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  1. #16
    3 Star Lounger
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    Stick with XP for now. Make sure you have a good anti-virus program such as AVAST FREE or AVG FREE, etc. Use Chrome browser. Don't surf to porn websites. Don't open emails from anyone you don't know. And never, ever slap a man who's chewing tobacco. Follow these suggestions and you'll be OK for several more years.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to starvinmarvin For This Useful Post:

    suvi (2014-04-10)

  3. #17
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    To all of you who have replied, I thank you for your advice. We decided to purchase a computer with Windows 7 installed with capability of being upgraded. Now I need to get a good reference book for 7.

  4. #18
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    Go with Windows 7-64 bit, unless you are absolutely sure that you need 32-bit. (You very likely don't.) The only reason you would even want to consider 32-bit is if you have old software or devices which will not run in a 64-bit environment. There are a few such items, but not many. I'd prefer upgrading those devices and software, rather than going with 32-bit Windows.

    And make sure that it will allow for at least 6 GB of RAM, but preferably 8. (It doesn't have to come with that much, but you want to be able to expand in the future.) It needs to come with a minimum of 4 GB of RAM. Anything higher than these numbers is good.
    Last edited by mrjimphelps; 2014-04-10 at 14:52.

  5. #19
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    If you got the HP 3500 desktop with Win 7 Pro and Win 8 disk for later, you got a very good computer, and one of the very few that comes with both and an easy upgrade with the included disk to 8. I used many of those for my customers in the same boat as you find yourself in, and the systems were good quality, fast, and easy to setup. Used them since January 2013 and no issues from any of them.

    You likely won't need the reference book for 7 past having the comfort of it nearby after you get going with 7. If some of your programs will not run on the 64 bit system just keep your old computer with a KVM switch which lets you switch back and forth between two computers using the same keyboard mouse and monitor. So long as you just run the XP programs offline like Photoshop or video editing programs, all you need to do is copy the results to a USB drive or SD card and transfer them over to the new one. Just keep it off your network and the Internet and the XP machine will be safe for as long as it runs. If you don't have room for two boxes then just take the drive from the old system and use it in an external drive dock that can be had new for under 20 bucks today in USB 2.0. Then you can access all your files from it on the new computer using 7.

    Excellent question because many more are in the same situation and don't want to ask. The very good responses on this thread will help more than just you.

  6. #20
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suvi View Post
    To all of you who have replied, I thank you for your advice. We decided to purchase a computer with Windows 7 installed with capability of being upgraded. Now I need to get a good reference book for 7.
    Your best resource around, next to the lounge of course, is your very own search engine;
    https://www.google.com/#q=Windows%207%20guides
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  7. #21
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    I have the advantage of age, 72yo. So I'm looking at all aspects of this debate. I remember somewhere around 1980 I got a Franklin Apple compatible computer. Then along comes DOS/IBM/Microsoft and software prices on these machines just dropped. Apple had it all but kept it closed and expensive. Commodore before this was a great favorite of mine....Hmmm 64k, what programs were written on that small memory/hard drive storage. I tried Win8. Microsoft should have had some actual users input before putting out their first edition. Don't think I need to go much into what I think about that system. Win7 is really a good system but I always am curious. So I got a Google Chromebook, what you say....heresy! Win7 is still my favorite but for older people I have to recommend Chromebook. It is the most bulletproof and simple and reasonably priced computer around, especially the new Intel Op System. So, for old people, I would certainly have someone look at the Chromebook. My how time passes, I speak about old people and........I am one. Anyway, my 2 cents for what it's worth. Should you have an adventuresome elder, have them go ahead and put a co-operating system on also, I added Saucy Salamander, should keep them entertained for awhile.

  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannerjs View Post
    Win7 is still my favorite but for older people I have to recommend Chromebook.
    IMHO Google Chromebook is just an expensive web browser. Try using one without a fast internet connection and you won't get very far and the on-line apps (including MS Office) available for it aren't suitable for serious computing (I'll grant you that few retirees are likely to be concerned with that - unless they're into photo editing). For the same price you can get a fully-function laptop with an order of magnitude more storage.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  9. #23
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    Hi Paul,
    Methinks you spoke in haste with no actual knowledge of the Chromebook. Mine is an Acer 720, Haswell processor, 4gb ram, and, I'll grant you, only 16gb memory. It comes with 100gb cloud. I am ignorant of the WiFi speeds in Australia but 1mb/sec would certainly be enough. If there is mostly dial-up at 56k then things would be slow. It does have a USB 3 port so just how much fast memory do you need internally? Then, if you put on the Kubuntu, Ubuntu, whatever, you have a high speed fully functioning computer that will process video, image editing, whatever. It starts up in 8 sec and needs no virus protection. Runs on battery for maybe 8 hours. Hdmi port with fine video processing. Best of all, old folks would have a hard time disrupting any aspect of the system. It cost US$ 250. Maybe that is a lot in your world for a fine computer but not in mine. It is certainly more than just an expensive web browser.
    From the Old Guy

  10. #24
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    I think you've just proved my point! I can use my laptop anywhere, with or without an internet connection. As a student, I take it to Uni, libraries and so on, where I cannot rely on wifi. When I travel, I often go interstate or overseas, to places where I have regularly have no wifi connection (even in the US & Canada). Don't try that with a Chromebook. As for "needs no virus protection", just give it time until the installed user-base is enough to make it an attractive target for virus writers. The same claim used to be made for Macs, Linux and so on. Only the ignorant make such claims now. Add "Kubuntu, Ubuntu, whatever" and you'll definitely need AV software.
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by suvi View Post
    To all of you who have replied, I thank you for your advice. We decided to purchase a computer with Windows 7 installed with capability of being upgraded. Now I need to get a good reference book for 7.
    A good book is Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/wind...ott/1102784729). Since you live in Ohio, and if you haven't bought a new computer yet, you might want to take a look at this Ohio computer manufacturer (http://www.avadirect.com) with a very good reputation (http://www.resellerratings.com/store/AVA_Direct).

  12. #26
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    I'd like to second the book Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition as being a good choice.
    Good call, cloudsandskye.

    RockE

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