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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Renaming files fun (not really)

    Ok, here I am again to bring you yet another of those nonsensical error I love so much.

    I'm trying to rename a file that contais the word "WE" (both letters in capital). All I want to do is change that to "We", with only the W capitalized. Easy as pie, right? Well, no matter if I change it to "We", "we" or "wE", the name changes but after a couple seconds (more or less) it reverts back to "WE". To add more fun to it, I can make any change I want to the rest of the words of the file's name, it's just the WE word that won't change.

    I'm using an administrator account, it is not a permissions issue (I can open, copy, move or delete the file) and the file is not in use. So, any idea what might be happening?

  2. #2
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    This is standard Windows behaviour. You need to rename the file twice to fix it, first adding or deleting a letter, second changing it to the correct spelling and case.

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
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    Windows files are not case sensitive, so you are not actually making any changes. As Paul says, you have to rename it to something different (ignoring case) then rename it back to what you want. In Linux, file names are case sensitive, so you could have done what you wanted easily. Anybody know what the situation is on Macs?

  4. #4
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    I've already renamed it many times and in many ways. For example, I changed WE to WEst with no problem, then tried to rename that to West and it remained WEst. Tried to remove again the 'st' and decapitalize the E at the same time and it ended 'WE' again. No matter what I do or how I try to change it, the 'WE' always remains 'WE' with both letters capitalized.

    Edit: Thx, access, now I get the point. I'll check if that works
    Last edited by Sanael; 2014-02-20 at 08:43.

  5. #5
    New Lounger
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    Seriously, this is absurd. Changed the 'WE' word for a different word (I think I used 'can'). Then renamed it again to 'We' and it automatically converted it to 'WE'! I'm getting frustrated xD

  6. #6
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    It always works for me in a Command Prompt window - provided the target filename is enclosed in capitals.
    For example:
    ren till_we_meet_again.txt $dummy
    ren $dummy "Till_We_Meet_Again.txt"


    No obvious reason why it works!
    BATcher

    Time prevents everything happening all at once...

  7. #7
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    Didn't work either. But I hadn't thought about using a command prompt and , ironically, it shows as 'We' there while WExplorer keeps showing it as 'WE' no matter how many times or in how many ways I change it. Kinda weird.

  8. #8
    WS Lounge VIP access-mdb's Avatar
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    Is it any file starting WE or is it more general? Have you tried copying the file to another (similar) name, deleting the original then renaming the copy? I have to confess, this does seem very weird....especially as I can't replicate the problem.

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