHz (4x4GB) - (DDR3)
    Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3 (Intel X79)
    Advanced Internal Card Reader 50-in-1
    Intel Heatsink & Fan - Low Noise
    Intel Core i7 3820 (4 x 3.6 GHZ)
    Cooler Master Silencio 450
    FREE - DVI Port to VGA Monitor Port Adapter
    3rd drive - 4 TB Seagate (4000 GB) SATA-III HDD 7200 RPM 64MB
    LG (BH16NS40) 16x Blu-Ray Re-Writer/Reader & 16x Dual Layer DVD/CD Re-Writer - Black (SATA)
    2nd drive - 750GB Samsung 840 Evo SSD SATA-III, Read 540MB/s, Write 520MB/s - Silent
    1st drive - 500GB Samsung 840 SSD SATA-III, Read 530MB/s, Write 330MB/s - Silent
    Corsair RM 450W (Modular) PSU - Ultra Low Noise / Silent Mode

    So I have 2 SSD drives one for the OS and My Documents and one for more frequently used older files and HDD for very old files that I will access less frequently.
    The OS will be located on the 1st drive. The recent newsletter from windowssecrets recommends that I don't move user folders (ie "My Documents") to a different drive, in case I decide to upgrade to Win 8.1 or later in due course, so I plan to keep the older "my documents" folder from my old computer on the 2nd drive and use the newly created My documents folder on drive 1 for files that I create subsequently.
    Good so far? Any improvements to suggest?

    I then plan to backup data from My documents on drive 1 using Karen's powertools Replicator - both to drive 2 (SSD) and to drive 3 (HDD)
    (and also to portable drives from time to time).
    Good so far? Any improvements to suggest?

    I plan to backup the OS using aiomei backupper and also Paragon HD manager pro 11.
    Now my question here is: is it OK to store an OS backup which relates to an OS on an SSD drive on the 4 TB HDD drive or is it better to back it up to the 2nd SSD drive? Or does it make no difference?

    I am aware that catastrophes can occur without warning on SSD drives. Is it therefore possible for the image of drive 1 (SSD) to be copied in usable form, in case of emergencies, to the 3rd HDD drive or would it be easier and more efficient to copy it to the 2nd SSD drive? (I would probably use "easy BCD" to create the appropriate entries in the MBR). Will microsoft's system allow me to do this in any case?

    Just getting my head around all the options at the moment, so if any of you have ideas they would be most welcome :-)
    Thanks David


    PS I've already decided on a name for this new monster: "Bucephalus" :-)
    Kind regards
    David
    dwsolo

  2. #2
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    That promises to be quite a machine .

    So I have 2 SSD drives one for the OS and My Documents and one for more frequently used older files and HDD for very old files that I will access less frequently.
    The OS will be located on the 1st drive. The recent newsletter from windowssecrets recommends that I don't move user folders (ie "My Documents") to a different drive, in case I decide to upgrade to Win 8.1 or later in due course, so I plan to keep the older "my documents" folder from my old computer on the 2nd drive and use the newly created My documents folder on drive 1 for files that I create subsequently.
    Good so far? Any improvements to suggest?
    Why the split of documents between the 2 drives? Space reasons? Actually, if you allow me, why two SSD drives?

    I then plan to backup data from My documents on drive 1 using Karen's powertools Replicator - both to drive 2 (SSD) and to drive 3 (HDD)
    (and also to portable drives from time to time).
    Good so far? Any improvements to suggest?
    You should have some sort of external backup that you use regularly. Although internal drives can be used for backup, I wouldn't use them as anything but temporary backup space. An hardware failure, an electrical problem can compromise all internal drives and you will be without your main drives and the backups, at the same time. I think you should get an external drive and use it as you primary backup drive.

    I plan to backup the OS using aiomei backupper and also Paragon HD manager pro 11.
    Now my question here is: is it OK to store an OS backup which relates to an OS on an SSD drive on the 4 TB HDD drive or is it better to back it up to the 2nd SSD drive? Or does it make no difference?
    As I said before, I would use an external drive as the main backup drive.

    I plan to backup the OS using aiomei backupper and also Paragon HD manager pro 11.
    Now my question here is: is it OK to store an OS backup which relates to an OS on an SSD drive on the 4 TB HDD drive or is it better to back it up to the 2nd SSD drive? Or does it make no difference?

    I am aware that catastrophes can occur without warning on SSD drives. Is it therefore possible for the image of drive 1 (SSD) to be copied in usable form, in case of emergencies, to the 3rd HDD drive or would it be easier and more efficient to copy it to the 2nd SSD drive? (I would probably use "easy BCD" to create the appropriate entries in the MBR). Will microsoft's system allow me to do this in any case?
    I don't really get your intention regarding the 2nd SSD. When you say "usable form", does that mean a clone that you can boot from?
    Rui
    -------
    R4

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Just to clear things up a bit, I do move all moveable files to a separate partition. I have been doing this since Win XP. When I installed Win 7, I continued this. Win 8 was a Clean Install, but I immediately changed the pointers to the data folders on the Data Drive. When I moved to Win 8.1 I used the Upgrade route and had no problems.

    The only consideration when moving from Win 7 to Win 8 was that I had to then change the pointers once again to the Data folders using the standard approved method. Once you have changed the pointers, you are once again using the Data Drive to store all your data. I still find this to be a way to keep my data safer. Some of us use this method, some don't. There is no right or wrong in this issue. I have used it successfully since Win XP and continue to use it in Win 8.1.

    In this way if I have to restore my OS from an Image, I do not have to then restore the data from a separate back up to be back where I was. I also back up all the data on the Data Drive separately from my Images. You can never be too careful.

    I have to second Rui's recommendation of using external media to at least hold second copies of your back ups. Having all backups on the same PC, even in different drives/partitions is asking for disaster. Just ask bbearren. When he had a house fore he lost everything, except I believe his backups that were stored on ext. media in protected storage, or off site, I'm not sure which.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  4. #4
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    Hi Thanks :-)
    Yes, I will of course also use an external drive for data and OS backups but that will be attached only when required rather than being attached permanently (so it's available if by mischance a cryptovirus attacks and encrypts everything on the computer).

    You ask "I don't really get your intention regarding the 2nd SSD. When you say "usable form", does that mean a clone that you can boot from?"
    yes, that's what I have in mind, I just don't know whether it's permissible and/or possible

    The original idea of having 2 SSDs was to have the OS on one and the main data in current use on the other, but as I say I have read that article in the latest newsletter and it made me wonder whether perhaps it would be better to keep current "My Documents" data on the OS drive and use the 2nd drive for less frequently used data. Still thinking about that....
    There are still a few days before Bucephalus arrives, so I'll keep all ideas in mind. :-)
    Kind regards
    David
    dwsolo

  5. #5
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    The different SSD sizes will require you to partition the largest SSD and clone the first one to a partition the same size of the smaller SSD. To be honest, seems a bit overkill, but doable, yes.
    Rui
    -------
    R4

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Are you planning on using on board graphics? I don't recall seeing a GPU card in your specs.

    I too use two SSD drives, one as my primary OS drive and another dedicated exclusively for video encoding and photo manipulation.
    At one time I had three SSD drives, but one of the OCZ drives "kicked the bucket", so I just restored the image of my OS to
    one of the remainders. No problem at all.

    Now my question here is: is it OK to store an OS backup which relates to an OS on an SSD drive on the 4 TB HDD drive or is it better to back it up to the 2nd SSD drive? Or does it make no difference?
    Avoid using SSD drives as storage of any kind. They are meant to be used for apps and processes requiring speedy read and writes.
    Store your images and other data on the mechanical drives.


    Just getting my head around all the options at the moment, so if any of you have ideas they would be most welcome :-)
    Thanks David
    Bump the PSU capacity up to 750W and get a real GPU card.
    Dump the antiquated Floppy drive, it's completely useless. USB is far superior .
    Cut down the SSD drive sizes to something more reasonable, like 120 or 240 GB and save some money for the GPU card.
    Consider two 3TB drives as opposed to the monstrous 4TB drive.


    Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3
    120 to 240GB SSD drives.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2013-12-20 at 18:36.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
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    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Bump the PSU capacity up to 750W and get a real GPU card.
    Whether you need a GPU card or not is dependent on your application. If you are not a gamer, chances are the inbuilt graphics are just fine. You can always add a card later if you determine you need one. I've been running my Windows 7 desktop for 5 years now and it still runs fast for me. I'm not a big gamer and it runs Photoshop just fine. None of the PCs I've built for clients and friends have a real GPU card either.

    Jerry

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwitalka View Post
    Whether you need a GPU card or not is dependent on your application. If you are not a gamer, chances are the inbuilt graphics are just fine. You can always add a card later if you determine you need one. I've been running my Windows 7 desktop for 5 years now and it still runs fast for me. I'm not a big gamer and it runs Photoshop just fine. None of the PCs I've built for clients and friends have a real GPU card either.

    Jerry
    Ya, but this system is so overbuilt in some respects that it would just be the oddest thing if it didn't require a $500 graphics card to round out performance. Like a body builder who bench presses all day long but doesn't care a bit about the legs as long as they reach the ground!

  9. #9
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Just about anything is better than the on board graphics.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Your eyes and brain interface with the display, the quicker 'things' happen, the less faults you'll pick out while waiting, don't neglect it

    The effect of GPU acceleration on Photoshop CS6 benchmarks: http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/art...eleration-161/

    There will be a similar effect on web browser performance with anything that is written to use hardware acceleration, Flash videos, for example.

    A graphics card that doesn't require a direct PSU connection (sub 75W TDP) would be as high as I would go on what I consider to be a lower quality 450W PSU, a HD7750 (ensure it has (G)DDR5 memory) would be my choice (as would a Seasonic/XFX PSU).

  11. #11
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Better, certainly. Needed, not always. On board graphics have come a long way in the last couple of years. The inbuilt graphics in the Intel Core I5 and Core I7 is pretty good. I've heard the inbuilt graphics on the AMD chips is also pretty good but I don't have any experience with them.

    Jerry

  12. #12
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    Javascript is increasing in importance in terms of web usage and in some cases, performance still lacks. I see that on my 2013 laptop, running an i5, where some Javascript is still rather slow for my taste, so I can understand getting a better graphics card, Jerry. I was never a guy to buy expensive cards, but I am bit unsatisfied with integrated graphics performance, at the moment.
    Rui
    -------
    R4

  13. #13
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Um, I just checked the specs on that i7 3820, there is no on-die GPU; unless you plan to use it as a 'headless' server or remotely, a PCIe graphics card will be required.

  14. #14
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You're right Andy. I should have checked the specs first.

    Jerry

  15. #15
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Javascript is increasing in importance in terms of web usage and in some cases, performance still lacks. I see that on my 2013 laptop, running an i5, where some Javascript is still rather slow for my taste, so I can understand getting a better graphics card, Jerry. I was never a guy to buy expensive cards, but I am bit unsatisfied with integrated graphics performance, at the moment.
    It all depends on your application. I still contend that for the average user that uses his PC for casual web browsing, reading Email, and creating an occasional document, inbuilt graphics is fine. An SSD will give you a better bang for your buck.

    Jerry

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