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  1. #16
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Sorry, technically there is no such thing as a "DSL modem".

    Technically it is an "ADSL router".

    And your statement that:



    is also technically quite wrong. In computing/networking contexts a router is a specialised computer that directs network traffic to requested destinations. If you want to argue with me on these points I suggest you should first research the questions to establish just what the facts are.

    I refuse to argue the point with you - I have a University degree in Information Systems, have worked as a web programmer for several years, and have been working full-time as a computer consultant/technician for the past 15+ years - who are you, and what authority do you have for your claims?

    Just because tech support personnel bow to your misconception that your ADSL router is a "modem" does not mean it is anything else but a router (which it definitely is). Again, do your research and get your facts straight.
    Any web citation to back that up? Even the manufacturers call them modems unless they contain built in routers for multiple ethernet ports and/or wireless connections.

    See http://www.netgear.com/home/products.../dm111psp.aspx as an example.

    By the way, I've been working with computers for 49 years including some design work with mainframe networking and an EE degree.

    Jerry

  2. #17
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Sorry, technically there is no such thing as a "DSL modem".
    Sigh, some people just don't want to admit they made a mistake. I googled "DSL Modem" and found this Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSL_modem
    It clearly stated that:

    "A digital subscriber line (DSL) modem is a device used to connect a computer or router to a telephone line which provides the digital subscriber line service for connectivity to the Internet, which is often called DSL broadband."

    Okay, I know you're gonna probably gonna ream me for committing a cardinal sin by citing Wikipedia as a "reliable source" but I'm seriously frustrated with this entire topic and can't afford to waste any more time proving my point than I already am. Right back to the article: It's clear that not ALL computers having a DSL connection MUST be hooked up to a router. Look, there's a reason not all routers have modems built in (like the Netgear N150, Netgear N300, Cisco Linksys E900). You want to know why? Because there is no need of one when you already have an external DSL modem.

    If you can take one look at the pic bbearren took pains to post (BTW thank you very much for posting this bbearren), then this whole topic of conversation would have been over.

    Oh and regarding research? We'd be overjoyed if you could find a reliable source that states "there's no such thing as DSL modems".
    Last edited by KritzX; 2014-07-05 at 13:37. Reason: Typos
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  3. #18
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    My degree of pursuit was Information Technology, all my instructors were PhD's, and the bit of hardware used to connect a business or residence with the central telephone office via asynchronous digital subscriber line was commonly referred to as a "DSL modem". Occasionally someone might say "ADSL modem", but it was never called a "router". In the CTO the modems are mounted on boards in groups, but the individual connection per subscriber line was still called a "modem", an electronic device that makes possible the transmission of data to or from a computer via telephone or other communication lines.

    In order to share that transmission of data between two or more devices on a home network (computers, network printers), a router is necessary. The simple home router is able to share the single IP address of the subscriber by utilizing network address translation to remap that address into the home network address space.

    Although the desktop and laptops in my home network could each take turns using the DSL modem, it's much simpler and more convenient to connect the modem to a router, and share the connection. I can even use my network printer via the router, which would not be practical at all using just the modem.

    Here is a pretty good HowStuffWorks article on "How DSL Works" , for those who might be interested.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  4. #19
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Thank you for your reply bbearren. Ya, I know having a router is really beneficial but my major problem is I cannot decide on a model! Could you kindly offer any suggestions on picking out a good, reliable, inexpensive router? Without a modem built-in?
    Fact of Life:

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  5. #20
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maligo View Post
    Thank you for your reply bbearren. Ya, I know having a router is really beneficial but my major problem is I cannot decide on a model! Could you kindly offer any suggestions on picking out a good, reliable, inexpensive router? Without a modem built-in?
    As you can see from the pic, the one I'm using now is a Netgear, and this one is about 4 years old. It's an N750 4-port gigabit Ethernet/dual-band wireless with hardware firewall, and I've never had a minute's problem out of it.

    It replaced another, older Netgear that was 10/100 Ethernet, without wireless. The gigabit might not be noticeable on the internet side of things, but it is on the home network side transferring files/sync-ing between PC's, making drive images to my NAS (also gigabit), and using the network printer.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  6. #21
    3 Star Lounger KritzX's Avatar
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    Thanks for your suggestion! I'll be sure to check it out soon.
    Fact of Life:

    “Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.”
    Terry Pratchett

  7. #22
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    My ADSL connection is through a Netgear DGN1000 Gateway-router ("modem" if you insist). It has four LAN (ethernet) ports and WLAN (aka "WiFi").

    Because the Gateway is a router I do not need to have a second router on my network. All I need in addition to the Gateway is a simple eight-port switch. This setup allows me to connect up to ten devices via ethernet plus any wireless devices I want to connect. If I wanted more ethernet connections I could simply add another switch, but I have not yet had need to do so.

    A major advantage of this setup is that I have never had to wrestle with DHCP conflicts as I have often had to for customers who had two routers on the same home/small business network.

    However, I have also encountered customers who had cable Internet connections whose cable router did not have WLAN and only one ethernet port, so needed a router with four or more LAN ports and WLAN.

  8. #23
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    What you have is a DSL Modem (MODulator/DEModulator) with a built in router or as Netgear calls it a "Modem Router". The functionalities are separate but contained in the same box.

    However, I have also encountered customers who had cable Internet connections whose cable router did not have WLAN and only one Ethernet port, so needed a router with four or more LAN ports and WLAN.
    That's a Cable Modem not a cable router. That the setup I use Cable Modem connected to a separate Router.

    Jerry

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