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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    SSDs for Desktop

    The article last week piqued my interest in a small SSD to run Win7 on a desktop. One, what SSDs are recommended (I have 90 GB used in my current C drive). Two is how would they install in a standard desktop bay, my machine is SATA 2. Three is what software is needed, will the current Acronis do the job.

    Thank you

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    If your going to go for the smallish SSD drive, and that's anything under 80GB, you will need another internal drive to store much of your data.

    1. I recommend at least a 120GB SSD, and keep it a minimum of 50% free at all times.
    2. All you need is a standard SATA port on your motherboard. You're likely to have at least 4 ports.
    3. Restoring an image with Acronis to the new drive should work fine provided you don't attempt to restore
    an image of 90GB worth of data on to a drive less than 120GB.

    Loose the bulk of that 90GB's you have on the current drive, get it down to 30GB, and you should have no problem with an 80GB drive.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  4. #3
    Gold Lounger
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    Why leave 50% of your fast expensive drive unused? Fill it up to 90% and let it rip, Windows won't mind.
    Agree with the need for a second drive, also useful for a backup of the SSD.

    If you restore an image to the SSD you must align it. http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...5-Aligning-SSD

    cheers, Paul

  5. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Why fill up an expensive SSD with stuff that's got no business being there in the first place
    when performance & stability will be much improved with less data on the primary.

    You've got plenty of SATA ports on the mobo, use them, install an extra drive, and offload the bulk.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  6. #5
    3 Star Lounger bassfisher6522's Avatar
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    One, what SSDs are recommended
    My recommendation is the Samsung 840 Pro or the 840 Evo, 256 GB.

    how would they install in a standard desktop bay
    This is done in a couples of ways. Depending if the SSD comes with a mounting bracket for 2.5"/3.5" is one way. Another would be if the HDD cage had a built in bay for a 2.5" SDD. With most after market cases, that option is built into the cases these days as my Thermaltake Overseer RX 1 does. The mounting holes are built into the bottom to the slide out 3.5" HDD bay. Another way is Velcro with the adhesive backing, then you can physically mount the SSD anywhere.

    my machine is SATA 2
    Most SSD's are SATA III (3), and are backwards compatible.


    what software is needed
    Most SSD's come with migrating software, either with the SSD or as a download. Some even come with the USB adapter and software disc. Personally I would do a clean install on a new drive, whether it be an HDD or SSD.

  7. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    I already migrated to SSD. So far, very happy. Much faster power-up+boot time.
    If it is a laptop, it is cooler too. Compared to the original spinning drive, the exhaust air is now barely warm. In a desktop PC, this would not have any importance because of, comparatively, huge volume of empty space.

    As for leaving more SSD space unused, I prefer it that way for now.

    From my research and from others, even here in this forum, SSD is not as reliable as the spinning cousin. All the more you need a complete image backup AND a normal backup (to migrate back to mechanical drive).

    SSD has limited write life time. SSD automatically writes to different area/memory cells to even out the write cycle, thus making sure to extending the write life time. If SSD is nearly filled, it is forced to reused/rewrite to the same memory cells.

    Is it paranoid? Maybe.
    A system main drive goes south is quite traumatic, impacting productivity and creating time pressure. Then the anxiety to repair. SSD is still too new; not enough on-the-field stats to prove its reliability. Mechanical hard drive has a very long service history, stats and data.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    I already lost one SSD in my laptop, but I had a recent image backup so it wasn't very traumatic. It was replaced under warranty and I was back up in a half hour after I received the replacement. I used the original hard drive while I was waiting for it.

    Jerry

  9. #8
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    SSD is still too new; not enough on-the-field stats to prove its reliability
    SSDs are made of the same stuff used in your computer memory and is reliable. It's used in enterprise grade disk arrays all over the world and just works. As always you should have a regular backup because electronic devices do fail.

    SSD has limited write life time
    According to this bit of work you can expect in excess of 50 years from your SSD. Even if you only get 10 years you're laughing.

    I already lost one SSD in my laptop, but I had a recent image backup so it wasn't very traumatic
    A sample size of one does not a study make.

    Fill 'em up and let 'em rip!!

    cheers, Paul
    Last edited by Paul T; 2014-02-05 at 01:39.

  10. #9
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Paul,

    I'm sorry but I have to take exception to this statement in the interest of clarity for the average user.
    SSDs are made of the same stuff used in your computer memory and is reliable.
    Computer memory (DRAM) is dynamic memory and forgets it's contents when denied power. Although your computer may contain small amounts of (SRAM) static memory it is not what most people think of when you say computer memory. SSDs on the other hand are persistent memory devices that retain their contents when the power is turned off. An SSD is made of the same devices as Camera Cards and USB Keys (Flash Memory).
    HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    VBA Rules!

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  11. #10
    2 Star Lounger JC Zorkoff's Avatar
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    My first SSD was a Corsair 64GB from Newegg. It started to show SMART statistics that indicated impending failure after about 1 year.

    I replaced it with an Intel 520 series 120GB and it has been solid for over 2 years (it comes with a 5yr warranty). I bought another one for another desktop and it has been solid for over 1 year. I check them with a utility called "SSD Life"

    I hear OCZ has gone bankrupt, so I would avoid them.

  12. #11
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    OCZ has a terrible reputation for drive failures. Toshiba has bought out OCZ so future drives may be more reliable but I would take a wait and see approach.
    SSDs, like Hard drives are subject to quality issues on a model number basis and what is reliable changes from year to year. They are prone to fail without warning so just as with hard drives, you need to have a good backup strategy in place. I do not have any reservations in using SSDs from a reliable vendor - Intel, Samsung, Crucial, or Corsair.

    Jerry

  13. #12
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    I have at least one or two of just about every major brand (including 2 or 3 OCZs-they only had a problem at one point fairly early on as far as I know) and the only brand of SSD that's failed me so far is a 128 gig Crucial M4. That said the Crucial 500 240 gigs are on sale for a short time at Newegg for $120 with promo code.

  14. #13
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I've had 2 failures on an SSD drive. Unfortunately the same drive failed twice, once within a year after purchase, then the brand new replacement
    failed several months later. OCZ was the culprit, and it wasn't a cheap drive.
    Fortunately my OCZ PCIE REVO drive is still going strong without a hiccup.

    SSD's are not yet in the reliability league that mechanical drives are in, not yet anyway, so you had better have a decent
    backup regimen in place. But still, SSD's are well worth the cost, and potential failures, when measured against mechanical
    drives in terms of performance.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  15. #14
    3 Star Lounger
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    From what I know, OCZ uses comparable and reliable components as other SSD makers. However, OCZ chose to push the speed limit, to differentiate themselves in the market.

    Unfortunately, SSD has to mimic a hard drive, in order to use the same hard drive bus (IDE, SCSI, SATA, iSCSI, etc). The job is handled by an in-house controller chip. The many lines of software codes, timing delays, [logical] race conditions, ... complicate matter. OCZ is in the wide consumer market, such pushing-to-the-limit requires a delicate balance. With wide environmental variations, application failure begets returns. This could be a major problem for OCZ.

    SSD itself is simple, and fast, leaving mechanical drive in the dust. Flash memory cells are quite reliable too ... by itself. It is the controller chip and the firmware that are the bottleneck and pinch reliability.

    I think SSD makers should create a PCIe card with their own simple and fast access bus. Call it iSSD or something. Get rid of the on-drive complicated controller. Instead, use a simpler one with simple software codes. Over time, their own bus, iSSD, will be just as ubiquitous as IDE, SATA. Much faster too. And SSD will be much simpler to build.

    Hard drive history is that way. They off loaded bus management to the PC. Not only saved cost, also lowered failure rate(!).
    I'd like to add that it is not cheating. A truck construction should not include road building. If the road [SATA, IDE] is for hiking the truck may have to be built like a tank. Very inefficient.

  16. #15
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    I don't know if you will see this since this post is fairly old.
    Regarding scaisson's last post about SSDs put on PCIe, I have seen several ads for what looks like just that. I haven't paid that much attention to the info so I checked it out on Newegg. I found several, INTEL has one with 1GB/sec read! Very expensive though!

    Bill

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