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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Best photo-sharing options for seniors on dial-up connections

    My best friend and I are both 60 and have no experience with any of the social media options. She has moved to the outskirts of Abilene, TX, and we are trying to figure out how we can best share photos. I know there are lots of photo sharing sites, but our photos would just be shared between us and we'd prefer a free service. It doesn't look like she will have access to high-speed internet and may need to use dial-up. Can Lounge members suggest some good options for us?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Celkins,

    Moving photos over a dial up connection will be quite time consuming. The only way to reduce the time would be to use a program like Irfanview to resize the photos to be fewer megabytes. This, I'm sure, you would find quite tiresome very quickly if you wish to share any volume of photos. If you friend has a Smart Phone she could take the pictures with that and post them to a social media site while keeping a close watch on her data limit. Another option is if your friend has a laptop would be for her to go to a place with free wifi and do the transfers there.

    You don't mention how may photos you want to share but your best option could be to invest in a couple of SD Cards. You could then load the photo you want to share on them and then one Forever stamp later you'd be sharing and just keep passing the cards back and forth. I know it's low tech but in your situation this might be the best solution if you are sharing more than a few photos that are of currently standard resolutions. HTH
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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  3. #3
    Lounger
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    In my opinion, this is the best solution. When mailing SD cards, if you're worried about the card getting crunched in the automated equipment or dropped and stepped on/run over, a padded mailer will help--but it costs more.

    For all the social media sites you have to stay on top of the privacy settings, or the photos may go places unintended. Yes, it's low tech and it's not free and it depends on the US mail, but we've lived with that all our lives and know how it works. I am 64 and have been using computers since before Microsoft, and the internet since just about day 1. I have no desire to try to stay atop the tangle of privacy rules and settings here, there, and everywhere, so I avoid social media sites as if they were contact poisons.

  4. #4
    Platinum Lounger
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    I didn't know there were still dial up internet connections. How do they work where you are, do you have an old modem or is it a software on the PC thing?

    cheers, Paul

  5. #5
    Lounger
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    I like the SD card option. I just bought a 16 GB SanDisk card from Amazon for about $10. I'd agree with padding the envelope for mailing, which should cost you an extra 20 cents in postage.

    Bill

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    I didn't know there were still dial up internet connections. How do they work where you are, do you have an old modem or is it a software on the PC thing?
    Sometimes the generation gap just smacks you right across the head. 8-) Yes, there are still places where the only way to get access to the Internet is via a phone line. Although 56k modems are no longer standard equipment on new PC builds, most people living in those rural areas won't necessarily have a new PC, I'll bet. If you don't have cable or satellite or dish, then you plug a phone connection into a fax/modem card on the back of your computer. I pay for seriously high-speed broadband, but it has been very unreliable in my rural community with high packet loss. When it goes down (as it regularly does), I use a free NetZero (http://www.netzero.net/) dialup connection for emergency Internet access. NetZero provides a phone number that I dial via my modem. When connected, voila I've got Internet access, albeit very slow. But for emergencies, generally all I want is email access, so speed isn't critical. But my friend in Abilene may not have any other option other than sitting at the public library to view my photos.

  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    Being an old guy who lived in the Boonies for a long time laughed heartily at your answer. Very good solution. My dial up speed was only 28.8k. No SD cards at that time. I remember when Microsoft downloads/updates, if stopped for any reason, had to restart. Nice reply Retired Geek and a good one. One of my kids worked in a computer lab that had T3 connection. I couldn't believe it, a download would start at 100k and then just rise well above several Mb's/sec, now it's just common at home, my how things change.

  8. #8
    New Lounger
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    Using CDs or DVDs

    I'm thinking instead of using SD cards, simply burning a CD of photos (or DVD if too many) and mailing would be very cheap: 10¢ for each blank CD and one stamp, if one simply puts it in a folded piece of paper, the same size as the Netflix mailers. It's better than SD card method because nothing needs to be returned. By the way, using Juno email over dial-up is very fast and an easy solution, which allows attachments and it's free.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluffycat View Post
    By the way, using Juno email over dial-up is very fast and an easy solution, which allows attachments and it's free.
    Even at 56K, dial-up is hardly what anyone these days would call fast. Have you actually tried transferring a 10-14.5Mb (not megapixel) file by dial-up? That's the size jpg file my camera typically produces. RAW files are far larger still...
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  10. #10
    Silver Lounger t8ntlikly's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by fluffycat View Post
    I'm thinking instead of using SD cards, simply burning a CD of photos (or DVD if too many) and mailing would be very cheap: 10¢ for each blank CD and one stamp, if one simply puts it in a folded piece of paper, the same size as the Netflix mailers. It's better than SD card method because nothing needs to be returned. By the way, using Juno email over dial-up is very fast and an easy solution, which allows attachments and it's free.
    Also a good solution, but how many times have you tried to write, and re-write (add to) and it all goes haywire? I like the SD Card Solution
    Thanks John
    Teamwork is essential; it gives the enemy other people to shoot at. (Murphy's War Laws #39)

  11. #11
    New Lounger
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    Just cut an old credit card in half, put the sd card between the halves, tape the edge of the cards together, mail it in an envelope. Safe and secure!

  12. #12
    Super Moderator
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    Either you don't share many photos that way or you've had far too many credit cards
    Cheers,

    Paul Edstein
    [MS MVP - Word]

  13. #13
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    If your friend does not have her own home computer, & just wants to look at the photos one or two times, then I would think that email is your best bet. It's time consuming, yes, but so is having all of the photos printed, or burning them onto a CD/DVD. You'd have to be sure that whichever option you choose...DVD, SD Card, or flash drive, she'd be able to view them in an alternate way to using the library computer. Some libraries do not allow you to bring in outside things like this & use them in their computer. If you both have digital cameras, she could pop the SD card into her camera & view the photos, though. Good luck!
    Erin Walsh,
    Director of PR-Boost Software
    www.boostsoftware.com

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