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  1. #16
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    32bit will only support up to 4G of RAM, no more. I have been running Win7, 64bit for a few years. I have had zero issue's with program compatibility. I suppose some very old programs that haven't been updated may not work, but most programs have been updated and will run on a 64bit system. Beside's, more RAM.....more better

  2. #17
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    If running a 64-bit Windows 7, and you find a 32-bit program that does not work properly, will it likely run in a virtual 32-bit windows such as Oracle Virtual Box, or XP mode in Win 7 ?
    Last edited by gbhall; 2014-06-27 at 02:58.

  3. #18
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    When Windows 7 was still in its infancy, could have been a late beta version, I installed Windows 7 64 bit and my first three applications refused to install. (Old, but favored, applications) I formatted and installed 32 bit Windows and remain partial to 32 bit Windows. HOWEVER, I recently, just a few weeks ago, purchased a used Windows 7 64 bit laptop and it has not failed to install any application that I attempted to install on it. (Some of the old applications that would not install on the earlier version of Windows 7 64 bit.) The only problem has been that the 64 bit laptop has been and remains to be sickeningly slow. This may, or may not, be related to the recently purchased laptop being a Home Premium level OS and all my other Windows 7 computers being either Professional or Ultimate. Just some of my personal observation to guide your decision.

  4. #19
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    32bit will only support up to 4G of RAM
    Actually, 32-bit Windows will not access 4GB of memory. Depending on your hardware, it will access from 2.5GB to 3.5GB of memory. If you have a Video card for instance, it will probably be closer to 2.5GB.

  5. #20
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    FrontPage 2003 runs with no problems under 64-bit Win7. Been doing it for years. Have also never had any problems running 32-bit software under this configuration.

  6. #21
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    64-bit with at least 8 gb ram is the only way to go. It's time to bite the bullet and join the 21st century.

  7. #22
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    With x32 you're stuck with a 3GB RAM limit, and that includes any RAM that is used for video. 3GB is beginning to look pretty skimpy. If you're getting a new mobo, and CPU (get 4 cores at least), it would be madness to stick with x32. I just cobbled together a system with Win 7, a 240GB SSD, 1TB Secondary HD, 16GB of RAM & 4GB VRAM, and it was not hugely expensive. The cold boot time is 25 seconds, Adobe Photoshop CS6 loads in about 5 seconds. It would be hard to go back to the 3GB x32 system I replaced.

    David

  8. #23
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    I recommend going to 64-bit. It is much smoother, allows you to have more resources for your programs and just simply works better. The driver problem is not as extensive as you may hear. Regardless of which version you use, there's always going to be a driver issue with something. However, I have found that 99.9% of the time, I did not have a driver problem. You can buy a third-party driver program such as driver genius, but Microsoft does a fairly decent job of providing drivers for the most common hardware. Your 32-bit programs, such as your Microsoft products will run under 64-bit. I also ran office 2007 and all of its accouterments under Windows 64. There is a office 64-bit version, which I would probably not use because many of the add-ins don't work very well with it. However, Windows 7 64-bit is the way to go.

    Having said all that, you have to have more than 4 GB of RAM to make it all worthwhile. Windows 32 will only address 4 GB of RAM but Windows 64 will dress the maximum RAM the chip set your motherboard will support. For example, an X58 chipset will support up to 24 GB of RAM and some of the newer processors will support more than that. When I say "support" I mean that you are actually have that much RAM available for your programs. If you install 16 GB of RAM with Windows 7 64, you actually have 16 GB RAM available. This in and of itself makes it all worthwhile.

    I will give you a caveat and say that if you have some hardware device that is not exactly "mainstream", you might have a driver problem. This includes older models of printers and scanners and things like that. I'll also agreed that the installation CD that comes which a motherboard should have the motherboard drivers but you are probably going to get more up-to-date drivers from the manufacturer's website. I installed an Asus Z87 motherboard and many of the drivers that came on the installation CD were out of date and would not work. This was not a problem of Windows 7, it was a problem that the motherboard manufacturing date was not "today" and therefore the drivers had already been updated. This problem is going to vary depending on the motherboard manufacturer. Just simply be prepared for some of that geewhiz stuff to not work the way that the advertisement says it should. But if you are able to build a unit at the motherboard level, you should not have a problem with this.

    Having more than 4 GB of RAM is an absolute must because Windows 64 is going to want to use 4 GB RAM up front, so you will want to have more than 4 GB of RAM. Anything between 8 GB and 16 GB is probably going to be enough unless you are doing some very heavy stuff or building a starship.
    Last edited by MQG1023; 2014-06-29 at 10:02.

  9. #24
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    Thanks to all for the additional input.
    I am rethinking the 3.3 gb ram limit of 32 bit systems; thus causing me to now lean toward W7 64 bit.
    I am encouraged by several peoples observation that most everything will run under 64 bit OS. I was worried about that side of it. I don't run any old 16 bit stuff, so no issue.
    I have since picked up a 2 x 4gb G.Slick DDR3 1333 ram package, so going 64 bit now seems like the only practical solution.
    I am not trying to build a monster gaming system or anything fancy. This was supposed to be a low cost interim upgrade for the obsolete old Gateway original stuff.

    Unfortunately I have just endured a major issue with the new ASRock G41C-GS MoBo I got.
    I installed it along with the 8 gb new ram (above), retaining all the other original hardware including the Q6600 quad cpu.
    When I powered it all up, the fans etc start up fine, the heat sinks get mildly warm, but there is no wake up signal to the monitor.
    I then tried a spare monitor just to rule that out.
    I contacted ASRock, and they provided a checklist of things, which I did, and all seemed to be fine.

    This board just acts like there is no output to the VGA socket, thus no monitor, and without that you cannot tell what else is going on at all.
    Eventually after nearly 2 days of total frustration, I swapped the old board back in, and I am back up and running again.
    ASRock have been pretty good about it; they have agreed to send me an RMA. Once they recieve the board back, they will test it and replace it if defective, or ship the original back to me if it proves out OK. I guess that is as good as it gets. Its just been a major waste of time.

    I should mention here that I understand all about static electricity, I always use an ESD mat and a wrist strap. I am familiar with various upgrades including memory, cpu's, power supplies, hard drives, and complete MoBo's. The Q6600 is working fine back in the original board, and yes, it is listed by ASRock as compatible with their board.
    I have sent an email to G.Slick just to check if the ram is compatible with the board, just to rule that out. It is 8 chips per side, double sided, non-ECC and unbuffered, so I figured it would be OK.

    Once all this gets sorted out I will get back to the W7 business.

    Thanks to all,
    rstew

  10. #25
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    Just now I looked up your G41C-GS motherboard on the Asrock website. It seems that if your motherboard is Revision 1 it will only work with Core2 (dual-core) LGA775 CPUs.

    However, if your G41C-GS is Rev. 2.0 it should support Q6600 LGA775 Quad-core.

    If your motherboard is Rev. 1.0 it simply not work with the Q6600.

    The motherboard's revision number should be found usually somewhere near the lower-left corner or might be on a sticker often on top of one of the keyboard/mouse, USB, or Network risers.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittlestMac View Post
    ...x64 is impervious to a many of the virus programs which affect x32 (imho, that is).
    Don't know you're right about that mate.
    Computer Consultant/Technician 15+ years experience.
    Most common computing error is EBKACB: Error Between Keyboard And Chair Back

  12. #27
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    Check whether your processor supports either Intel EM64T extensions (minimum Intel Pentium 4 5x1, 6xx models or Celeron D 3x6 models) or AMD64 extensions (minimum AMD Athlon 64 or K8 CPUs). Don't bother installing 64-bit Windows 7 if using Intel Pentium 3 / AMD K7 or older CPUs because those processors can only handle 32-bit OSes & a 32bit Windows 7 OS will have to be used on those older CPUs.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Just now I looked up your G41C-GS motherboard on the Asrock website. It seems that if your motherboard is Revision 1 it will only work with Core2 (dual-core) LGA775 CPUs.

    However, if your G41C-GS is Rev. 2.0 it should support Q6600 LGA775 Quad-core.

    If your motherboard is Rev. 1.0 it simply not work with the Q6600.

    The motherboard's revision number should be found usually somewhere near the lower-left corner or might be on a sticker often on top of one of the keyboard/mouse, USB, or Network risers.
    I guess I need to check this out with ASRock.
    I have shipped the MoBo back to them, so I have no way of checking the rev no on the board.
    But the manual that came with it (dated Dec 2013) lists support as follows:
    - LGA 775 for Intel® CoreTM 2 Extreme / CoreTM 2 Quad / CoreTM
    2 Duo / Pentium® Dual Core / Celeron® Dual Core / Celeron®,
    supporting Penryn Quad Core Yorkfield and Dual Core
    Wolfdale processors
    - Supports FSB1333/1066/800/533 MHz
    - Supports Hyper-Threading Technology (see CAUTION 1)
    - Supports Untied Overclocking Technology (see CAUTION 2)
    - Supports EM64T CPU

    So I kind of figured it should support a Q6600 no problem.
    Also in my emails back and forth whillst trying to troubleshoot the problem I indicated it was a Q6600 processor, which they did not indicate was incompatible.???

    rstew

  14. #29
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    Ok, a little update.
    I went to the ASRock site, and under compatible cpus for the G41C-GS motherboard, it lists a whole swath of Core 2 Quad cpus, including the Q6600.
    Cpu's for the G41C-GS Rev 2.0 board are listed separately.
    So I don't know whether I misunderstood Coochin's comments, or if I am misinterpretting the info on the ASRock site, but it looks to me like the Q6600 should be compatible with the G41C-GS board.
    Can anyone verify or clarify this mess please?

    Thanks,
    rstew

  15. #30
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    First question I will ask: Why are you using a Socket 775 motherboard and CPU today, we are talking hardware that are years old? Now that being said:

    Yes, your Q6600 will work on all BIOSes on the board, I would highly recommend you verify that it is running the 1.40 BIOS version due to it's many "fixes" that include all previous updates. On power up, are you getting any "beeps" from the speaker (if you have one), and if so, is there any "code" being sounded? No video could be a bad board, bad cpu, or bad/incompatible memory (did you check the compatibility list?). If speaker hooked up and no beep code, generally it's the CPU (you didn't bend any pins on installation, did you?). Sometimes just removing the CMOS battery and using the CMOS Clear jumper for 60 seconds will be enough to kick the BIOS POST so you can get into the BIOS and at least try saving the recommended configuration. You should first try POSTing the board outside of the case with no other hardware connected so as to rule out any electrical shorts or other device failures on installation.

    As far as Windows 7 x64, it and the CPU will run 32bit code natively, so there should be no issues installing and running MOST 32bit software. When installing, you can right click the install program, and choose to install it in compatibility mode for Windows XP with administrative privileges if it won't install using normal methods. I always recommend 64bit OSes when available, and a minimum of 4GBs of RAM, 8GBs preferred. Sixty-four bit CPUs and OSes also have better execution code halts if some nefarious malware that uses certain types of "buffer over runs" to attack your computer.

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