Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Morganville, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Lost Internet connection

    I have a fairly complicated home network, with a Cisco Linksys E4200 as the core (attached to my internet supplier modem). There are two 1x8 switches, two wi-fi range extenders, etc. This network has worked reliably for years.

    Recently I have been losing connection to the internet several random times throughout the day. Connection seems to be reestablished after a few minutes to an hour or so. Since this happens throughout the network and on both wired and wireless devices (including pcs, an iPad, internet radios, etc), I do not suspect a problem with the outer reaches of the network; it must be the wireless router or upstream, e.g., the cable box. [The usual fix: turning things off and restarting from the cable modem inward, does not work.]

    Any suggestions on how to diagnose and repair this?

    Thanks.

  2. Subscribe to our Windows Secrets Newsletter - It's Free!

    Get our unique weekly Newsletter with tips and techniques, how to's and critical updates on Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows XP, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google, etc. Join our 480,000 subscribers!

    Excel 2013: The Missing Manual

    + Get this BONUS — free!

    Get the most of Excel! Learn about new features, basics of creating a new spreadsheet and using the infamous Ribbon in the first chapter of Excel 2013: The Missing Manual - Subscribe and download Chapter 1 for free!

  3. #2
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    3,463
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 214 Times in 203 Posts
    The first thing I do when this happens is connect to the internet router/modem and view the connection status. Some routers have a diagnostics function that lets you ping from the router. Then test the next downstream device for connectivity etc.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #3
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi,
    I lose connectivity at different times during the day and night, and put it down to interference from mobile phones, and will change the frequency of my router to see if this improves connectivity.

  5. #4
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Morganville, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Thanks. You introduce a different aspect that I had not anticipated. A year or so ago a cell tour was erected about 1/4 mile from my home. I have no record of previous problems (before the past week).

    I am replacing my modem. In attempting to use Linksys' customer care to check my modem, I was misdirected to one of those sites that takes over a pc and attempts to get the user to pay for a full cleaning job. After cleaning it myself, the malware came back virulently, and I am now having a pro service remove the aftereffects (I hope). I should get my main pc back and my new modem by the weekend.

    It's a vicious world out there!

  6. #5
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    warren, ohio
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    have you tried tracert when it fails?

  7. #6
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    540
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 33 Times in 28 Posts
    There is an interesting multiplier at work here, and leaving malicious use aside, one wonders what the multiplication of signals signals (yes, you read that correctly). If I go to Network and Sharing|Connect to a Network I see that I have about a dozen neighbours with Wi-Fi active (which is small by big-city standards), and I know that my water meter is Wi-Fi and that when the City wants to 'read my meter' there is no meter other than the one the reader carries, which connects to my inline (and indoor) water 'meter' by Wi-Fi.

    At the same time I have one computer that reports that it in online, but it is not. It will go online for certain things but not others. I haven't figured that out myself, but it sounds like a firewall problem 'or something'. Troubleshooting takes forever, and that computer is at the bottom of the list.

    One factor you might consider in your case is whether or not there is a source of electromagnetic interference at the times of day at which you lose your connection.
    Last edited by dogberry; 2014-06-12 at 13:23.

  8. #7
    Bronze Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,486
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 217 Times in 212 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by spottyginger View Post
    Hi,
    I lose connectivity at different times during the day and night, and put it down to interference from mobile phones, and will change the frequency of my router to see if this improves connectivity.
    With something like this it's best to wire up to see if it is a wireless interference problem and if the connectivity problems persist then contact your ISP for a line test.

  9. #8
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    274
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by globalist View Post
    I have a fairly complicated home network, with a Cisco Linksys E4200 as the core (attached to my internet supplier modem). There are two 1x8 switches, two wi-fi range extenders, etc. This network has worked reliably for years.

    Recently I have been losing connection to the internet several random times throughout the day. Connection seems to be reestablished after a few minutes to an hour or so. Since this happens throughout the network and on both wired and wireless devices (including pcs, an iPad, internet radios, etc), I do not suspect a problem with the outer reaches of the network; it must be the wireless router or upstream, e.g., the cable box. [The usual fix: turning things off and restarting from the cable modem inward, does not work.]

    Any suggestions on how to diagnose and repair this?

    Thanks.
    One possibility is that your Cisco Linksys E4200 router has a component or two inside which is periodically overheating, thus causing a loss of internet until those components cool down a little later. We actually had that occur on a router we owned a couple of years ago. You can connect one PC directly to your modem for a day or two to test this possibility, or substitute a different router!

    Another possibility is interference from neighbors' wi-fi, but wouldn't that affect only your wi-fi and not your wired PCs? You could switch your router's wireless to a different channel to test that possibility, or simply turn off/disable your own wi-fi to test.

    Yet another possibility is that your internet service provider's engineers/techies are doing some work in your area and that involves interruptions to your signal. Comcast has done that to us a few times. In our case, we have cable TV as well as internet and we lost TV reception, too, so that pretty much proved to us where the source of the problem was.

  10. #9
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Morganville, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Thanks. Some good suggestions. I especially suspect the heat suggestion, as the modem runs hot and I'm not sure but the grinding noise a heard for a short period may have been an internal fan.

  11. #10
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by globalist View Post
    Thanks. Some good suggestions. I especially suspect the heat suggestion, as the modem runs hot and I'm not sure but the grinding noise a heard for a short period may have been an internal fan.
    FYI: technically a "modem" is a fairly dumb device that does not much more than dial a phone number. Computers might have a dial-up modem, FAX machines contain a modem, and there are also a number of other devices that contain a modem. If you have some form of broadband Internet connection then you must have some kind of "router". In network/computing contexts a router is a computer that directs network traffic to requested destinations. Most modern ADSL/Cable/MobileBroadband/Satellite routers run a specialised version of Linux operating system, which is why they usually take a minute or three to boot up and connect to the Internet via your ISP's network.

    ...the modem runs hot...
    Of the several thousand home/small business type routers I have encountered during the past 15+ years only a very few of the older ones had cooling fans, and as far as I recall they were all cable routers. If your router is uncomfortably warm to touch (temperature is higher than about 35C) then it quite possible that internal components are overheating and ceasing to work until they cool back down (if this is the case then it's going to die completely before long).

    Another possibility is that your ISP's network might be getting congested (more connections than their equipment can cope with). You would need to check with your ISP about this, in fact it would probably be a good idea to inform them about the drop-outs in any case.

  12. #11
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Morganville, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Yes, of course, it is a router, not a modem. Thanks.

    If it is network congestion, would I see hiccups with the HDTV signal, too? [I don't.] Or this may be a ploy to upgrade to a higher capacity service.

  13. #12
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by globalist View Post
    ...If it is network congestion, would I see hiccups with the HDTV signal, too? [I don't.]...
    Not necessarily.

    But more signicantly since your HDTV continues to work even when your Internet drops out strongly indicates that the problem is not with your router.

    If your router was overheating seriously it is expected you would lose all connectivity.

    Sounds even more like either congestion or other changes on your ISP's servers.

  14. #13
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Morganville, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    I don't understand. The signal for the router comes from the ISP modem, which brings in both the internet and phone signals. The hdtv signals are split off before the ISP modem.

  15. #14
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by globalist View Post
    ...The signal for the router comes from the ISP modem, which brings in both the internet and phone signals...
    So you have an ADSL (often called just "DSL") connection.

    I have found that the most common cause of ADSL dropouts is missing/faulty/incorrectly connected line filter/splitters. Each phone that is connected to your line needs to have a filter/splitter to prevent the phone signal (analog - a waveform like a radio wave) from interfering with the ADSL signal (digital - a continual stream of data).

    Another common cause is outdated router "firmware". "Firmware" is the router's operating system and other software. You could log in to the router ("modem") and look up the version of the installed firmware. Then check the manufacturer's website (usually under support/downloads) for later firmware. You should also find instructions there on how to perform the upgrade.

    In case you don't know how to log in to your modem-router:
    In an elevated command prompt window type "ipconfig" (without quotes) then press Enter. Look for "Default Gateway" in your network adapter's listing. It should be something like 192.168.1.1 or maybe 10.0.0.1 or similar ("IP address").

    To launch an "elevated command prompt" Start/All Programs/Accessories right-click "Command Prompt" then click (left) "Run as Administrator".

    To log in to your modem-router enter the Default Gateway's IP address into your browser's address bar then press enter. The modem-router's interface might prompt for a username and password. You could try "Admin" or "admin" for both, or username "Admin" and password "password". If these don't work you might need to look up the user manual on the manufacturer's website.

  16. #15
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Also, some modem-routers lose their configuration settings after a firmware upgrade. You should look in the router's interface for a facility to back up the configuration to a file somewhere on your computer, otherwise manually note the settings so you can restore them later if necessary.

    You should also make sure you know the password for the connection to your ISP before you attempt to upgrade; most routers either don't display the password or only show a series of dots in the password field.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •