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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    Why we're moving to the IPv6 network protocol




    BEST PRACTICES

    Why we're moving to the IPv6 network protocol




    By Douglas Spindler

    For decades, all devices connected to the Internet have had an IPv4 network address. But the protocol is nearly tapped out.

    To provide more headroom for new devices, we're all transitioning — in fits and starts — to IPv6. Here why that's important.

    The full text of this column is posted at http://windowssecrets.com/best-pract...work-protocol/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Kathleen Atkins; 2014-07-23 at 18:36.

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  3. #2
    Star Lounger tgw7078's Avatar
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    Quote from article:
    (There's a common misconception that IPv6 can be removed or disabled. It can't be removed, but it can be disabled. Because IPv6 is an integral part of the Windows, Microsoft states that disabling it will probably break some Windows components or cause erratic performance. The company believes there is no valid reason to disable IPv6 and strongly advises against it.)
    I have IPv6 disabled for my network adapter, and have not had any problems other than the built-in Windows 7 mapping tool no longer working. As far as security-related advice is concerned, I'll trust Fluke Networks before I trust Microsoft. Please see the following paper:

    The Invisible Threat: IPv6 on your network
    http://support.flukenetworks.com/por...10_ENG_B_W.PDF
    Tom Wickerath
    Microsoft Access MVP
    4/1/2006 - 3/31/2012

  4. #3
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    I'm not sure about my ISP router that I'm using as my ISP doesn't support IPv6 but it's default unchecked in another router that I have and leaving it checked in the Network adapter Properties hasn't caused me any problems, although it has been reported for some to interfere with an Internet connection and unchecking its box has resolved Internet connectivity problems.

  5. #4
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgw7078 View Post
    Quote from article:


    I have IPv6 disabled for my network adapter, and have not had any problems other than the built-in Windows 7 mapping tool no longer working. As far as security-related advice is concerned, I'll trust Fluke Networks before I trust Microsoft. Please see the following paper:

    The Invisible Threat: IPv6 on your network
    http://support.flukenetworks.com/por...10_ENG_B_W.PDF
    I looked over that White Paper, and noticed that it is a sales document to sell business Network Admins on two Network Analyzers, both of which cost more than a home user would want to pay.

    Their use of the term "firewall" means only a hardware appliance not generally found in home networks and not relevant to the Windows Secrets article's content.

    And finally, the date on the White Paper is 2012, which was some time ago.

    Still, many points in the White Paper do apply generally. The tendency of IPv6 to keep more ports open is of concern to home users and business users alike. The risks of tunnelling techniques also should be reviewed by any home user or small business operator who may be considering opening up our networks to IPv6 traffic.

    While the security risks are real, they can be managed, once we know and understand what the issues are.

    All told, an interesting read.
    -- Bob Primak --

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