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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    A question on Readyboost and another on 720p video

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben09880 View Post
    ...

    Got a spare USB drive? See if you can enable ReadyBoost on it. don't immediately go out and try this if you don't already know about it, there are certain pitfalls to be weary of

    ...

    I regularly work on machines ranging from DOS through every version of Windows, up to and including 7. There are ways to get even a lowly 486 CPU to decode 720p videos in realtime in DOS, if you know how.
    This may be a bit off topic, perhaps this is better in it's own thread or in a private message, but:

    1. What are the pitfalls of ReadyBoost? (Wear on USB device?)
    2. I'm intrigued to know more about getting a 486 CPU running DOS to play 720p videos

    Thanks

    ec5772

  2. #2
    3 Star Lounger bassfisher6522's Avatar
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  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
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    Hey! Sorry I missed this, it must have been put into a separate thread after the notification email...

    ReadyBoost attempts to wear the drive evenly. I suggest using a USB stick exclusively for ReadyBoost. I have not worn a stick out completely yet.... When it wears out, the capacity slowly drops.

    As far as 486 doing 720p... Theres a DOS program that does it.... I *think* called QView. I'll see if I can still find it hosted...

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger
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    I use an SDHC card in Notebook slots for ReadyBoost, seems to be a bit faster than a USB Thumb/Flash drive. I haven't found a need for ReadyBoost on those with 6GB or more RAM unless heavy into video or large spreadsheets/data bases. To me the reason to have ReadyBoost was for those older computers that are hardware/BIOS limited to less than 4GB, e.g. my Dell Latitude D810 or HP Pavilion dv1000 at 2GB. Most of the 2GB Notebooks can't run 64-bit Windows so are limited to 32-bit and its limit of about 3.5GB..

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