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  1. #1
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    File-sharing strategies for Windows 7 and 8




    TOP STORY


    File-sharing strategies for Windows 7 and 8


    By Patrick Marshall
    These days, it's possible to have XP, Windows 7, and Windows 8 all running in the same household or small business.
    And though Windows 7 and 8 have similar tools for sharing files over a network, there are differences that might leave you puzzled.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/top-story/file-sharing-strategies-for-windows-7-and-8 (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

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  3. #2
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    any chance you could elaborate on file sharing strategies from Win platforms to other OSs, Linux, unix, mac, ...

  4. #3
    New Lounger
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    Still confused. What's the difference between Workgroup and Homegroup?

  5. #4
    3 Star Lounger bassfisher6522's Avatar
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    Have a look at this....

    A workgroup is a group of PCs that are connected to a home or small office network and share resources, such as printers and files. When you set up a network, Windows automatically creates a workgroup and gives it a name.

    A homegroup is a group of PCs on a home network that can share pictures, music, videos, documents, and printers. Belonging to a homegroup makes sharing easier

    reference link: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...roup-homegroup

  6. #5
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    OK, both sound like they do the same thing but the Workgroup is something automatic, set by the great and almighty MS and a Homegroup is a further refinement you can create. The Homegroup can be password protected while the Workgroup isn't. That seems to be the biggest difference.

  7. #6
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    Well, they both have their fingers in the same pie but Homegroup is limited to post Microsoft Vista OSes and is sort of based on what is included in respective local libraries as shared files/folders. Workgroups should actually be thought of more generically, as in workgroups. Microsoft confused things a bit by naming the Windows 7 workgroup, WORKGROUP, while XP's default workgroup name is MSHOME if I remember rightly. Regardless, workgroup is more of an integrated component of Windows and as such, is compatible with much older versions of Windows, and relies on direct security and sharing permissions applied to the drive/folder/file.

    By the way, the idea that all computers in a home network have to or even should have the same workgroup name is nothing but a fallacy as far as I'm concerned. I've had WORKGROUP, SUBNET, and THEHORDE as workgroup names on various computers on the same network for years and they all talk to each other and share files as if they all belonged to the same workgroup. I like the separation because the workgroup name tells me at a glance what I'm digging into; server shares, virtual shares, or "fun" shares respectively.

  8. #7
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    Here's Microsoft's high level explanation of the various network types. For Windows 7 - What is the difference between a domain, a workgroup, and a homegroup?. For Windows 8.1 - Join a domain, workgroup, or homegroup.

    Joe

  9. #8
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    Patrick did a great job of explaining how to share specific files and folders with users of the local computer. But how do I share specific files and folders with users on other PCs in the network? Or is this not possible, so sharing via the Public folder is the only way to accomplish this?

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lounge Ranger View Post
    Patrick did a great job of explaining how to share specific files and folders with users of the local computer. But how do I share specific files and folders with users on other PCs in the network? Or is this not possible, so sharing via the Public folder is the only way to accomplish this?
    No, you might have to read the article again and pay particular attention to where he's talking about adding his own custom folder share locations to the default ones; those will show up in Homegroup along with the others to all computers using the same Homegroup. Same thing goes for workgroups though the procedures are a bit more granular and in Win 7 and 8, the computers show in Network and one just needs to click (or double click) on the "other" computer with the shared folders to begin revealing them for access. Of course many shortcuts exist to this process so it is streamlined for more constant and quick access. For instance, I put the shortcuts to all my shared locations on other computers in a local folder and then add that folder as a toolbar so I have instant direct access instead of having to access the Network folder each time and start digging down into the appropriate computer to access shared files.

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    @FUN

    The default workgroup name for XP Home was MSHOME. For XP Pro it was WORKGROUP. This caused lots of confusion and wasted time.

    Joe

  12. #11
    3 Star Lounger bassfisher6522's Avatar
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    Not to mention that LLC (something real close to that) thing that had to be installed on the windows xp machines. I remember having to do that quit a few times.

  13. #12
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    Patrick should have said that when assigning computers to a workgroup, all computers must have unique names.

  14. #13
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    At a non-profit organization I volunteer at they have 4 XP computers and 2 Vista computers I'm going to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium
    If I understand the file sharing strategies it's probably best to ensure a Homegroup network
    --- I believe I'll be able to do that part ok

    But now I need in help in determining the best method for only one Folder to be shared across those 6 computers for the office personnel
    --- There is also a 7th computer available for the families we help so their children can do homework and school research and parents can look for employment. It's a Windows 7 Pro but that one Folder is not to be shared on this computer
    --- Let's call it folder ABC which will have appropriate folders and files
    --- I was going to place the ABC folder into the Documents folder but it looks to me like the 5 office personnel will be able to see whatever the manager has in his Documents folder via Public folders
    --- Is it possible to deny access to the Documents folder via Public folders but allow access for read/write only to the ABC folder
    --- Please help me understand how I can do that

    Then there's sharing the printers
    --- I'd like to believe I can still share the printers via the Public folder without including Documents
    --- So I need help on figuring this out too

    And there is one secretary who will have permission to work at home
    --- I was thinking of using TeamViewer so she can access her computer at the office
    --- Someone else has been consulted to set up a VPN but there were issues in doing so of which I don't know why
    --- From what I've read, Windows 7 has some kind of remote access capability but I get more confused on understanding what it all means
    --- My friend who owns a restaurant and uses TeamViewer so his wife can work from home and I guess I'm hoping TeamViewer is a good idea

  15. #14
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    I'm workgroup biased because I'm sharing over all makes and models of Windows OSes. Public folders are designed to be shared with everyone on the same computer and if made visible to the network, shared with everyone on the network. So I would set up the ABC folder separate and share that folder [and subfolders] with appropriate permissions all to itself. That way there's no question of the 7th family computer staying out of the ABC folder without proper permission. This is highly susceptible to social engineering however; Kevin Mitnik would break in within seconds!

    As far as the printers go; what are they connected to? Assuming they are to be connected to one or more of the upgraded office Win 7 systems, you would just share the printer(s) directly from the computer they are attached to (Start>>Printers>>right click on printer>>Sharing...), and then add the shared network printer to whichever system you want to print from; no folders are involved.

    Team viewer should work if the Internet connection (usually limited by uplink speed) is fast enough and I believe non-profits qualify to use it for free.

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  17. #15
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    Thanks F.U.N. Your explanation is nice and simple. I'll be looking into TeamViewer and the organization will more than appreciate it if they can get it for free

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