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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    Windows XP to Windows 7

    I am planning on doing a clean install from Windows XP to Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit SP1 OEM Build. (DVD). It states the following on the box: "If the individual software license is for a desktop operating system or application software, it also must be preinstalled on the hard drive of the fully assembled computer system , using the OEM Preinstallation Kit (OPK). My question: Do I have to be concerned with the OPK, or is furnishing just the Product Key sufficient? If just the Product Key, where would I find it? (I have not opened the box containing the disc in case I have to return it). Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    It should be on a sleeve of the disk box/packaging, obviously, they're not going to want to display it somewhere
    where it can easily be gotten to without opening the package right up.

    Are we talking about an OEM system builders disk?
    You should be fine, except that when you sell or give the computer away, the disk goes with it.

    I've used OEM system builders disk before, but I can't recall dealing with any OEM Pre-installation Kit.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2014-02-24 at 22:21.
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    Nomad (2014-02-24)

  4. #3
    Lounger
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    Yes, it's a Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 32bit System Builder OEM Windows

  5. #4
    Super Moderator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    The OPK is for when you are creating factory installations, i.e. an assembly line of new Windows OEM builds where you want to automate the install and subsequent OOBE (Out Of the Box Experience).

    You do not need to be concerned about it nor need it for a single install from OEM media.

    As CLiNT mentions, the OEM media and COA (Certificate Of Authentication) stay with the PC... they are not transferable, as per the EULA (End User License Agreement).

    Hope this helps...

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    Nomad (2014-02-25)

  7. #5
    Lounger
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    Yes, it's a great help. Thank you so much, both of you, Clint and Rick.

  8. #6
    Star Lounger
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    Anybody knows?

    - When will Windows 7 PRO
    Security Updates stop?
    April 2016, April 2017?

    Win XP Security Updates stop now,
    on April 2014
    ...XP-PRO becomes an unusuable, insecure OS.

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SF99 View Post
    Anybody knows?

    - When will Windows 7 PRO
    Security Updates stop?
    April 2016, April 2017?

    Win XP Security Updates stop now,
    on April 2014
    ...XP-PRO becomes an unusuable, insecure OS.
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...ucts/lifecycle

    Extended support for Windows 7 (the type now ending for XP) will end in 2020.
    Rui
    -------
    R4

  10. #8
    2 Star Lounger
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    I have to ask the question, how old is your Windows XP computer? I mean, if you are going to install a non-transferable Windows 7 OEM version, and the computer dies soon or you simply feel the need for more performance, you won't get your money's worth from your W7 disk purchase.

  11. #9
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    I built a new system and installed the previous OEM Win7 Pro on it with no issues.
    Had to call Microsoft to get a new Key/code, told them the box broke and I'm reinstalling.
    No problems.
    P.S. The old box did break, but the new one was not a rebuild, but a brand-new, different hardware.

  12. #10
    Lounger ruosChalet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAdu View Post
    I built a new system and installed the previous OEM Win7 Pro on it with no issues.
    Had to call Microsoft to get a new Key/code, told them the box broke and I'm reinstalling.
    No problems.
    P.S. The old box did break, but the new one was not a rebuild, but a brand-new, different hardware.
    I built my original desktop and installed XP-Pro (OEM version) on it. In the decade since, I have replaced virtually all the hardware due to failures or need to upgrade. When the motherboad went bad, I went from discrete cards for video and LAN to on-board support. I had to re-activate a few times, but only called Microsoft once. As long as I did not sell or dispose of a working computer system, I did not heed the "OEM is tied to the hardware" mantra. Violation of the EULA? Technically, maybe, but so far no microsoft thugs have turned up at my door.

    Another misconception about OEM versions is that they are restricted or crippled versions of their retail counterparts. For example, I often hear that you cannot do a clean install with an OEM disk. Not true. The main (and perhaps only significant) restriction to OEM is that you must look to the OEM for support -- not Microsoft. You still get updates and free online support, you just can't call Microsoft for help with installation or setup.

    I am very optimistic that I can purchase Win7 OEM and continue until its end of life. I'll probably build a new box just as I did a decade ago. So, for all those like RAdu and me, who want to keep a stable operating system while replacing or upgrading the hardware, it can be done without apparent issue. If you are not running the OS on more than one machine at a time and don't need Microsoft to hold your hand, you should be well within your rights to maintain the hardware without being told you are in violation of the EULA. RonR.

  13. #11
    2 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...ucts/lifecycle

    Extended support for Windows 7 (the type now ending for XP) will end in 2020.
    more accurately, Microsoft will end extended support for all editions of Windows 7 w/ Service Pack 1 on January 14, 2020.
    support for Windows 7 original/RTM release ended on April 9, 2013.

    before upgrading from XP to Win7, I'd install the Windows Easy Transfer 7 program (wet7xp_x86.exe or wet7xp_x64.exe) on an XP OS to gather program settings & documents and transfer them to the Win7 OS.

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