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  1. #16
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rfarmer View Post
    I recently installed an Ubuntu based distribution called LXLE alongside Windows XP on my old desktop. Installation worked like a charm and now I can boot to either one. In addition, my wireless printer installed with a couple of clicks after I figured out how to do it. I was amazed at how easy it was. However, doing something as simple as creating a desktop shortcut took a week of emails to the help desk where the main respondent was ultimately helpful but didn't immediately know how to do it. I still haven't figured out how to get Windows Shared Folders with WiFi working from LXLE although it works fine with XP. The problem is that LXLE needs SAMBA or some other additional program to use Shared Folders over WiFi, but I haven't found anybody who can explain it to a Windows user, and this seems to be common in the Linux world. Namely, there are many LINUX distributions and they are all different. Few Linux experts know all of them and even fewer can provide clear explanations to a Windows user who is not familiar with Linux terminology. There are also many Linux websites that offer help to Windows users, but once again, the advice given by these websites only works for specific distributions and I have found it difficult to know whether the advice applies to my situation. So I think Linux probably CAN replace XP; the problem is getting or finding help when something doesn't work.
    Linux and Windows do have networking issues. Sharing, naming of Devices, Permissions and Group Policies head up a host of difficulties in any mixed network. Even in a pure Linux network, some of these same issues can crop up.

    Also, dual-booting on older hardware with smaller drive capacity is not necessarily a good way to go. If XP is desired to be retained, adding a second drive or using Linux from and external USB drive may be a better way to go. LXLE is most likely one of several "little Ubuntus" developed in recent years for Home Theaters, ARM tablets and dongles, and other tiny tech devices. A full-scale laptop should be able to handle Mint or Ubuntu (32 bits). Mint has a smaller resource footprint than fully-configured Windows XP.

    Both Ubuntu and Mint have active online forums which are friendly to Windows refugees like myself. I haven't ever had to post my own problem, as a keyword search almost invariably turns up several relevant and recent threads for most issues. Just be sure to include the exact distro and version number as terms in the keyword search for your issue. Don't rely on advice for other versions, other distros or other hardware. And avoid lengthy Command Line Gibberish or BASH scripts. I also avoid WINE solutions. But that's just me, I guess.
    -- Bob Primak --

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  3. #17
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    Thank You,Bob.
    Going with Mint 15 to start,will install on secondary drive of 500g,400g available.
    If you'd like to mention which sites to look for answers in,i'm all ears...
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  4. #18
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    Hi Silas

    My computer spec is similar to yours.

    There's some good advice there above, but as someone who has switched successfully to Ubuntu 12.04 in the last six weeks, there are a few points I'd like to emphasise.

    Firstly, nearly all the promises are good: there will be a learning curve, your main problem, but you should soon be able to do most of what you need to, and find a way to do all the rest.

    If like me you’re moving away from XP because of April 8th, then bear in mind that if you set up a dual boot system you can keep on running XP safely offline as well. Maybe come online only in short necessary bursts.

    One of the problems with Linux is that because it is genuinely free, there are many distributions, versions, because individuals have branched out in their own ways, provided their own versions.

    I suppose we will all recommend what we’re familiar with. RMallen says he’s using Ubuntu 14.04 which I thought was coming out next month. Bob Primak is using 13.04. That’s the 2013 version.
    I’m using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS from 2012. That LTS is important. It means Long Term Support which means that more effort is being put into making that version stable and getting help from the Community. Check out Ubuntu Forums as well.
    Check out Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, if and when that’s operational.

    Are these three versions similar? Other loungers may correct me, I think they’re similar to Ubuntu 8, 9, 10 ….

    One problem I found in my switch: the terminology. On an Absolute Beginners board I found that the level of understanding expected from me was high. But I persevered, and once I got the system working – with an online connection just happening without effort (three cheers) I could pick away at the problems and solve them.

    Two other tips: the Ubuntu\Linux community is generous with its support. Download the exact version of the Getting Started With Ubuntu manual for your computer.

    Try it first. Meaning, create for yourself a hard copy of the DVD of your chosen version. Set the BIOS to boot from the DVD. Run Ubuntu from the DVD. Don’t install. Just use it and experiment. If you’re reasonably happy, take the plunge. Go for dual boot, and Windows XP is still accessible.

    We owe these OS engineers a great debt.

    Russell
    Last edited by RussellXPD; 2014-03-20 at 12:38. Reason: omission

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  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by silas View Post
    Going with Mint 15 to start,will install on secondary drive of 500g,400g available.
    Any particular reason why you're going for Linux Mint Cinnamon 15 instead of the current release - Linux Mint Cinnamon 16, released November 2013?

    It seems to boot faster than Linux Mint Cinnamon 15 and the Software Manager appears to be snappier than its predecessor (and apparently uses less RAM).

    Just my opinion but there's also a couple of new additions I've found useful, for example the new USB stick formatter with NTFS and FAT32 support (as I'm still very much in a mixed Windows/Linux environment).

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  8. #20
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    Thank You,Russell,that is the plan. XP will remain on c drive and i've cleared ample room for Mint and any other Linux on d,the secondary.3 hard wired external drives will save docs,vids,etc.,hopefully for access from either os.Two hard drives which i disconnect are home to the backups. So far,i'm hearing my Nvidia 5500 shouldn't have display problems.
    Rick, Cinnamon 15 is the latest found available by mail order,gotta start dancing somewhere,i guess. Thanks to You,i'll upgrade asap.
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  9. #21
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    I've been preparing for a similar move for months, after using the site OSDisc.com to order/have mailed, Live/install optical disks for $2.95 each.

    The site has a complete listing of scads of Linux offerings (free shipping on orders over $20, generally in my hands within 2-3 days) with complete descriptions, spec's, etc. You can distribute them to your friends to freely make legal ISO copies.

    By loading the live-disk upon bootup (revising your BIOS, if necessary, to boot from disk first) you'll quickly see what the various flavors have to offer and discover if any of your peripherals are not recognized by specific distro.

    If your XP pc is spec'd to successfully run Win7, then select to dual boot the Linux version of your choice for belt & suspenders security. We're on Win7 and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, with Ubuntu used almost exclusively.

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  11. #22
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    Thanks Wenkoe !
    The more options the better.

  12. #23
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    Enjoying this talk about replacing XP with Linux.

    So, I wondered if there is a way to replace Windows 8 (with its nasty BIOS hardware)? I am sad to say that I bought a laptop and don't like Win 8 and can't revert to Win 7 due to the BIOS. Several yrs ago, I played with UBUNTU on an old XP until the MOBO burned out. I wasn't a serious LINUX guy and never replaced that computer. I would replace it with my laptop if I could.

    So, please let me know.
    Paulbyr in NC

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  14. #24
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    Hi Paul,win 8 pro is downgradeable. See this:http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2832566
    Maybe upgrade to downgrade?
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    Hi Silas
    It's good you're moving forward. You mentioned a concern about space for the dual systems. Linux\Ubuntu appears to count space across existing partitions, and when I had an extra external drive plugged in, it reported an extra 1Tb of usable space. I don't understand this yet but it suggests capacity won't be a problem.

    Paulbyr
    Silas is right about Win 8 being downgradeable, as I found out today. It opens up a new range of possibilities. The trouble with all these new situations though is that you need to talk to someone who knows that precise issue. You should be able to fix on a suitable Linux option on any normal Windows setup.

    Russell

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  17. #26
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Bob Primak is using 13.04. That’s the 2013 version
    Not anymore. I am using Ubuntu 13.10 and intend to upgrade again to 14.04 after seeing what folks say about it for a few weeks. 14.04 will be the next Long Term Stability Release (LTS).
    -- Bob Primak --

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  19. #27
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    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS,
    ( the next Long Term Stability Release),
    should be available April 18, I believe, (and hope!).

    Hey!
    That's only 10 days
    after Microsoft stops its XP security updates...

    An Ubuntu Linux "LTS version"
    gets longer support than a "normal non-LTS release"
    -- 5 years rather than 9 months.
    Good....

    Ok...bye Microsoft!
    Last edited by SF99; 2014-03-28 at 08:54.

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  21. #28
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    I would not hesitate to start a new OS with Ubuntu 14.04 in April but I find upgrading an existing Ubuntu with working applications better to wait a few months. There are always little configuration changes to look up for the first month or so. Let someone else figure those out and have a "no issues" upgrade later.

    I was lazy and upgraded 13.04 to 13.10 just last month and there was still one parameter I needed to look up and correct to keep Mythweb (a web front end for the MythTV home theater program) running.

    In general, mainstream Linux distributions will be simple to set up and run but the out-of-the-ordinary applications often need a little tweeking after every upgrade. You usually just need to google the application and the Linux version to see how someone else has already solved the problem. Once every 6 months I need to re-learn how to open an administrative text editor and how to run the 3 or 4 main command window administrative commands because I have forgotton how to do that. Obviously if I lived in Linux every day and had to work with Windows once every 6 months I would have similar problems.

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  23. #29
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    This topic has slipped away a bit from Silas' original concerns - are you okay now, Silas?

    But it seems a suitable place to raise a few issues for those of us braving open source OSes.

    I note you've moved up, Bob, to Ubuntu 13.10 and will go to 14.04. Ed McG is not the only one holding back on quick adoption. I'm not going to rush to 14.04. Yes, there could be a few bugs to slow down the early users. But my take is that 12.04 is a LTS and will be supported for a while yet. I'm pretty new to this and I don't fancy the extra risks involved in moving from one OK system to another one when it's not essential.

    From Silas' point of view, he settled on Linux Mint Cinnamon. Hey, if it works, keep it going until there's a need to move.

    Two thoughts: there are mostly techies\ geeks working in open source, then there's us bootstrap people, everything we do is an experiment, and risky. Fortunately Linux\Ubuntu is pretty robust and our humble efforts will usually pay off.

    The other one is a question: If you go on to some of other tech discussion sites: ZDNet, Tech Republic, How-toGeek and lots more, it seems that the only solution for the XP emigrants is more Windows. Linux\Ubuntu doesn't seem to get a look in. What on earth is going on?

    Russell

  24. #30
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Agreed, and I did not mean to take the thread off topic.

    The original question does deserve some consideration. As do the issues which can make Linux migration difficult. My own experience was that my hardware (hybrid graphics) caused some issues. Hopefully, these will be less of a problem with the shift from X Windows to Mir in Ubuntu 14.04.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2014-03-30 at 04:19.
    -- Bob Primak --

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