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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Upgrade from W7 to 8.1 = No more apps

    I did not know about this.

    I bought an online upgrade from W7 to 8.1 online, undertook the upgrade and upon logging into W8 found I had no apps at all. Everything was gone. Office, Firefox, PDF reader, other little bits & pieces I had downloaded to make life easier, all gone.

    The Upgrade asks "What do want to Keep? Nothing or Data" It's not joking, that's all you get.

    So how do you get around this problem? I can't afford to spend how many days reinstalling my apps just to get back to where I am, but I need to run W8 as I support it at work.

    Anyone else come across this problem??

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  3. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    When I upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 8, I had to install everything, but the upgrade advisor had made that clear. However, I dual boot (at the time, Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Ultimate, now Windows 8 and Windows 7 Ultimate), and I upgraded the Home edition, so I didn't actually lose anything, since Ultimate was my usual OS.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

  4. #3
    New Lounger
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    So I'm wondering, is there a way to upgrade from 7 to 8.1 without having to reinstall my apps??

  5. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    Did you keep the same bit-ness? That is, was your Windows 7 32-bit, or 64-bit, and is your Windows 8 32-bit, or 64-bit?

    If you went from Windows 7 32-bit, to Windows 8 64-bit, the installer calls it an upgrade, but it's really a fresh install.

    When I upgraded from Windows 7 64-bit to Windows 8.0 64-bit, I think I got to keep my apps, but it was just a test system, I have since blown it away, and it's been long enough that I'm not sure.

    And Windows 8.1 is a step beyond Windows 8.0. What may have been true of Windows 7 to Windows 8.0, may not be true of Windows 7 to Windows 8.1.

    I was reading instructions for using Clonezilla yesterday, and each set started with step 0, make an image.

  6. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    From: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...e-to-windows-8

    Will I be able to keep my files, settings, and apps?


    If you start (boot) your PC from installation media that you created when you downloaded the ISO, such as a DVD or USB flash drive, you won't be able to keep your apps, Windows settings, or personal files when you install Windows 8.1.

    This table shows what you can keep when you update, depending on the version of Windows you currently have running on your PC. To verify which version of Windows you have now, see Which Windows operating system am I running?


    If you're running


    You can keep:

    Windows 8 - Windows settings, personal files, and most apps

    Windows 7 - Personal files

    Windows Vista - Nothing—you must boot from media and perform a clean installation

    Windows XP - Nothing—you must boot from media and perform a clean installation


    •If you're running Windows 8, your Windows Store apps will need to be reinstalled from the Store. For instructions, see Welcome to the new Windows.


    •If you're running Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP, all of your apps will need to be reinstalled using the original installation discs, or purchase confirmation emails if you bought the apps online.

  7. #6
    New Lounger
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    Yep saw that, post upgrade. It appears upgrading from w7 to 8.1 can only be done by loosing all your apps and settings. The only way to get around it is to upgrade to 8.0 then upgrade to 8.1. From the quick look i've just done on ebay and a few suppliers, 8.0 is getting hard to find and purchase, so in another 6 months it should be almost impossible to upgrade without loosing yr apps and settings.

    Microsoft have slowly been becoming more & more illogical ever since Bill Gates stepped down from his position of power, that's how I see it anyway.

    I can't decide if this an arrogant or an ignorant decision by Microsoft??

  8. #7
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Upgrading with data and apps in place is no more than a convenience that should never be relied upon
    when moving from one OS to another, even in the best of circumstances.

    I can't decide if this an arrogant or an ignorant decision by Microsoft??
    Neither, it's a prudent and logical way to ensure that corruptions do not follow the apps and settings that are being transferred.

    One can easily get around this with proper planning, and yes, there will always be a little work involved.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  9. #8
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    That all sounds like perfect world scenario stuff to me.

    In an enterprise environment where you're rolling out to 10 or 10,000 hosts maybe, but not to home users and those of us who just want to upgrade and get going, it's a big inconvenience.

    To me, what Microsoft are saying now is, you can, as always in the past, upgrade from your current OS to the latest one. Oh, oops, you've waited a little while, you had to upgrade from your current OS to an x.0 version of the new OS which we are no longer selling. Now we're selling the x.1 version of the OS which no one can upgrade to, well not easily anyway. You can upgrade as long as you're prepared to spend many hours reinstalling and retrieving bits & pieces just so you can get back to where you are currently.

    Have Microsoft ever packaged and sold any OS as a x.1 version? I don't think so, the .1 has always been a service pack.

    Do you really think Microsoft are doing this so people aren't going to be bothered by possible problems in the future because they upgraded and didn't go for a fresh install. I don't think so, we're talking about a retail product (that get's used in the enterprise). How many home users would be able to plan, backup, and restore their data onto a freshly installed OS, I'm guessing very few.

    2 reasons why they're doing this. 1) save money, 2) make money. QED.

  10. #9
    4 Star Lounger access-mdb's Avatar
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    I've been fortunate because I've gone from Win 7 to win 8, then 8.1 and finally 8.1 Update (Oh OK, 8.1.1) without any hitches. However, there are many threads where people have said they have had problems after such upgrades and the answer has invariably been 'do a clean install'. When updating, I always had an image so I could restore if necessary. I also used Belarc advisor to list all my apps so I could restore them (if that was necessary). I actually listed these with their install sources (DVD, downloads, etc.) so I could find them easily. I used Mozbackup to backup my bookmarks in FF. All of this was a waste of time as I didn't need to do any of it, but I don't begrudge the time it took to take.

    Anyway, MS (like most firms) are in it to make money.

  11. #10
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10gallons View Post
    2 reasons why they're doing this. 1) save money, 2) make money. QED.
    #2 is the only reason any company starts a business and keeps that business going. #1 ties directly into #2.

    Is Microsoft making too much money? I don't believe their stockholders think that they are.

    What can the customer do? Don't buy something you don't like. I skipped Vista entirely, which meant that when I upgraded to Windows 7 from XP, I had to do a clean install and a re-install of all my programs and utilities. This took a little time, but I knew it was coming and was prepared for it.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

  12. #11
    New Lounger djohnson's Avatar
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    I have all applications I want to install when I upgrade, or whatever in a separate folder on a separate partition. When I install an OS, I format, install, activate, update, and then go right down the list of what I need! It doesn't take that long.

  13. #12
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10gallons View Post
    That all sounds like perfect world scenario stuff to me.

    In an enterprise environment where you're rolling out to 10 or 10,000 hosts maybe, but not to home users and those of us who just want to upgrade and get going, it's a big inconvenience.

    To me, what Microsoft are saying now is, you can, as always in the past, upgrade from your current OS to the latest one. Oh, oops, you've waited a little while, you had to upgrade from your current OS to an x.0 version of the new OS which we are no longer selling. Now we're selling the x.1 version of the OS which no one can upgrade to, well not easily anyway. You can upgrade as long as you're prepared to spend many hours reinstalling and retrieving bits & pieces just so you can get back to where you are currently.

    Have Microsoft ever packaged and sold any OS as a x.1 version? I don't think so, the .1 has always been a service pack.

    Do you really think Microsoft are doing this so people aren't going to be bothered by possible problems in the future because they upgraded and didn't go for a fresh install. I don't think so, we're talking about a retail product (that get's used in the enterprise). How many home users would be able to plan, backup, and restore their data onto a freshly installed OS, I'm guessing very few.

    2 reasons why they're doing this. 1) save money, 2) make money. QED.
    The Apple upgrade model seems to work really well [for them], but do you really want Windows to adopt this kind of model...with all the Apple like software restrictions?

    Sure they're making money, but who isn't.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Motherboard: DX58SO2*Chipset: X58 Express/Intel ICH10*BIOS: SOX5820J.86A.0888.2012.0129.2203*Processor: Intel Core i7 CPU X 990
    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

  14. #13
    New Lounger
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    The problem I have is that I don't sit at the same desk 2 days in a row, I'm out on the road everyday, so if I get somewhere and realise I don't have a particular program, that can put my work schedule out for a week until I'm back at that site the following week.

    I'll most likely purchase a new laptop now, which will give me as much time as I need to build it up, it's not what I want to do, but it looks like I'm going to have to.

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