Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Must be in domain to connect to server?

    Hi,
    I am new. Can you still connect to another PC if you are on a Workgroup? Or, do you have to be connected to the domain to do that with a DNS Server address?

  2. Subscribe to our Windows Secrets Newsletter - It's Free!

    Get our unique weekly Newsletter with tips and techniques, how to's and critical updates on Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows XP, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google, etc. Join our 480,000 subscribers!

    Excel 2013: The Missing Manual

    + Get this BONUS — free!

    Get the most of Excel! Learn about new features, basics of creating a new spreadsheet and using the infamous Ribbon in the first chapter of Excel 2013: The Missing Manual - Subscribe and download Chapter 1 for free!

  3. #2
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    A cultural area in SW England
    Posts
    2,801
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 106 Times in 100 Posts
    Connection of one PC to another when both are in the same workgroup goes all the way back to "Windows 3.11 for Workgroups", and 1993! Admittedly, it needed quite a bit of technical knowledge then...
    BATcher

    Mr Owl ate my metal worm

  4. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brentwood, CA USA
    Posts
    14
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Not sure if this would apply but I use RealVNC to connect to my server on the internet from anywhere. It give me full control and excellent security.

  5. #4
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    3,375
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 205 Times in 195 Posts
    If the server is part of a domain and your PC is part of a workgroup you may not be able to connect. It depends on the connection method. RDP / remote desktop should be fine, mapping drives directly won't be.

    cheers, Paul

  6. #5
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Manchester, United Kingdom
    Posts
    113
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts
    Connecting to a domain server from a workgroup PC is straightforward, including mapping drives. You just need appropriate credentials. I've been doing it for years and it is common for clients moving up from a small office setup to have a few PCs using "home" OSes that can't join a domain. Also, Windows is increasingly friendly to the BYOD trend. If anything it is the easiest connection to make because you don't have to have Windows Professional and you don't need to register the PC on the domain or (usually) faff with DNS. The detail can be a little tricky, it helps the client to have network discovery turned on along with file and printer sharing. If there's a hitch you might need to flush out old connections and credentials. Detail also depends on the server and client OSes.

    For a typical case, obtain credentials for a user-level domain account. Lets say the server is called "server", the domain is "domain", the user is "user" and the password "password". There's a shared folder on the server, \\server\share (we just made up the world's least secure system). From the client PC just click the start button (or go to the start screen) and type "\\server\share" (and return!). If the server is unreachable there's a DNS issue - try replacing "server" with the IP address of the server. You should be asked for credentials. If necessary (username disabled), click "log in with a different account" or similar. Use "domain\user" as the username and enter a password. Click the "remember these credentials" box and go. That should do the trick.

    Sometimes there's a problem with mismatched credentials - maybe someone once tried to connect without a valid domain account and Windows remembers the account and the credentials. You can only ever connect one client PC with one set of credentials. To kill any latent connections, open a command window (type "cmd" on the start menu or page) and then the command "net use * /delete". To kill any incorrect credentials open Control Panel, go to User Accounts, then Manage Credentials and remove any credentials for "Server" (or the real name).

    I would suggest that the server be set up as DNS server and either DHCP server or the actual DHCP server offer the server as DNS server. Windows Server likes to recognise incoming connections and the do that it needs to see them in DNS. You might find yourself locked out sooner or later if that isn't the case. (Check the server DNS forward lookup zone has your client's IP address in it)

    I'm being a bit naive, there are other issues that can prevent a connection like firewall rules and security policy on the server, and I've written this straight off the top of my head without checking some actual command names but in principle it is easy...

    (Warning to sysadmins out there - this client PC is now a trojan horse. It has lots of rights and no responsibilities. If left on a train, your entire network is vulnerable to the "user" account. MINIMUM RIGHTS PLEASE!)

    Ian.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •