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  1. #1
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    Administrative rights seem more restrictive as Win 8 progresses

    I've found that as Windows 8 has progressed in versions administrative rights are being asked for more and more, and often denied. Among the areas I've especially noticed are 1) having to set or run programs as administrator for the instance or generally that used to run directly; and 2) being unable to download and unzip program updates into their specific folders in C:\Programs and C:\Programs (x86), where I was able to do that before. Mine is a single user system, being run from a loca/admin account (+ an Admin account not normally used). Are others noticing this? Are there safe ways to counteract it, such as with item 2 and in general?

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    Indeed I have noticed it, for me internal program settings kept in the program files were denied change, and many other read-only restrictions that do an excellent job of making a user angry. I know that's better security at work but what about those who don't need such internal guarded gate nonsense?

    I was making rather ham-fisted advanced security settings changes to break my own computer free of such stuff until I realized again that Win 8, among other things, is just too darn overbearing about everything and that I don't have to put up with that when two other OSes are working perfectly fine for me, so I shelved it...a safe counteract!!

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    Which version of Windows were you using before Win8?

    2) being unable to download and unzip program updates into their specific folders in C:\Programs and C:\Programs (x86)
    I've always considered those Folders to be used only for installed programs, not for copying uncompressed programs into them. If I have a program that can be run without installing I put them into a new Folder in C:\ of an appropriate name then create a Desktop/Start Menu shortcut to its .exe/executable file. Updates for programs should be installed following the program's routine, not just copying files as the install routine makes changes to the Registry to reflect changes made to the program.
    Last edited by Berton; 2014-07-04 at 19:58.

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Hey Y'all,

    Of course this is just my opinion but I don't have any problems w/Win 8.1 Update 1 Pro. I appreciate the extra security and it is easy enough to set up a run-on-demand scheduled task to run those programs that need admin rights like Revo Uninstaller, etc. Personally I'd rather answer a hundred prompts than get hit with a cryptolocker or such.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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    Oh I agree with you wholeheartedly on that respect but for those of us who do not need the "lowest common denominator" type protection, the inconvenience (weekly) outweighs the benefits [never realized].

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berton View Post
    Which version of Windows were you using before Win8?


    I've always considered those Folders to be used only for installed programs, not for copying uncompressed programs into them. If I have a program that can be run without installing I put them into a new Folder in C:\ of an appropriate name then create a Desktop/Start Menu shortcut to its .exe/executable file. Updates for programs should be installed following the program's routine, not just copying files as the install routine makes changes to the Registry to reflect changes made to the program.
    Win 7. I was an early final Win 8 adopter. About unzipping, I was referring to program updates whose contents I want to put directly into its program folder, that don't install but get copied in (e.g., email client Sylpheed and perhaps those like autoruns). Depending on the program, it would plant itself as a subfolder and I would just copy (overwrite) the contents to program's main folder. Starting with Win 8.1, if I'm not mistaken, I'm told that requires administrator rights, which I supposedly don't have. But those are what I thought the Local/Admin user account gave me. At least it did under Win 7 and early Win 8. With programs that have their own installer, it's not an issue.

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    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    HighStream,

    What I do with things like SysInternals Suite and NirSoft Utilities is to put them under a folder called NonInstPgms. I place this folder under Documents! Yes, Documents. I do this because I use a 128Gb SSD for my boot drive and have moved the Documents folder to my 1TB HDD to save space on the SSD. It also comes in handy when I sync Documents to my laptop for travel those programs also sync. YMMV.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredGeek View Post
    HighStream,

    What I do with things like SysInternals Suite and NirSoft Utilities is to put them under a folder called NonInstPgms. I place this folder under Documents! Yes, Documents. I do this because I use a 128Gb SSD for my boot drive and have moved the Documents folder to my 1TB HDD to save space on the SSD. It also comes in handy when I sync Documents to my laptop for travel those programs also sync. YMMV.
    Your file organization makes absolutely no sense to me. Nor does it have to. But that's not the topic here (and I'm not the type to contort my file organization to avoid dealing with a problem such as Windows 8 has progressively posed - not to suggest you do).
    Last edited by highstream; 2014-07-05 at 07:43.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highstream View Post
    I've found that as Windows 8 has progressed in versions administrative rights are being asked for more and more, and often denied. Among the areas I've especially noticed are 1) having to set or run programs as administrator for the instance or generally that used to run directly; and 2) being unable to download and unzip program updates into their specific folders in C:\Programs and C:\Programs (x86), where I was able to do that before. Mine is a single user system, being run from a loca/admin account (+ an Admin account not normally used). Are others noticing this? Are there safe ways to counteract it, such as with item 2 and in general?

    Some registry keys/values will be blocked as well as the usual things you've mentioned, and it's a hell of an ordeal getting around it.
    But overall it's a vast security improvement, secured largely from ...yourself.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    From Win2K on, I've run routinely as a standard user, having created a user profile in the Administrators group to use for maintenance, some installations, etc. I see this as the safest way to use a PC that is connected to the internet (YMMV), and I've never felt inconvenienced by this safety net.

    The biggest problems I've ever encountered in my years of computing were all self-induced, so I much prefer the extra layer of protection. It's like making an image backup before making system changes; better safe than sorry.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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    I don't use texting or chat, prefer plain English, so I don't get what (YMMV) means.

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    I think it speaks to the convoluted ways necessary - or that MS thinks necessary - to improve security. Since it doesn't stop programs with their own installer, it really affects those without, typically utilities and others where the developers don't need or want to run installs (more complicated to program, more subject to problems?). Presumably, the assumption is that programs w/o installers are more apt to be malware. Is that true? Wonder if that will push the non-install developers to change their programming.

    (YMMV = your mileage may vary, i.e., your experience may be different).
    Last edited by highstream; 2014-07-05 at 11:32.

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    I see it like drugs. Some require a prescription, ie. a protection or identification, for use.

    Because of the internet, I want protection and identification for some things. So as others have mentioned, I have two user IDs. I don't skate the internet as an 'admin'.

    For me, the restrictions are a positive. Perhaps, proactive.

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    So do I. One is called Administrator and the other, at least when Win 8 came out, was identified as Local/Admin (see the OP). As Windows has progressed, I've had to run more and more programs in whole or in part as administrator. Am I really more secure because of it, or is that just people accepting what they are told or surmise from the changes?

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