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  1. #1
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    Unhappy USB Flash Drive HELL!

    I have 2 USB Cruzer 32 GB flash drives that I brought to a friend's home and was planning to get files off of. When I plugged in the first one, his computer said it was not recognized by Windows XP. I have used these drives on all WIndows OS with never a prob. I then took out first flash drive and plugged in the second one. Same msg. comes up that windows didn't recognize it. I was not able to get either to work on his computer. I've never had a problem with these flash drives!

    But now, when I plug them into my Windows 7 and Windows 8 computers, they both come up as Not recognized, failed enumeration and something about failed configuration descriptor (code 43). How can both of them, the exact same flash drives, both go bad, where they were previously working just fine??? I desperately need the files from these drives, which both flash drives are a backup of each other. So now neither flash drive works. Please help!! These flash drives are totally no longer recognized by any computer anymore. What happened? All this happened after the fateful day of plugging them into my friend's computer.

    Thanks for any and all help. I'm really freaking here.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Microsoft Windows USB Core Team Blog

    1) The USB device is "hung".

    The USB device may have encountered an internal error and simply stopped functioning. The device will have a code 43 in Device Manager. Removing all power from the device (e.g. unplugging and re-plugging the USB cable and also the power cable if it has one) will reset the device and allow it to enumerate successfully.

    2) Worn or faulty USB connectors and cables.

    Over time USB cables and connectors can fail. Try plugging it into a different USB port, and also using a different USB cable if it is removable. The device will have a code 43 error in Device Manager.

    3) No driver is installed, and the USB device does not report a device description string.

    In this case Windows was unable to find a driver for the device, and the device did not report a device description string. The device will have a code 28 in Device Manager. To resolve this problem you will need to find a compatible driver for the device, typically by contacting the device’s manufacturer.

    4) There is insufficient power to start the device.

    If the device is downstream of a bus-powered hub, the device can enumerate successfully but may not be able to start due to insufficient power. This a bus-powered hub cannot supply more than 100mA to a port, whereas a self-powered hub can supply 500mA. The device will have a code 28 in Device Manager. To resolve this problem, plug-in the hub’s power supply (if it has one), move the device to a root hub port, or move the device to another hub that is self-powered.

    5) The upstream hub has failed or is "hung".

    If the device is connected to an external hub, try moving the device to a different hub or a root port. If the device enumerate successfully, try power-cycling the hub or removing/replacing it. Device will have a code 28 in Device Manager.

    6) The USB device has failed.

    It is possible that the USB device itself has suffered a hardware failure and is no longer functional. You will need to replace the device. Device will have a code 43 in Device Manager.

    -Martin Borve
    Try some of the above.
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  4. #3
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    Does your friend have any Flash drives of his own that work on the machine ?

    It's possible there could be something wrong with the ports which has damaged the contacts on your Flash drives so that they are no longer being powered up - have you had a look for any physical damage to the contacts ?

    If there's crucial info on your USBs then you may need the services of someone like http://www.fixmyflashdrive.com/ to recover the data but I think it would be an expensive process.

    After having another look around, came across http://www.runpcrun.com/cant-install-usb which may get things going again on your friend's XP machine, but not sure if it would reinitialize anything for your other systems.
    Last edited by Sudo15; 2014-07-23 at 04:05.

  5. #4
    4 Star Lounger Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    ...came across http://www.runpcrun.com/cant-install-usb which may get things going again on your friend's XP machine, but not sure if it would reinitialize anything for your other systems.
    Now and then have seen this kind of USB problem on customers' computers (XP & Win7). Sometimes if Windows fails to connect to or install a USB device the result is a corrupted entry in Device Manager after which other USB devices might also fail to work. Because Windows only shows currently connected devices it is not easy to see what is causing the problem.

    The OP could try the following (unplug the USB Flash drives first):
    Open an elevated Command Prompt (Start/Search, type "cmd" [no quotes]).
    At the top of the list of results right-click "cmd" (cmd.exe) then left-click "Run as Administrator".
    At the prompt type "SET DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1" (no quotes) then press Enter.
    Then type "START DEVMGMT.MSC" then press Enter.
    A "Device Manager" window should open; click on View/Show hidden devices

    Any greyed-out (disconnected) devices listed under "Disk Drives" and "Universal Serial Bus controllers" that you recognise as your USB Flash drives should be removed (right-click/Uninstall).
    Any greyed-out (disconnected) devices listed under "Unknown Devices" should be safe to remove.

    Once you have removed any problem devices you should restart Windows; once Windows has loaded fully plug in one of your Flash drives - Windows should now detect and install it normally.
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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Now and then have seen this kind of USB problem on customers' computers (XP & Win7). Sometimes if Windows fails to connect to or install a USB device the result is a corrupted entry in Device Manager after which other USB devices might also fail to work. Because Windows only shows currently connected devices it is not easy to see what is causing the problem.

    The OP could try the following (unplug the USB Flash drives first):
    Open an elevated Command Prompt (Start/Search, type "cmd" [no quotes]).
    At the top of the list of results right-click "cmd" (cmd.exe) then left-click "Run as Administrator".
    At the prompt type "SET DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1" (no quotes) then press Enter.
    Then type "START DEVMGMT.MSC" then press Enter.
    A "Device Manager" window should open; click on View/Show hidden devices

    Any greyed-out (disconnected) devices listed under "Disk Drives" and "Universal Serial Bus controllers" that you recognise as your USB Flash drives should be removed (right-click/Uninstall).
    Any greyed-out (disconnected) devices listed under "Unknown Devices" should be safe to remove.

    Once you have removed any problem devices you should restart Windows; once Windows has loaded fully plug in one of your Flash drives - Windows should now detect and install it normally.
    But would this answer why the Flash drives no longer work in bytemare's machines either ?
    Last edited by Sudo15; 2014-07-24 at 05:27.

  7. #6
    4 Star Lounger Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo15 View Post
    But would this answer why the Flash drives no longer work in bytemare's machines either ?
    Hard question to answer for sure. But bytemare wants to recover the data on his Flash drives, and the method I suggested is non-destructive provided it is performed carefully.

    I always carry a couple of 32GB Kingston "Flash drives" which have many programs, etc., on them I use when working on customers' computers. Every so often I plug one of them into a customer's computer and later plug it into another customer's computer or one of my own; sometimes Windows throws up a prompt offering to "Scan and Fix" errors on the drive. This is what I would expect in bytemare's case from what he describes.

    But it seems clear that bytemare's friend's XP system triggered the problem he's having, so his best initial efforts should be aimed at getting them to work again on his Windows 7 system, before worrying about the XP or Win8 systems.
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  8. #7
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    The golden rule of recovery when pulling out a bogged vehicle is to pull it out from the way it went it.

    Using this analogy, I would tend to try and get it work in the XP first as you would be working blind attempting to get it to work in the Win 7 without knowing what caused the failure.

    If that's a no-go and no other Flash drives work in the XP, then it's likely that the Flash drives are shot as well as problems with the USB ports - but all this is conjecture and we'll have to wait until bytemare comes back to let us know how he's got on with all of the suggestions.

    I think it may also be worthwhile checking that the USB ports are still working on the Win 7 & 8 machines with serviceable Flash drives.

  9. #8
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    I have had problems like that with cruzer and one other brand.

    Some of them try to be too fancy and trip over their own feet if the PC is not in tune with what they are doing.

    UDMA and one other variation also causes me some difficulties.


    Quote Originally Posted by bytemare View Post
    I have 2 USB Cruzer 32 GB flash drives that I brought to a friend's home and was planning to get files off of. When I plugged in the first one, his computer said it was not recognized by Windows XP. I have used these drives on all WIndows OS with never a prob. I then took out first flash drive and plugged in the second one. Same msg. comes up that windows didn't recognize it. I was not able to get either to work on his computer. I've never had a problem with these flash drives!

    But now, when I plug them into my Windows 7 and Windows 8 computers, they both come up as Not recognized, failed enumeration and something about failed configuration descriptor (code 43). How can both of them, the exact same flash drives, both go bad, where they were previously working just fine??? I desperately need the files from these drives, which both flash drives are a backup of each other. So now neither flash drive works. Please help!! These flash drives are totally no longer recognized by any computer anymore. What happened? All this happened after the fateful day of plugging them into my friend's computer.

    Thanks for any and all help. I'm really freaking here.

  10. #9
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    Sandisk are the most unreliable and most incompatible with current Flash data recovery technology.

    Whenever you get the errors you got when plugging in a Flash drive, there is 99% chance the controller chip has gone bad. This can happen by a short, removing the drives without ejecting them first, and physical damage, etc.

    In this situation in order to recover the data the NAND need to be pulled off the PCB and put in a special reader. The data is read and then compiled, the controller chip is basically bypassed.
    We do this sort of thing all the time.

    This is what it looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbNo1WYgyG0. This is of a BGA chip but its the same process for a Chip off recovery of a regular NAND that is probably like the ones on your device (we will be uploading one for that within a few days).

    This cannot be done DIY, and like I said Sandisk are the least compatible with current technology, but it's always worth a try.

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