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  1. #1
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    Win7 Home Prem- 32 or 64 bit, use of 'Anytime Upgrade Feature'

    I have been trying to decide if I CAN switch from the 32bit Win7 HP that I now have to a Win7 64 bit, so that I can have at least 8GB of RAM. The info I get is a bit complex for me, but I will try to create a question that works.
    On Sep 7, 2009, Digital Inspiration wrote an article about being able to use the Anytime Upgrade Feature to change from my 32bit to a 64bit version. But he also says that "Win7 HP supports up to 2 physical processors with unlimited cores..." and I don't know the difference. Then in one of the articles here, I read a comment by np-7930 on 2014-07-07, 03:17 #27, that dealt with which AMD CPUs were required and I'm already lost.
    So, here is what I have: ASUS Motherboard, Mdl M4A79T Deluxe: CPU: AMD Phenom CC / Athlon X4, Athlon X3 / Athlon X2 processors with socket AM3.
    'np' says "minimum AMD Athlon 64" - mine says AMD (presumption) Athlon X4. Does that qualify?
    And if so, can I upgrade with no difficulty to 64 bit Win7 HP using that "Anytime Upgrade Feature"?
    Is this an understandable question and can someone give me some instructions in layman's terms as to how to proceed, please?
    Thank you, Julia

  2. #2
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    Basically it is not easy to change from 32-bit to 64-bit, or vice verse, has to be a full install which probably will cause loss of data, be sure to have a good backup of your data, anything that exists nowhere else. I believe that Upgrade Anytime is intended to move from Home Premium up to Professional or to Ultimate versions.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    On Sep 7, 2009, Digital Inspiration wrote an article about being able to use the Anytime Upgrade Feature to change from my 32bit to a 64bit version
    Provide a link if you can.

    No upgrades for you.
    If you want to move to a 64 bit version of Windows 7, go purchase the DVD and perform a clean install.
    That means backing up all your data, because you're going to loose it in the clean install, and then download ALL of your
    needed drivers from the HP site.


    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...#1TC=windows-7
    Can I upgrade both 32-bit versions and 64-bit versions of Windows 7 with Windows Anytime Upgrade?
    Yes, you can use Windows Anytime Upgrade to upgrade a 32-bit version to a 32-bit version or from a 64-bit version to a
    64-bit version of Windows 7. However, Windows Anytime Upgrade can't upgrade a 32-bit version to a 64-bit version of
    Windows 7 or a 64-bit version to a 32-bit version of Windows 7
    .
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2014-07-25 at 23:43.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Windows 8.1, 64 bit
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    GPU: Nvidia GTX 580*Memory: Corsair 12 GB, 4x3@1600*PSU: Corsair HX1000*Hard drives: REVO X2 160GB*OCZ VERT X3 120GB*5 mechanical storage drives (12 TB) total.

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    The anytime upgrade was not meant to change the from 32 bit to 64 bit, just to upgrade from a less featured version to a more featured one. Migration from 32 to 64 bit requires a clean install, no matter what you may have read from Digital Inspiration. So, as other posters correctly stated, you will have to perform a clean install. You can install over the existing version, in which case Windows will create a Windows.old file with the contents of your current Windows version, or you can choose to format your disk while installing, in which case no Windows.old file will exist. In either case, a backup of all your relevant data is strongly recommended.
    Rui
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    R4

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    Upgrading with "Anytime Upgrade"

    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    The anytime upgrade was not meant to change the from 32 bit to 64 bit, just to upgrade from a less featured version to a more featured one. Migration from 32 to 64 bit requires a clean install, no matter what you may have read from Digital Inspiration. So, as other posters correctly stated, you will have to perform a clean install. You can install over the existing version, in which case Windows will create a Windows.old file with the contents of your current Windows version, or you can choose to format your disk while installing, in which case no Windows.old file will exist. In either case, a backup of all your relevant data is strongly recommended.
    Thank you for this information, Rui. I will try to remember to post where I get info. I always put that in my doc when I copy something. Here is that link:
    http://www.labnol.org/software/windo...ng-guide/9663/
    The article was dated on Sep 7, 2009.

    I probably read it wrong. I was definitely under the wrong impression, but have already ordered the 64 bit Win7 HP, and Amazon is going to give me credit for the 32 bit I bought, for which I am really grateful.
    Yes, I definitely plan a clean install and I always back up my data, including my bookmarks. I realize that I will have absolutely no data available and must bring it in from my backups. As a matter of fact, Linux left me without my regular off-site online backup, which I will now have to re-start - everything for backup is different now and I need something that is easy for me. I used to have Connected Online Backup (bought by Iron Mountain and then?), which I really liked. But I am doing research on a whole lot of things with this change back to Windows. I just hope I can do all this - so many things - it's difficult. So much has changed.
    Wish me luck and thanks so much for your realistic advice! That's what I really need - I have no technical help available here in Costa Rica. The super intelligent guy who spoke English refuses to work with anything from Microsoft and won't even help me switch back - even though he promised me that Linux could do everything (and maybe it can for someone with no car accident affecting their brain).

    Anyway, truly appreciate the information and help. A straight answer really works for me! Another gift from the Lounge! Thank you and have a great day!

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    Hi Julia,

    You are welcome and there will be a lot of members here ready help you get back to Windows

    Regarding backups in Windows, you really have different choices. One thing you should do when you have completely setup your operating system and the apps you may need, is to create a full system image. Windows has a native feature that allows you to do that, but there are also more full featured apps, both free and paid.

    Depending on your habits and the "rate of change" of your files and documents, you can couple the images, which you should take regularly, with a files and documents backup strategy, that allows you to back them up between images. If that rate of change is not big, you can maybe even get away with just image backups, provided they are frequent enough to make sure that in case of a problem, you don't loose too much data.

    You will find many posts on backup and imaging in the Maintenance forum and remember, we're here to help .
    Rui
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    R4

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    Back ups & system images

    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    Hi Julia,

    You are welcome and there will be a lot of members here ready help you get back to Windows

    Regarding backups in Windows, you really have different choices. One thing you should do when you have completely setup your operating system and the apps you may need, is to create a full system image. Windows has a native feature that allows you to do that, but there are also more full featured apps, both free and paid.

    Depending on your habits and the "rate of change" of your files and documents, you can couple the images, which you should take regularly, with a files and documents backup strategy, that allows you to back them up between images. If that rate of change is not big, you can maybe even get away with just image backups, provided they are frequent enough to make sure that in case of a problem, you don't loose too much data.

    You will find many posts on backup and imaging in the Maintenance forum and remember, we're here to help .
    Well, Rui, you have brought up something that has changed completely since I last had Windows and your advice is needed and appreciated.
    My previous process was to pay Connected Online Backup $15 per month for unlimited space. I backed up at least every 2 days and it provided me with the information of what had changed during that time. I will certainly need something like that with my current brain difficulty! But the backup options are so different now. I am going to check to see if my old system is still available because it worked like Windows Explorer, which is the mainstay of any work I do in Windows.
    But a system image is new to me. I know it's in the notes by Fred Langa in "10 great 'Do these first' tweaks for Windows 7' on Dec 16, 2010 in 'Top Story' in the Windows Secrets Newsletter (the first thing I renewed when I knew I would be changing). But he doesn't mention alternatives to the built-in process. I definitely am a 'protection' person. If you are aware of something that makes the process clear and easy to restore, I sure would like to know about it.
    I have always, also, had the system make a copy that allowed me to 'backtrack' to a previous period. I had this set up for every 3 days. I don't remember what it was called, but I'll probably find it in my readings.
    To me, it's not a matter of 'if' the computer will have a problem - the question is 'when' and if I was careful before my accident (in the states where I could get anything fixed reliably) - when I could do most everything for myself - I can assure you that I am far more concerned - actually scared - now that the 'logic function' in my brain has been slightly damaged and am looking for more protection now - with easy to understand instructions for reinstating systems and data.
    So, if you are aware of more realistic applications for 'dummies', your input will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks so much,
    Julia

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    Julia,

    If Connected Online Backup works for you and it is still offered, that can work. There are similar solutions now, which may have more competitive prices, like Carbonite, Backblaze, or Crashplan that will deal with the non image backup part.

    Why is an image backup recommended and how does it differ from the backup made by the other apps? The good thing about an image is that it takes a complete snapshot of your system, which includes the operating system and all relevant files. If something goes wrong, you can simply restore the image and you will have your computer at the exact condition it was at the time you created the image. It makes it pretty effortless to restore a computer to a working condition.

    With the two strategies coupled, it would be rather easy to image, say once a month and then the time in between will be filled by your Connected Online Backup. This would you mean restoring your computer and getting back the latest version of your documents could be accomplished in a rather easy and relatively fast way.

    In your post, I think you were talking about System Restore. This is something that Windows includes by default and it can be helpful - I have it active on all my computers. With system restore you can go back to the time at which the system restore points were made and this affects only system files - your regular documents won't be affected.

    My suggestion would be to get started and setup all you need, restore your documents from your backup and get your computer in working order. Then pick up an online backup service and start backing up your files and documents. You can then make a choice between going with the Windows native imaging functionality or picking up an alternative imaging solution.

    I think forum members mostly use one of four alternatives: Macrium Reflect, Ease US Todo (these are available in free and paid versions), Acronis True Image and Teraby Image for Windows (the latter two only available in paid versions). I guess you can say all of these have people who will vouch for them and it is usually a matter of personal preference.
    Rui
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    R4

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    3 Star Lounger Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julia Henson View Post
    ...So, here is what I have: ASUS Motherboard, Mdl M4A79T Deluxe: CPU: AMD Phenom CC / Athlon X4, Athlon X3 / Athlon X2 processors with socket AM3... ...mine says AMD (presumption) Athlon X4. Does that qualify?...
    Your motherboard only has one AM3 CPU socket (http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M4A...pecifications/), so you need not worry about that.

    The "Anytime Upgrade Feature" is of no use to upgrade from 32bit (x86) to 64bit (x64) Windows; you must do a format/install.

    Windows 7's "Backup and Restore" feature is a reliable way to backup, and by default creates a system image. But it is best to use a dedicated USB Hard Drive for this. There is no reason why you cannot use both the Windows "Backup and Restore" feature as well as a good online backup service.

    You would probably find using 3rd party disk imaging programs much more challenging than Windows "Backup and Restore".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    Your motherboard only has one AM3 CPU socket (http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M4A...pecifications/), so you need not worry about that.

    The "Anytime Upgrade Feature" is of no use to upgrade from 32bit (x86) to 64bit (x64) Windows; you must do a format/install.

    Windows 7's "Backup and Restore" feature is a reliable way to backup, and by default creates a system image. But it is best to use a dedicated USB Hard Drive for this. There is no reason why you cannot use both the Windows "Backup and Restore" feature as well as a good online backup service.

    You would probably find using 3rd party disk imaging programs much more challenging than Windows "Backup and Restore".
    Thank you for such a clear answer! That resolves this issue and "Anytime Upgrade", plus some. Thank you Coochin. Have a lovely day!

  11. #11
    3 Star Lounger Coochin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julia Henson View Post
    ...Have a lovely day!
    I might also venture to mention that I used Powerquest "Partition Magic" and "DriveImage" until about 2006 for imaging/backup of customers' systems but gave up on them after encountering problems with newer versions (thankyou Symantec Corp! [NOT]). After some research I switched to "BootIt Next Generation" (thankyou Fred Langa [seriously]) which has since been re-named "BootIt Bare Metal" from http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ (includes "Image for DOS").

    Since switching to BootIt I have had *no* further problems with partitioning or imaging (but have kept up-to-date with each new version as they are released).

    Nevertheless, for most users of Windows 7 and later there is really no need to resort to any 3rd-party imaging solution - the default Windows' "Backup and Restore" functionality is really excellent. But take note that if it becomes necessary to restore an image created under "Backup and Restore" you will need to have previously created a "system repair disk" (see the "Backup and Restore" dialog).
    Computer Consultant/Technician 15+ years experience.
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  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Coochin For This Useful Post:

    Julia Henson (2014-07-29)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coochin View Post
    I might also venture to mention that I used Powerquest "Partition Magic" and "DriveImage" until about 2006 for imaging/backup of customers' systems but gave up on them after encountering problems with newer versions (thankyou Symantec Corp! [NOT]). After some research I switched to "BootIt Next Generation" (thankyou Fred Langa [seriously]) which has since been re-named "BootIt Bare Metal" from http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ (includes "Image for DOS").

    Since switching to BootIt I have had *no* further problems with partitioning or imaging (but have kept up-to-date with each new version as they are released).

    Nevertheless, for most users of Windows 7 and later there is really no need to resort to any 3rd-party imaging solution - the default Windows' "Backup and Restore" functionality is really excellent. But take note that if it becomes necessary to restore an image created under "Backup and Restore" you will need to have previously created a "system repair disk" (see the "Backup and Restore" dialog).
    Thank you again, Coochin. I tend to be a 'redundancy' person: so, if for some reason the 'system repair disk', even though supposedly 'tested', does not work, I want to have an alternative 'saving grace', so to speak. So your experience and the name of what you use is most appreciated!
    Thank you,
    Julia

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