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  1. #1
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    More on better data/boot security for Windows




    LANGALIST PLUS


    More on better data/boot security for Windows



    By Fred Langa

    TrueCrypt has been discontinued — at least for now — but that unhappy news simplifies the choice of whole-disk versus file-and-folder encryption. Plus: An old partition question arises anew, Internet Explorer opens only blank pages, and using permanent markers to aid warranty claims.


    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/more-on-better-data-boot-security-for-windows/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Tracey Capen; 2014-06-18 at 19:40.

  2. #2
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    You can check the warranty status of hard drives by visiting the manufacturer's website. Input the serial number and/or model number, and you can generate an RMA right there, if it's under warranty.

    As for writing on them...sharpie on the metal comes right off with alcohol. If you write on the label it will never come off completely....once it's been there a while.

  3. #3
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    By the way, where is the email address that goes to the writers? I've searched everywhere and can't find it.

  4. #4
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    Regarding the partitioning recommendations, I'm not sure a 128GB SSD is big enough to run Windows from. I have a 256GB SSD for my Win7 installation, and it's exactly half-full (and I don't think I'd be considered to have an excessive number of programs installed). My Win8.1 installation with just the OS plus Office takes up over 60GB. 128GB SSD + 5TB hard drive sounds unbalanced to me, I'd spend a few extra dollars and go for 256GB.

  5. #5
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    When I purchase hardware and such a take a moment to mark the date, purchase location, model# and serial numbers. Makes it much easier to find receipts, etc. I used to do this on the paperwork that came with the device but now do it in a text file and scan the paper so I don't have to store it.

    The device can then easily be matched by serial number. No need to mark it as I just use existing markings. This has worked well for me.
    It also just means cut and paste for web browsing for registration, seeking updates, or help.

  6. #6
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    All replies to Windows Secrets contributors go through editor@windowssecrets.com

  7. #7
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    Writing on CDs/DVDs with a permanent marker (like a Sharpie) is a bad idea. Sharpies and most permanent markers contain alcohol, which over time can degrade a CD/DVD. Last time I checked with the Sharpie manufacturer, even the Sharpies that are marketed as CD/DVD markers contained alcohol (which isn't stated on the package). If you're just marking a DVD you burned of the last NBA game or a movie you recorded off the web, and you're not concerned about it lasting a long time, a Sharpie's fine. If you really want to preserve the disc and its data, use specialty CD/DVD marking pens, which are available at better office supply stores, some photography stores, and on-line. Highest quality are available from places like University Products and Light Impressions, which supply archival materials to libraries, research institutions, and the like.

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