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  1. #1
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    What is the best way to setup 512GB SSD & 4TB SATA System?

    I have tried to read all over the boards before asking this, I have built a new computer and I have a Maximus VI Hero mb Samsung 840 Pro 256gb SSD SATA II & a 4TB st4000dm000 with 64mb cache & 16GB ram & Intel I7-4770K & a Blue Ray writer.

    I normally just research this and figure it out on my own I have been in the industry for over 30 years but I had an accident about 3 years ago and I have serious memory and follow thru issues now so I can't trust myself to do this and I have been a subscriber to your newsletters etc for years and have sent many people to do the same you always have the best information. I have some questions if you could please advise.

    1. As I understand it, the SSD should be the boot drive and load the OS on it. but what about the HDD for storage / data. How should it be setup as?
    (a) D:\
    (b) A folder under the OS like c:\4tbhdd\ {however that reads funny if you look at the C: it only shows a little under 250GB on the SSD drive but if you go to the C:\4tbhdd\ it shows the 4tbdrive availability }
    (c) Something else and if so what?

    2. how to configure the HDD should it be setup as drive like drive D or as a folder within the os like c:\4tbhdd\ what is best

    3. I like the idea that I can reinstall the OS at anytime or upgrade without loosing my data by having the OS on the SSD as well as programs. BUT what are the risks that programs I install will put their data on that drive even if I custom install and direct data to go to the other drive and how can I reduce or remove those risks?

    4. I was going to change the default locations of Documents, Downloads, favorites, Links, Music, Pictures, Videos by right clicking on the folder and in the properties go to the location tab and move to the same folder name but put it on the 4tbhdd. do you advise this? and if so what other folders or is there a better way?

    5. What about the hidden folder under the user name i.e c:\username\AppData\ and the folders under it ? I realize that those are critical files like my 9gb outlook.pst file should they be moved or will that really screw up my system speed?

    6. Are there files or folders like what I listed in above that need to be on my SSD drive for speed but should be copied to the 4tb sata drive for data reliability / backup reasons

    7. Is there something that I'm forgetting?

    8. I have been a Action Pk subscriber since the beginning so I have multiple os options to install (win 7 Pro etc., Win 8.1 etc.) I'm not real comfortable with win 8 it kind of feels like win 4.x this will be used in my home network as my primary computer what do you advise?

    9. After doing some reading I realize I probably should have gotten a HGST 4tb hdd for reliability instead of what I got. so what do you advise is the best backup option? I have looked at internal Raid 10, or setting up a external Raid 10 or a off site backup service and if so do you advise one? I have lots of family photos and other critical information I would not want to loose. I could use BluRay or M disks as well?


    Thank you in advance for your advice and help. I hope my questions will be helpful to others as well.

  2. #2
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    My personal preference - and the one that seems to be favoured by the WS boys and gals - is to set the SSD as C:, the primary drive and leave all your data in the standard location on the SSD. This provides maximum performance and doesn't upset badly behaved programs.

    I use a mechanical disk to store my audio and video because they are too big for my SSD and I only need sequential access - to play them - so an SSD provides no particular advantage. I have a second mechanical drive for daily backup of data and irregular image backups. Because I'm paranoid - my data is worth more than most of the things I own - I have a USB disk that I store in a fireproof safe after copying the backups over once a month(ish).

    I have purchased a backup program - less than $60 - that backs up my data every day and creates images and allows me to recover to new hardware. That is cheap insurance and cost less than the external hard disk.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
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    External backup doesn't necessarily need to be RAID 1,5, or 10 because even those need to be backed up (or serve as the backup) but I use NAS devices including a couple simple WD MyCloud drives so those can be accessed by other devices through DNLA or folder structure aware devices; like an HDTV that can then play the photos as a slide show as such without involving the computer. That way I get a little double-duty out of them. Cloud backup or DVD-BluRay backup could be a third optional safety net backup for the most critical files.

    As far as the internal drives go, you could move the data folders to the 4TB drive but also just use the Library feature of Windows 7 to point only to a Photos folder for example on the 4 TB drive and have it ignore the local accounts. Once programs are told once where to go for data and where to save it, they generally keep using that location, and Windows 7 always will if that's the only place listed in the library for that type of data. I used to be against Libraries as being too confusing for most but I've warmed up to them specifically in this regard as a reliable redirect mechanism.

    You've got a SSD that should have plenty of room for OS and programs unless you're loading up on Steam games or something, I wouldn't make too many changes other than those needed for data storage.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

  4. #4
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    F.U.N.
    Thanks for the reply, I have a NAS (a DNS-323) with drive mirroring.

    I'm not sure what you mean by moving the date folders to the 4tb drive but to use the library feature of win 7, I am sorry to say but I have never even used that any direction where I can get a basic understanding of how it works or how to do it unless its not to bad and you can give me a brief example.

    am I to understand that the data would be on the SSD but the library function would copy it to the 4TB?

    NOt a gamer so that isn't an issue, I am just real concerned with info I can't afford to loose, so I was trying to be cost aware but also keep it simple to preclude that it might not get done.

    whether that is a off site paid service an internal back up or a vpn to my son's house across town.

    what is better to setup the 4TB as a directory off the C drive or to setup it as a Drive device like d: ?

    thanks

    I'm putting loading more on hold till I know how to configure the drive.

    for what its worth I'm on Uverse with their modem / router then a E4200 running DD-WRT and then upstairs I have another E4200 as a switch and an accss point but not the server

  5. #5
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    am I to understand that the data would be on the SSD but the library function would copy it to the 4TB?


    Just the opposite, you would save and retrieve data from the 4TB drive; the library function would point to those chosen folders on the 4TB. Think of the library as an index in a book, except because it is digital, you can write exactly what you want as an index. So you could remove the default local C (SSD) drive index pointers and have them only point to the 4TB locations. The alternative is to use the Microsoft approved method for actually moving your local user data folders to the 4TB drive wherein the Library index will be automatically updated to point to those folders on the 4TB drive. So either method results in the Library index being customized, the only difference is if it's by you or by the operating system.

    No spanning of drives recommended here, keep the SSD the C drive and the 4TB and any partitions as separate drive letters.

    If the NAS is intended for backup, perfect. I use Snycback Free set to a schedule that runs once a day but there are many competent backup programs.
    Also if you don't want to purchase off site cloud backup, again, son's house across town is perfect as long as you both have unlimited bandwidth. I use GBridge vpn to back up off site to friend's place a few miles away. Also check out CrashPlan for free backup to an external drive or a trusted Internet-connected computer drive.
    Sent from Windows ME thru Opera 10.63...just before they crashe

  6. #6
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    Here's what I would probably do if I were in your spot:
    -- I would use the SSD for the OS and for program installs, as well as downloads of software and other "install" type items.
    -- I would create two partitions of 2TB each on the traditional hard drive, and I would use those two partitions for data (documents, pictures, spreadsheets, email PSTs, etc).

    Here's my rationale for the above:
    -- SSDs are more likely to fail than are traditional hard drives. But they are a lot faster than traditional hard drives. Therefore, I would put the often-accessed stuff (programs and the OS) on the faster drive, and I would put the less-often-accessed stuff on the slower drive. This would also put the more important, harder to replace stuff on the drive which is less likely to fail.
    -- By putting only the data on the traditional hard drive, it will be really easy to back up the data -- simply back up the entire drive.
    -- Drives larger than 2TB are very new technology. Being very new, it is possible that there is more possibility of failure and incompatibility with everything else that you have. That's why I would limit my partitions to a maximum of 2TB in size.

    The above is certainly not the only way to go. But based on the challenges that you say that you are facing, I believe that it is a safe and relatively uncomplicated way to go.

    I am sure that you know this, but be sure that you do regular backups.

  7. #7
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    I would set the SSD up as the C: drive and the 4TB drive as the D: drive (one large 4TB partition, there is no need to create smaller partitions - I have 2 4TB drives and each is a single partition, I've had them for over a year and have never had any problems with them, they are both about 2/3rds full). And then map all of your home folders (docs, pictures, etc., even the AppData) to the D: drive. This is what I did and it has worked well for me. My 256GB SSD is less than half full, even though I have installed a number of apps and games. Once a month I image the C: drive, and I backup only my D: drive.

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