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  1. #46
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I appreciate the info, and I have high regard for the opinions of those who post here, so I will keep this in mind.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    I appreciate the info, and I have high regard for the opinions of those who post here, so I will keep this in mind.
    It's not a matter of malware compromising the Windows kernel, it's of compromising both TeamViewer and the Windows kernel and compromising TeamViewer in a way that it would send malware laced commands. To be honest, I find this absolutely improbable (I won't say impossible, but it's close).
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  3. #48
    Silver Lounger mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I remember well the hotel computer I used at a Marriot (or perhaps a Holiday Inn). It was chock full of adware -- stuff kept popping up, and it would bring me to places that I didn't ask it to. I don't know exactly what was on the computer, but I wouldn't be surprised if viruses and other malware were on it.

    I surfed around a bit on the computer. But I didn't go to any sites which required my username/password. And even though I have the highest regard for the people who post here, no one could have convinced me that it would have been safe to do so on that computer.

  4. #49
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    You can run a remote TeamViewer session via browser as long as the app is installed on the target system. The link is near the top right of the team viewer main page; just log in and you have an https session available.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
    I surfed around a bit on the computer. But I didn't go to any sites which required my username/password. And even though I have the highest regard for the people who post here, no one could have convinced me that it would have been safe to do so on that computer.
    I saw no one suggesting that, quite the contrary. I would never use any of my relevant account login details on an unsafe computer.

    That should not be confused with the possibility of infecting the host computer by the means of a remote session from an infected computer (that does not involve the transfer of infected files).
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  6. #51
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    So, to summarise....

    For what it's worth - I've used teamviewer to access both my own PC at home (as the original poster wants) and to remote control friends and family's at their request.

    I have also remote controlled the home PC using the teamviewer app on a tiny samsung phone running android 2.3. once you get the hang of moving the cursor to scroll the screen its the least clunky small screen remote control app I've used.

    The post with the most informed and accurate info in this thread (IMHO) is Rick Corbett's #22 which mentions both the full install on the home PC and the portable version run on the remote device. There is also the standalone exe (TeamviewerQS) which does not remember passwords etc like the portable version.

    The key thing is to choose the option to install as a service on the home PC. I forget whether you choose that at download or at install (it was a while ago).

    I agree with many other posters that it's beyond the realms of probability that adware or malware can be transmitted via a remote desktop link (and the risk would be the same for logmein, gotomeeting,etc). But don't disregard the possibility of keyloggers that might be on the hotel PCs. The latest version offers two factor authentication to cover that as well though I have not used it.

    Also - big hotels will probably have some type of Kiosk software installed that resets the machine to a predefined image at each boot - so you're 'only' trusting the IT staff rather than the previous user.....

    You'd need to test remote wake-on-LAN, and or disabling hibernate/sleep modes...
    http://www.teamviewer.com/en/help/40...ewer-work.aspx
    Last edited by flippertie; 2014-02-09 at 09:17.

  7. #52
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    Windows Remote Desktop Connection has been around for years, I think, originally for landline connection to your home computer, and it’s still part of the system. ‘Part of the system’ equals ‘free’, unless it’s only on a version you don’t have. Maybe someone knows the history of it, but I was surprised to not even see it mentioned.

    If you want a bit of security you can set the home computer to accept a password-protected login only during certain time slots. I had it all set up at one time and never got around to using it, but I think I’ll take another look at it as a result of this thread.

    Update: visit the KB for Remote Desktop Protocol to view details of the setup for Win 8, Win 7 and Server 2008.
    Last edited by dogberry; 2014-02-10 at 00:51. Reason: Update

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogberry View Post
    Windows Remote Desktop Connection has been around for years, I think, originally for landline connection to your home computer, and it’s still part of the system. ‘Part of the system’ equals ‘free’, unless it’s only on a version you don’t have. Maybe someone knows the history of it, but I was surprised to not even see it mentioned.

    If you want a bit of security you can set the home computer to accept a password-protected login only during certain time slots. I had it all set up at one time and never got around to using it, but I think I’ll take another look at it as a result of this thread.
    Using RDP to connect to a home computer is much more complicated to setup than LogMeIn or TeamViewer, because most home computers use dynamic IP addresses and it also requires setting up port forwarding in the router:

    Use Your Computer From Anywhere: A Guide to Remote Controlling Your PC


    Quote Originally Posted by dogberry View Post
    Update: visit the KB for Remote Desktop Protocol to view details of the setup for Win 8, Win 7 and Server 2008.
    That only details how to install an updated version, not how to actually configure a connection.


    Bruce
    Last edited by BruceR; 2014-02-10 at 11:31.

  9. #54
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    I'm not sure if this is related to my recent installation of TeamViewer or not but tonight when I returned from walking the dog I was greeted by what was clearly someone remote accessing my computer. The cursor was tracking around the screen attempting to open the sign-up information page for the website that I had left open. I quickly disconnected my cable modem. There was no on-screen indication as is common to TeamViewer and Logmein hosts when being accessed. I reviewed open processes in Task Manager and didn't see anything unusual but that's not surprising to me. I also removed TeamViewer (possibly for no reason) and scanned for malware with nothing other than the normal assortment of suspicious cookies getting flagged. Any suggestions for avoiding future incursions?

    I must say it was the darnedest thing to see the cursor dancing around the screen before I dropped the ISP connection - definitely not in a good way.

  10. #55
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    @700wlw, welcome to the Lounge!

    For any installed Remote Access software that's set to run at boot up, ensure that there's also a secure password/phrase set. If it's not set to run at boot, ensure you fully close/exit it after each use.

    There's a large number of bots scanning IP ranges specifically for RDP-type access, it's commonly used by businesses so the potential pickings could be very rich if they hit on a weakly-guarded ingress point.

  11. #56
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    Wake on LAN via TeamViewer seems like a scam as, when done remotely, it requires another already awake computer on the LAN. In other words, it will not work if all the computers on the LAN are off. The nature of Wake on LAN is that it only works over a LAN. So, to wake up a computer, it needs to be done from an already running computing device on the same LAN.

    The computing device can be a router rather than a computer. A number of Asus routers include Wake on LAN that does not require a computer on the LAN to already be awake. You logon to the Asus router and tell it to wake up the desired computer. Much better solution.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    No, only potential ownership of the home PC and whatever it might contain.
    Citation that this has ever happened or is even possible over a remote protocol?

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Have to agree with satrow, here. You enter one password in an unsafe pc and you are exposing yourself to big, big problems. I would never do that, tbh.
    So... in the absence of prima facie evidence, can we agree to advise the OP to use a strong and unique password for a remote connection to a Teamviewer Host as an alternative to pure conjecture?
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2014-02-13 at 15:14.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    So... in the absence of prima facie evidence, can we agree to advise the OP to use a strong and unique password for a remote connection to a Teamviewer Host as an alternative to pure conjecture?
    There is nothing about conjecture in advising someone not to insert passwords, that allow access to valuable resources, in a computer where you don't know what is running. I wouldn't even call it a good practice, just a common sense one. It's preventative behavior, which is way better than risking compromising someone else's system and data.
    Rui
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  15. #60
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Hotel lobby - sleep-in night concierge tempted to increase his income - CCTV.

    Data logger already installed on the lobby PC.

    Just 2 instances of where no remote protocol is needed to gain access to the data needed to own a remote PC and all it contains.

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