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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    ... the CC start menu ...
    The what?

  2. #17
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    classic context start menu; you're right I should have caught that and spelled it out

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by F.U.N. downtown View Post
    classic context start menu; you're right I should have caught that and spelled it out
    Well, thanks; but I still think no one but you knows what you're talking about.

    The phrase "classic context start menu" has never been used before:

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=%22clas...a3412251cc1bd1

    https://www.google.com/#q=%22classic...+start+menu%22

    Bruce

  4. #19
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    It's occurs to me that I never really get into most the new features of the OS. When I moved from XP to Vista, I denied myself the "Classic" desktop, and stuck with the Vista desktop. In XP, I had stayed with the "Classic" desktop, and on moving to Vista somewhere around 2005, I felt it time to step away from Win 2000.

    For me, the advantages to Win 8 are best framed as a choice between Win 7 and Win 8. In the economics of time and money, I upgrade every other Microsoft OS, or about every 6 or 7 years. The upgrade is universal, I plan on a new OS-certified computer, and upgrades for all application software and the paper printer. Acrobat is my primary printer.

    For me, that gives me about two years to adjust my computing life, readjust, and begin learning about the "new" things to come, as well as the things I just never knew. These new and not-known subjects revolve around data backup/archive maintenance and strategy.

    My intended advantage to choose Win 8 as compared to Win 7 has to do with straddling change. To learn and take advantage of the new, allowing for deconstruction of the old, I chose to step farther ahead. In the future, I hope it's easier on my ongoing learning and maintenance.

  5. #20
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    My base of Windows 8 customers is admittedly rather small (probably about 30 out of 1000) and understandably my Apple customers are even less (about 5); but since Windows 8 came out, I have removed 2 viruses from Macs and 0 viruses from Windows 8 computers running Windows Defender.

  6. #21
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    I didn't find a "Disadvantages of Windows 8" thread, so I read through this and...

    The main advantage of Win8 is the ability of social networkers to give up their personal privacy by simply booting their PCs and logging into their MS account. This enables Microsoft to collect all your browsing history and link it to your account, among other things. Now that the new CEO says the mission of MS is "big data," we no longer have to wonder.

    Thankfully, we can run Win8 with a local account (though it is difficult and non-intuitive and therefore will not help most users) and ignore all the apps that need to know and share everything about us to work. Let's hope the desktop version of Win9 will continue the tradition of the Personal Computer, because Windows 8 is turning the PC revolution into a Public Computer devolution. In an age when personal privacy is being voluntarily relinquished and companies are hiring and making life-altering decisions based on surreptitious data, all while the powerful in government and the private sector alike amass more and more power over the average person's life, this is no small thing.
    Last edited by Gonga; 2014-05-01 at 14:38.

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  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gonga View Post
    I didn't find a "Disadvantages of Windows 8" thread, so I reads through this and...
    And welcome to Windows Secrets. We never seem to have enough skeptics around here, hard as some of us may work to fill the void.

    I (barely) tolerate Win 8, in large part because I'm not fond of seeing corporations jerk their users around without getting burned for doing so. But since Microsoft HAS been burned and now seems to be back-pedaling appropriately I'm more seriously considering moving my activities to 8.1 (and especially 8.1.1, looking forward to what I've read about in 8.1.2).

    And no, in no case am I or will I consider using my Microsoft account as my login: I like to keep my public life separate from my private one.

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  10. #23
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    All the above 5 items are true but there are still other problems . I feel that they took an excellent system but moved everything to a different place and then renamed everything to something you don't expect. Doing tasks like making a recovery disc has become complicated for nothing as is putting shortcuts on the desktop. I am a part time tech all my clients are about 60 and up ( as am I) I can figure out how to repair win 8.1 but its not easy ,my clients are lost in this system . For people who have win XP and want security I am recommending refab win 7 computers available in Montreal at very attractive prices .I cannot recommend win 8.1 to them and feel comfortable.

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescott View Post
    I was really excited about Windows 8, and looking forward to it. During the Developers preview I learned how to edit the registry to re-enable the Start Menu, and during the Consumer Beta, I learned how to link the program list to a folder and pin it to the task bar, and use it as a Start Menu, but with each release, they made it harder to do, and finally I quit.

    I was starting to get some hope for Windows 9, but if they go to subscription that will be it for me. I'm already looking at Linux, and getting familiar with it, so that one day, I will be ready to make the leap.
    While I too await Windows 9, and a subscription model might be a bit off-putting, I still might give Win 9 a whirl.

    As for Linux, come on in, the water's fine!
    -- Bob Primak --

  12. #25
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    The 8.1 Update being established as the new baseline for further updates seems to have caught MS flatfooted as well, giving enterprise another 90 days to test and deploy before enforcement after what must have been a small but vociferous hue and cry.

    The subject was broached on Windows Weekly and this was thought to be something MS has to address if they're going to go forward with such short update/upgrade cycles because MS does have a history of messing things up update-wise on occasion.

    That might qualify as an advantage and disadvantage at the same time, like the Chinese saying (I believe); May you live in interesting times.

  13. #26
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    Change for the sake of change...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobFo View Post
    All the above 5 items are true but there are still other problems . I feel that they took an excellent system but moved everything to a different place and then renamed everything to something you don't expect. Doing tasks like making a recovery disc has become complicated for nothing as is putting shortcuts on the desktop. I am a part time tech all my clients are about 60 and up ( as am I) I can figure out how to repair win 8.1 but its not easy ,my clients are lost in this system . For people who have win XP and want security I am recommending refab win 7 computers available in Montreal at very attractive prices .I cannot recommend win 8.1 to them and feel comfortable.
    My biggest gripe with every one of Microsoft's products - from their OSes to their applications - has been their apparent desire to disrupt everyone's workflow. As some Loungers have pointed out, enthusiasts or gamers may revel in these frequent changes, giving them many opportunities to try "cool" new things.

    For those of us who actually use our computers to be productive, it is important to develop a rhythm to our workflow. Altering interfaces that users are quite comfortable with by scrambling the menus, adding "Ribbons", obtuse features or obscure function is not helpful at all. Frankly, it's no different than telling touch typists (OK, keyboardists) that they have to switch back and forth between QWERTY and DVORAK keyboards, or that they must (or must not) use a trendy, split, ergonomic keyboard. It is simply an impediment to being productive.

    If developers feel the need to innovate and "improve" interfaces, a better way to do it would be to keep the original layout and functions intact and accessible by default, but have the option to switch to or incorporate the new features of their own volition - not having them shoved down their throats. If the "new and improved" features and functions are as wonderful as the developers believe, I have no doubt that users will migrate in droves. If not, we could all still remain productive.

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  15. #27
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    Speaking of full screen 'Start Apps'. This in the weirdest way is like an evolutionary semi-step backwards.

    In the days of DOS there were methods to run many apps just like Start Apps/Windows store apps with a 3rd party app called Software Carousel. It would load the apps you'd want to run and at the touch of a hot-key 1 app would replace the other full screen...

    Of course graphics and memory weren't near what they are today but the underlying principle is there.

    The big switch to Windows was the idea of multitasking, having more then 1 window opened at a time with the option of taking the floating window and making it temporarily full screen for whatever the reason. At a glance I've seen many apps that have absolutely no place being run full screen even with bad eye sight. Go figure.

    I realize this is all changing, but almost every one of you has paid for a finished product, not one that hasn't fully evolved... I have a paid copy of Windows 8, but so far I haven't seen reason to even try it. If I need to fix a windows 8.x machine it'll take me an extra 10 minutes for something I may not be familiar in finding.

    I build, fix, game, program, watch TV and movies, re-encode, and more all on my pc flawlessly. I'm still running Windows 7.
    . hkb
    q8:{ }8p

  16. #28
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    For me the answer to the Windows 8 initially confusing and alien start screen was an inexpensive third party add on called Start 8. It provides a Windows 7 style start menu with a one click option to go the Windows 8 default menu. Result? A windows 7 style environment with wallpaper and task tray together with the boot speed and stability advantages of the Windows 8 OS. There are also free apps that are similar to Start 8.

  17. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobprimak View Post
    While I too await Windows 9, and a subscription model might be a bit off-putting, I still might give Win 9 a whirl.

    As for Linux, come on in, the water's fine!
    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr was just released, and Open Mandriva Phosphorus has not been released yet, but is scheduled to be released today.

    And there is always Linux Mint.

  18. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by hkb View Post
    Speaking of full screen 'Start Apps'. This in the weirdest way is like an evolutionary semi-step backwards.

    In the days of DOS there were methods to run many apps just like Start Apps/Windows store apps with a 3rd party app called Software Carousel. It would load the apps you'd want to run and at the touch of a hot-key 1 app would replace the other full screen...

    Of course graphics and memory weren't near what they are today but the underlying principle is there.

    The big switch to Windows was the idea of multitasking, having more then 1 window opened at a time with the option of taking the floating window and making it temporarily full screen for whatever the reason. At a glance I've seen many apps that have absolutely no place being run full screen even with bad eye sight. Go figure.

    I realize this is all changing, but almost every one of you has paid for a finished product, not one that hasn't fully evolved... I have a paid copy of Windows 8, but so far I haven't seen reason to even try it. If I need to fix a windows 8.x machine it'll take me an extra 10 minutes for something I may not be familiar in finding.

    I build, fix, game, program, watch TV and movies, re-encode, and more all on my pc flawlessly. I'm still running Windows 7.
    The programs that Carousel managed were called TSRs, Terminate and Stay Resident, and being able to have more than one program resident in memory depended on having enough memory. It was a good reason to buy more memory.

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