Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 28 of 28
  1. #16
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rome, NY
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I use a drive dock with an eSATA port to back up least monthly...fast, fast, fast. One platter drive to back up my boot drive, one platter drive to back up my data drive. I simply plug in and clone with Acronis, deleting the previous clones. Then I store them in a safe at another location. I've kept a "clean n fresh" clone of the whole system from immediately after I first installed the O/S and my programs too...who needs to do a fresh install of the O/S when you have a clone of the original? I would still have to install updates of course, but that's relatively painless with a fast internet connection.

  2. #17
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
    For allanhm - I've used Backblaze enough (with restores only for versioning ands test purposes) to like them too. They are very open about their model (see their blog). Are they the tier-one, multi-location, heavily redundant, for sure available under any circumstances provider? Nope. Cheap? Yup. They are only a part of my backup model; Backblaze is for when all else is lost but I've survived and am restoring something from different location (or when someone has changed a file and wants yesterday's or last week's version).

    For leeshor - I wouldn't have the cloud as my only solution, much for the reasons you note. But when your customer's business burns down, or the hurricane, tornado, or earthquake hits and there is no local backup, I'm willing to pay a big "deductible" to get my data back. I think of cloud backup as inexpensive insurance with a high deductible in case of loss. I'm (well, hopefully not) going to be starting with new equipment, in a new location, buying software if I need to - and then restoring the data that the business relies on to get back in business. If your customers are multi-sited across large geography, then backup to other sites can work too. For small local businesses, I think the cloud has a place.

    Phil

  3. #18
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    32
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
    .
    You left out an important variation on one backup method, Fred, which is to back up to a removeable secondary, internal hard drive. Being removeable means that the drive is not going to be affected by whatever happens to the master, plus less wear and tear, plus making it easy to store off-site. And, being internal, the process runs at disk drive speed.

    Currently I have three drives in plug-in trays to which I sequentially clone my master drive, making restoration after a disk disaster fast and easy. My data doesn't change too frequently, so I clone one of the three every week, giving myself backups for my backups. Other fringe benefis are that I never have to do the dvd shuffle or the USB cable tangle tango. Cloud-based backups would make sense if it weren't for issues of security, speed, and trust...

    Did I miss anything?
    .

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to lanshark For This Useful Post:

    DavidPierson (2014-02-13)

  5. #19
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    What about off-site backup to an external drive on a friend's PC. Combines the advantages of cloud and external drive approaches. Didn't see that mentioned. CrashPlan free is a very easy way to achieve this.

  6. #20
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    "Cloud-storage/backup services are now extremely common."

    It's common but where is it exactly storing your Information? Why would anyone with common sense want to place the contents of their computer on a server, only God knows where it's at! It is bad enough that all of the Big companies are already spying on us without our permission, now these companies want us to surrender our information voluntarily... I'm very Leary about surfing the Internet today because everybody and their Mother is spying today. I'm truly surprised that anyone has fallen for this Cloud backup.

    I back up to three different outside drives that are connected to my computer with three different backup systems. Acronis True Image, Paragon Back up and an old faithful, Storage Sync. Each one is setup to backup to a different drive! One drive holds images, another full computer backups and Increments and the last one holds my Documents, Music and Pictures. Being that it's all automated, I only have to periodically check to see if everything is going as planned.

  7. #21
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by amazon13 2010 View Post
    It is bad enough that all of the Big companies are already spying on us without our permission, now these companies want us to surrender our information voluntarily... I'm very Leary about surfing the Internet today because everybody and their Mother is spying today. I'm truly surprised that anyone has fallen for this Cloud backup.
    Paranoid, much?

  8. #22
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    32
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by lanshark View Post
    You left out an important variation on one backup method, Fred, which is to back up to a removeable secondary, internal hard drive. Being removable means that the drive is not going to be affected by whatever happens to the master, plus less wear and tear, plus making it easy to store off-site. And, being internal, the process runs at disk drive speed.
    I recall when as one of their dealers, Victor introduced the removable second hard disk drive. It was called an "ADD-PAK". Easy to remove at the end of the day and lock into a safe.

    In the desktop I've just stopped using, I'd installed one of the StarTech, trayless SATA, hot swap drive bays on the front. But it had no protection for the drive.

  9. #23
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Graeagle, California, USA
    Posts
    32
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks Fred for the heads-up about mapped network drives versus UNC resource notation. I've updated my Acronis tasks accordingly.
    Bill Stanton

  10. #24
    New Lounger phillipnolan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Backup convenience is important.

    Fred,

    Have been enjoying your articles since Byte days, but i think you overlooked a number of issues.

    Here are 2 additional significant points that are important to consider for your article.

    1) since this backup system is for end users not data centers, it MUST BE CONVENIENT. My experience has been that the use of any backup system is inversely proportional to the complexity (or difficulty) of completing the backup.

    2) it must be relatively robust and convenient for transport off-site. in a disaster scenario, a backup destroyed in the same fire/flood/theft, etc that destroys the computer is worthless.

    In my experience the dock/cartridge scenario fits both requirements by being conveniently hot-swappable and protected by an enclosure for transport.

    I use RDX drives and cartridges. These are internal or external docks that hold drive cartridges of various sizes.

    note: for these products, the external usb3 docks have significantly higher transfer speed than the internal sata 1.5 Gbps docks.

    i generally recommend this system IN ADDITION to a cloud backup and a network backup.

    Optical storage has another major con: limited storage. CDs are 640 Mb and DVDs are 4.3 Gb. To reach anywhere near usable capacity you would need to use blu-ray discs.


    tim

  11. #25
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hello All,
    For a number of years, I have been using the free version of Macrium Reflect for backups. I have two laptops; one is really a 'desktop replacement', it boots from a 120 gig SSD that actually has about 60 gigs in use. Data is stored on a 1 tb internal drive. It takes Macrium 35 minutes to back up both the hidden system drive and the OS drive. I keep 3 consecutive backups on a 1 tb external USB drive; I delete the earliest backup each time I perform a new backup. I follow the same guidelines for the laptop I take with me on the road. With it, I replaced the original hard drive with a 750 gb drive which I partitioned; I put the OS on a 100gb partition that has 45 gigs in use; the remainder of the drive is for data. Again, it takes about 35 minutes for Macrium to back up the hidden system partition and the OS partition. I put the original 250 gb hard drive in an external USB enclosure, carry it with me on the road, and again keep the last 3 consecutive backups on it. Several times, I have restored the hidden system partition and OS partition on both machines, one time on the road, which REALLY saved my bacon! (I carry a rescue CD with me when out on the road)

    BTW, I keep my data files on four LARGE flash drives that are with me when I am in my office as well as when I am on the road. I back up all data to the 1 tb external USB drive at the end of each day when I am in my office.

    Works for me . . .
    Regards,
    Bob

  12. #26
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    My Win 8.1 system image backup will not recognize SkyDrive as an acceptable destination; it apparently will only accept an external hard drive or a network destination. Is there a way around that? I couldn't find one in Google searching.

  13. #27
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Hi Jon,

    You could backup to an external and then copy that into SkyDrive, I suppose. But is it necessary? As posters have said above, the cloud is "for when all else is lost but I've survived and am restoring something from different location". It's going to use a lot of net bandwidth to backup a system image.

    For me, my cloud backups are for my customer's data, the stuff they really care about. I don't reckon system images are worth backing up to the internet. But I don't get bushfires cyclones or floods where I live :-)

  14. #28
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    NJ USA
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Good article and looking forward to next in series. I would also like to see a discussion of the various types of backup software and methods for using them.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •