Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Bronze Lounger Drew1903's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,492
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 108 Times in 86 Posts

    Exclamation Keeping your cool

    Electronics and certainly PCs do not like heat. It is important that these devices stay cool @ all times and throughout their lifetime. That said, here is one of those "Best Practice" things that I suggest all too often does not even occur to people and that they do not think about or do on any kind of regular, periodic habit.

    Spend $5 and keep a can of Dust Off on hand. Shut your machine down, open it up and rid it of dust. Clean fans (CPU, GPU, P/S & case), vent openings be they perforations or grills. Do this, at least, monthly.

    We vacuum carpets, dust the surfaces in our houses, mop floors, etc. But, many Folks all too often forget about or neglect consistent cleaning of their computers. DON'T!

    As an aside, if this is ignored long enough a layer of dust can accumulate between the CPU fan & its heat-sink. Eventually this can impede the (cooling) airflow to the CPU causing it to overheat past its threshold temperature and cause the machine to shut down. In this state the CPU fan must be removed so the layer of dust can be removed. Do not let things go to being that bad.

    I do recommend installing & using Core Temp. This little utility will constantly show the core temps of each CPU core. This avails you easily knowing if your machine is running nice & cool or not 'breathing' as well as it should and becoming a wee bit too warm.

    Cheers,
    Drew

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,185
    Thanks
    209
    Thanked 213 Times in 205 Posts
    This is why I always recommend that people get a desktop rather than a laptop, unless they need mobility. It's far easier to remove the dust from a desktop than from a laptop.

    One time I had a big TV (the old, heavy kind of TV). It began to fail. I opened it up, blew out the dust, put the cover back on, and turned it on. It had no problems after that.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manning, South Carolina
    Posts
    6,474
    Thanks
    211
    Thanked 848 Times in 780 Posts
    Drew,

    Good advice! If I may add one thing, just remember to place a pencil or such in your fans to keep them from turning before blowing on them with the compressed air. The bearings in these fans are known to wear when run at the speeds the compressed air will cause them to spin. I've read this information in many reputable places so I'm just passing it on.
    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    VBA Rules!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs


  4. The Following User Says Thank You to RetiredGeek For This Useful Post:

    Sudo15 (2014-01-17)

  5. #4
    Bronze Lounger Drew1903's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,492
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 108 Times in 86 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    This is why I always recommend that people get a desktop rather than a laptop, unless they need mobility. It's far easier to remove the dust from a desktop than from a laptop*.

    One time I had a big TV (the old, heavy kind of TV). It began to fail. I opened it up, blew out the dust, put the cover back on, and turned it on. It had no problems after that.
    *Absolutely! Plus desktops are just basically easier to work on, change or add components (upgrade or update), labour costs are lower and hardware (parts) often less expensive.

    Cheers,
    Drew

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •