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  1. #1
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    How to upgrade XP to Windows 7

    My friend has an XP computer and he is hoping he can upgrade it to Windows 7
    --- Iíve never done one so I need your help on it

    His XP computer: HP Pavilion a1600n desktop XP SP3 (It was originally Media Center Edition 2005) but he had a friend at work install a fresh XP OS about 2 years ago. CPU: 2.00 gigahertz AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core. Installed RAM 4 GB.
    HDD 137.43 Gigabytes Usable

    I ran Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor: It doesnít report any problems.
    The report includes Youíll need to perform a custom installation of 32-bit Windows 7 and then reinstall your programs
    --- All system requirements are met: Windows Aero support, CPU speed (2.0 GHz). 3.5 GB RAM & 87.4 GB HDD free space

    I read Upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...ows-7#T1=tab01
    --- It appears to me this article means he has to have a fresh Windows 7 install disc
    --- Is this true? (I was under the impression he can buy a Windows 7 license from Microsoft on-line)
    --- I cannot find what it costs to do such an upgrade. Can someone fill me in on how much it does cost if itís possible to do so?

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger lumpy95's Avatar
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    You can't upgrade XP to Win 7, you have to get a win 7 disc with a license and do a fresh install of Win 7. You can buy a win 7 disc on AMAZON, NEWEGG, etc.
    You will need ALL windows 7 compatible drivers for that system ( if any hardware/software on that machine can't get win 7 compatible drivers, that hardware/software won't work ). The very first thing I would do is go to HP support and see if they have updated drivers for that model to win 7 drivers!! If not, you are going to have a rough time going to Win 7 ( a lot of your hardware/software won't work anymore ).
    If they do have updated drivers, download all of them and put them on a disc to install after installing win 7.
    I have a HP Pavillion Dv5000t laptop that works great on XP but HP never put out any win 7 drivers for it!!
    Hope this help's.

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  4. #3
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    Ya, the system is upgrade-eligible but you'll need to perform a custom (clean) install with a Win 7 upgrade disc.

    My guess is everything will be fine as far as drivers go, I've upgraded about a dozen 2004-2006 systems with similar components (HP a1547c, a1130n, and a1228x among them) and they've all gone very well, all the drivers needed were included on the disc or through Windows update though I may have started off with a wireless USB key to get online on some of them to get Win updates. Quite often the NICs are Realtek-based and they have drivers.

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  6. #4
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    I am not aware of Windows 7 being bought as a download. Amazon can be your best bet. Upgrade licenses seem to be around $170-200 and the cheapest I found was, surprisingly, the Ultimate version: http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Wind...remium+upgrade


    I think the upgrade advisor usually does a good work of warning about possible issues, so if it cleared you, probably you are good to go. Do image before, anyway, just in case.
    Rui
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  8. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Theoretically you could download the Windows 7 ISO of your choice, burn it to disk, then clean install.
    You will not be able to activate until you've purchased a product key, but you should be able to do so from within the Windows 7's "get more features" section on the "system/WEI" page.

    I highly recommend that you;
    Research your current system for updated Windows 7 drivers.
    Image & backup your current XP OS.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

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  10. #6
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    Thanks everyone for your inputs, as I was concerned about what does upgrading mean since I've never done one
    So if my friend had Windows 7 Home Premium but wanted to upgrade to Windows 7 Professional, that’s an upgrade
    But since he has XP and wants to “upgrade” to Windows 7 he is actually replacing the XP OS

    Although the Windows 7 upgrade advisor didn’t find anything any issues, I have the following concerns
    --- Some Windows 7 OS’s software I found are bundled with DDR3 memory chips but the memory chips in my friends computer are DDR2’s. I don’t know the technical differences between them but unless I knew better I wouldn’t bank on maximum performance without the correct memory chips technology
    --- There are plenty of OEM Windows 7 OS software and I did find some retail full versions but for the price I’m going to recommend to my friend to look into refurbished Windows 7 computers. I just bought a very nice Windows 7 Professional desktop with 4GB DDR3 memory for $244.00 for my brother and it runs excellently and I’ll be glad to find another like it for my friend
    --- I did go to HP's website and the only driver available for this sytem has to do with Lightscribe
    ------ I'm not interested to find out what it takes to replace his XP with Windows 7 unless it's a natural process. It's not my pc and I won't be there when something goes wrong and he starts wondering about what's going on
    --- I’m also going to have him consider Windows 8.1. Not because I want to spend his money. But I’m pretty sure he can find a nice $600.00 - $700.00 modern computer, which over the course of 10 years averages out to $60.00 - $70.00 per year

  11. #7
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    The terminology can be confusing as you can see upgrading as moving to a more recent or more powerful version of an operating system,so any of your scenarios would be an upgrade. However there is also the old upgrade vs. clean install "dispute", in which you actually do this movement from old OS to new OS within the operating system and the process tries to use some of the settings, configurations, documents or even programs from the origin OS installation - this would be a more restricted sense upgrade. Under the broader former definition, you could be "upgrading" by clean installing the new PS - a clean install can also occur from within the origin operating system, but in this case no settings, configurations, documents, etc,are kept from the old version and you have a pristine Windows installation.
    Some people are totally against the "restricted" form of migrating to a new OS, although i must confess it has been the one I have used the most over the years I have been using Windows, without really no relevant issues.

    You can also consider another vision of an upgrade, one of the several Microsoft can have. This vision usually determines if, from a licensing point of view, you can buy an upgrade license, usually considerably cheaper, instead of a full license. To be able to do so, your paths in terms of origin OS and destination OS are usually preset - you need to choose from an usually limited set of possibilities, which also have technical implications in terms of what you can maintain from the origin OS (if anything).

    So, yes, terminology can be confusing .
    Rui
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    R4

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  13. #8
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    Thanks Rui Very good explanations. I wouldn't have an issue upgrading my friends computer but I am going to be helping the non-profit organization I volunteer at with their 4 XP's; they also have 2 Vista's; but I'd like to see them all have either Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 computers so everything is consistent on the work they have to do. I'm not an expert so I rely on common performance and consistency. And this is where WindowsSecrets is very helpful to me.

  14. #9
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    Clint thanks for the website for the Windows 7 SP1 ISO.
    --- My cousin has a Windows 7 laptop and doesn't have any discs or backups even though I've recommended them
    --- So if his computer crashes, it looks to me like I could use the correct ISO (Windos 7 Ultimate) and he would have to purchase the product key

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