Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 132 Times in 86 Posts

    Taming Chrome's excessive drive activity




    LANGALIST PLUS


    Taming Chrome's excessive drive activity



    By Fred Langa

    The Chrome browser can keep a hard drive in almost constant use. Here's how to take back control. Plus: Rescuing files from an infected drive, security concerns with the Open Source JV16 Power Tools, and more on recovering unallocated hard-drive space.


    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/taming-chromes-excessive-drive-activity/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Western New York State
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Regarding "Rescuing files from an infected drive" I believe an even safer way to recover Paul's photos would be to disconnect his current drive, connect his infected drive and boot from a Linux boot CD. This way there is no possible way to infect his current drive. Then copy his photos from the infected drive to a re-writable CD and scan them for infections, deleting any infected photos.
    Finally revert to his normal set up.

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    RE: Cloned partition sizing

    Acronis True Image Home v11 (and probably all later versions) offers to clone a drive (1.) by duplicating the original partition sizes, which wastes space when going to a larger disk (2.) proportionally, which reduces/increases the original partition sizes by the same percentage to allow full utilization of a drive larger or smaller than the original (3.) with manually sized partitions, allowing partition sizes to be juggled while using all of the space on the destination drive. The free cloning software I have tried does not offer this kind of flexibility.


  4. #4
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lanshark View Post
    RE: Cloned partition sizing

    Acronis True Image Home v11 (and probably all later versions) offers to clone a drive (1.) by duplicating the original partition sizes, which wastes space when going to a larger disk (2.) proportionally, which reduces/increases the original partition sizes by the same percentage to allow full utilization of a drive larger or smaller than the original (3.) with manually sized partitions, allowing partition sizes to be juggled while using all of the space on the destination drive. The free cloning software I have tried does not offer this kind of flexibility.

    I have the greatest respect for the capabilities of ATIH (v.10 upwards) regarding the flexibility of cloning vs. imaging options.

    The idea is to use a Partition image rather than an exact Partition Clone. This way, the Image can be restored to a partition of a different size from the original partition. Macrium Reflect Free isn't as flexible as ATIH, but the WinPE version of its Rescue Media can offer some of this restoration size flexibility. There are other free imaging programs which also offer good amounts of flexibility.

    But it seems to me that one of the features which nearly all vendors reserve for their paid editions, is the ability to have full flexibility when restoring partitions. Going from an original larger partition to a smaller partition during a restore is not easy to accomplish, and we often find ourselves paying for this feature.

    Were it not for the occasional need to use such advanced features, I don't think I'd ever recommend a paid imaging program. For me, the need to do this sort of thing doesn't arise often enough to justify the expense of paying for ATIH. Others may have different needs which make the price (and the cost of upgrades) worthwhile.
    -- Bob Primak --

  5. #5
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Abour Chrome and Disk Swapping:

    Under Windows, Chrome (and most other browsers) never leaves the hard drive without some chatter. This is partly due to the browser refreshing data in its caches, but it is also related to Windows itself, which does a significant amount of disk swapping just to keep the lights on. So while a RAM Disk may greatly reduce Chrome-induced disk chatter of the kind which interferes with Windows Sleep Modes, Windows itself will contninue to induce disk activity.

    Since we are talking here about Windows Sleep Modes, we can discount the Windows OS-induced activity, as Sleep Modes compensate for this. But if Chrome (or any other Web-connected App) is open when Sleep is invoked, there is always a chance that the computer will not Sleep properly, or may wake up unexpectedly. That is inherent in Web-connected Apps under Windows.

    I use Linux, and due to its many differences from Windows, even with a browser running, little or no disk swapping happens at all (unless I stream videos or something invokes Flash Player). The No Swap characteristic of Linux allows me to Sleep or Hibernate anytime, without having much concern about the computer not Sleeping, or waking up unexpectedly. Since the Suspend is from RAM, not a disk-swapping state, I can reserve my Linux Swap Partition for only holding the Hibernate recovery data. What this demonstrates is that a well-designed operating system does not need to be constantly exercising the hard drive, with all the disadvantages this constant disk activity can have -- especially in terms of wear on SSDs.

    If you have enough system RAM and enough processor cores or hyperthreads, Windows 32-bit XP and lower can be oprearted entirely in RAM. In this way there is only hard drive interaction when the user specifies something is to be saved or retrieved. I don't think Windows 64-bit Vista or higher can be opreated entirely in RAM, but I'd love to hear from anyone who knows how this can be done. If operated entirtely in RAM, Windows can do exactly what my Linux does -- and almost never experience interference with Sleep or Hibernate. Except maybe when playing videos from the Web.

    Running a browser entirely in RAM also has security advantages, as the entire RAM Disk can be firewalled and sandboxed.

    Something to think about, as developers move toward Windows 9.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2014-01-25 at 13:13.
    -- Bob Primak --

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •